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Jun 13, 2016

Neutrons reveal unexpected magnetism in rare-earth alloy

Posted by in categories: electronics, materials

More news on ORNL’s efforts around magnetic excitations in the metallic compound ytterbium-platinum-lead (Yb2Pt2Pb).


Researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory and their collaborators used neutron scattering to uncover magnetic excitations in the metallic compound ytterbium-platinum-lead (Yb2Pt2Pb). Surprisingly, this three-dimensional material exhibits magnetic properties that one would conventionally expect if the connectivity between magnetic ions was only one-dimensional. Their research is discussed in a paper published in the journal Science.

An electron can theoretically be understood as a bound state of three quasiparticles, which collectively carry its identity: spin, charge and orbit. It has been known that the spinon, the entity that carries information about electron spin, can “separate” itself from the others under certain conditions in one-dimensional chains of magnetic ions such as copper (Cu2+) in an insulating host. Now, the new study reveals that spinons are also present in metallic Yb2Pt2Pb.

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Jun 13, 2016

Researchers gear up galaxy-seeking robots for a test run — By Glenn Roberts Jr. | Phys.org

Posted by in categories: cosmology, robotics/AI, science, space

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“A prototype system, designed as a test for a planned array of 5,000 galaxy-seeking robots, is taking shape at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).”

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Jun 13, 2016

The cure for cancer could be as simple as a vaccine

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

How cool would it be to stop cancer dead in its tracks using a vaccine that would work regardless of cancer type? It turns out that humanity is already thinking along those lines, and it’s looking to introduce a type of “universal cancer vaccine” that would be able to trigger the human’s body built-in defenses to kill cancerous cells.

Specifically, researchers at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz, Germany, have initiated a limited safety human trial, after experiments on mice showed impressive results.

Don’t miss: This might be the most exciting and unexpected Apple announcement at WWDC 2016.

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Jun 13, 2016

Is Particle Physics About to Crack Wide Open?

Posted by in category: particle physics

Hints of an unexpected new particle could be confirmed within days—and if it is, the Standard Model could be going down.

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Jun 13, 2016

IKEA Indoor Gardens Produce Food Year-Round for Homes & Restaurants

Posted by in categories: food, habitats

IKEA recently launched a hydroponic gardening system to allow people to grow fresh produce at home (without soil or sunlight) and has just unveiled a similar system under development that is aimed at helping restaurants raise ingredients in-house.

ikea home grown

The KRYDDA/VÄXER hydroponic garden lets sprout seeds without soil using absorbent foam plugs that keep plants moist (without over-watering, thanks to a built-in sensor). Germinated seeds can then be transferred to pots fitted into a growing tray featuring a solar lamp. The system is designed to be easy to use for even inexpert gardeners.

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Jun 13, 2016

Quantum dots may hold key to superior 3D printing materials

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, chemistry, engineering, quantum physics

New research demonstrates that quantum dots solve a key issue with current 3D printing materials. I spoke with Keroles Riad, PhD student at Concordia University Montreal, Quebec, Canada, about his thesis on the photostability of materials used for stereolithography 3D printing. The research was supervised by Prof. Paula Wood-Adams, Prof. Rolf Wuthrich of the Mechanical and industrial engineering department at Concordia and Prof. Jerome Claverie of the Chemistry department at the University of Quebec in Montreal.

While quantum dots have been shown to cure acrylics, Riad says this work is the first demonstration of the process in epoxy resin.

3D printing is often richly rewarding because it spans multiple disciplines. Here we look at a new thesis that advances the critical area of materials. The approach taken uses engineering, chemistry and physics to overcome the issue of stability present in current stereolithography processes. The results could form the basis of superior materials and wider use of 3D printing in many areas.

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Jun 13, 2016

The obvious connection between 3D Printing and Space Colonization

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, physics, space

Gerard K. O’Neill’s name might not ring a bell for many of us, but he certainly is one of the most significant names in the world of physics and space sciences. Gerard was an American physicist whose ideologies resonated with the concept of Space Manufacturing and Space Colonization as early as 1969.

He visualized establishment of a space manufacturing facility that would product end products for use in the outer space. Located in a very high orbit as compared to Earth, or on any celestial body, he claimed that the manufacturing facility would be self-sufficient and would be built entirely using materials available on celestial surfaces like lunar soil. When O’Neill presented his novel idea using research papers at different forums, he faced rejection and disapproval as every other world-changing idea did.

Related: Bringing Back Space Culture

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Jun 13, 2016

The Singularity Controversy

Posted by in categories: computing, robotics/AI, singularity

In this London Futurists event, Amnon Eden, lead editor of the volume “Singularity Hypotheses” which was published three years ago, provided an update on the controversies about the Technological Singularity. Topics covered include:

Luddites, Philistines, and Starry-Eyed: The War over Killer Robots

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Jun 13, 2016

Movie written by AI algorithm turns out to be hilarious and intense

Posted by in categories: computing, entertainment, information science, robotics/AI

A cool experiment — a movie script written by a computer algorithm. It’s actually pretty riveting, but I challenge you to figure out what it’s about, LOL! bigsmile (Y) #AIScreenwriter #WhatDoesItMean

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Jun 13, 2016

LinkedIn + Microsoft: Changing the Way the World Works

Posted by in category: business

Excellent acquisition on multiple fronts. However, I will post the question that will most be definitely on the minds of some folks; “what protections around privacy will MSFT employees and others have with their InMails and communications with recruiters and others who they connect with on LinkedIn?” We have not just MSFT employees, Apple, Google, etc. And, many people have used this site to connect for business and joint ventures, to locate their next opportunity, etc. So, if we look at the larger picture this really must be asked.


This is the email I sent to LinkedIn’s global workforce today. I thought it might be interesting to others, too, so I’ve decided to publish it publicly.

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