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Aug 24, 2016

The NSA Plans for a Post-Quantum World

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, government, information science, internet, privacy, quantum physics, security

Hope they’re working with QC researchers in Los Alamos and DARPA; it is the US Government which is known for its silos and multi-layer bureaucracies.


Quantum computing is a novel way to build computers — one that takes advantage of the quantum properties of particles to perform operations on data in a very different way than traditional computers. In some cases, the algorithm speedups are extraordinary.

Specifically, a quantum computer using something called Shor’s algorithm can efficiently factor numbers, breaking RSA. A variant can break Diffie-Hellman and other discrete log-based cryptosystems, including those that use elliptic curves. This could potentially render all modern public-key algorithms insecure. Before you panic, note that the largest number to date that has been factored by a quantum computer is 143. So while a practical quantum computer is still science fiction, it’s not stupid science fiction.

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Aug 24, 2016

DARPA Wants You! To Down Rogue Drones

Posted by in categories: drones, military

Ever wanted to down a neighborhood nuisance drone and couldn’t? Or maybe you have some frustration that has built over time and want to release it. Well, here is your chance. DARPA wants you to down a rogue drone.


The Pentagon’s futuristic think tank is thinking about how to stop errant drones and it wants the public’s help. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Tactical Technology Office this week announced a request for information to help create “novel, flexible, mobile layered” anti-drone soluti…

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Aug 24, 2016

New Lidar Chips for Self-Driving Vehicles are Smaller Than a Dime, Cost $10 to Manufacture

Posted by in categories: computing, robotics/AI, transportation

The Lidar (Light detection and ranging) systems on self-driving vehicles are big and generally expensive. MIT has a Lidar-on-a-chip solution that will fit on a dime and cost about $10 to manufacture.

radar system on a chip

Please consider the IEEE Spectrum article MIT and DARPA Pack Lidar Sensor Onto Single Chip.

Continue reading “New Lidar Chips for Self-Driving Vehicles are Smaller Than a Dime, Cost $10 to Manufacture” »

Aug 24, 2016

You Must Define This Term to De-Risk Innovation

Posted by in categories: education, innovation

Very true; even some added the question “is it insane enough?” in the mix. I noticed that Jack Ma seems to like this one.


The Innovation Excellence community is home to innovation articles, webinars, videos, training and education — powering successful growth in the innovation management profession.

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Aug 24, 2016

Algae as vessels for synthetic biology

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological

Nice.


Algae (a term used to group many photosynthetic organisms into a rather heterologous mash-up) do not have a kind place in the public imagination. Take for example the following passage from Stephen King’s Pet Semetary:

“Dead fields under a November sky, scattered rose petals brown and turning up at the edges, empty pools scummed with algae, rot, decomposition, dust…”

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Aug 24, 2016

Quantum theory is starting to be put into practice

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, transportation

More folks finally seeing the Quantum light.


The story of quantum theory and its applications could be compared to the era of the horse and the arrival of the car.

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Aug 24, 2016

Why quantum satellites will make it harder for states to snoop

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, quantum physics, satellites

Very true point.


With the launch of the world’s first quantum communication satellite, the era of unhackable communication has begun.

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Aug 24, 2016

Experiment confirms plan for quantum-coded messages

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Really old research breathing new life.


A new way to send secret quantum messages uses shorter keys.

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Aug 24, 2016

The magic of the game changing electric dark matter black holes BH in the crowded centers of galaxies

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics

New electric dark matter black holes seem to be game changers if concentrated in galaxy centers.

Game changing because BH crowded areas do not form linear Herbig Haro systems with star formation in between.

Result: Red and Dead galaxies as the start of the decline and big crunch.

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Aug 24, 2016

Quantum Entanglement: Slower Than Light

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics, space

Although this is true (speed of communication via entanglement is not at the speed of light); like other early stage technologies this will also evolve and improve in time.


China recently launched a satellite to test quantum entanglement in space. It’s an interesting experiment that could lead to “hack proof” satellite communication. It’s also led to a flurry of articles claiming that quantum entanglement allows particles to communicate faster than light. Several science bloggers have noted why this is wrong, but it’s worth emphasizing again. Quantum entanglement does not allow faster than light communication.

This particular misconception is grounded in the way quantum theory is typically popularized. Quantum objects can be both particles and waves, They have a wavefunction that describes the probability of certain outcomes, and when you measure the object it “collapses” into a particular particle state. Unfortunately this Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory glosses over much of the subtlety of quantum behavior, so when it’s applied to entanglement it seems a bit contradictory.

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