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Jun 17, 2016

Could an implant have saved the life of the toddler attacked by an alligator?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, computing, geopolitics, mobile phones, transhumanism, transportation, wearables

A new article considering chip implants:


Among other tragedies in Florida recently gripping America’s attention, a 2-year-old boy was snatched away from its parents by an alligator at Walt Disney World on Wednesday. I have a similar-aged toddler myself, and I followed this heartbreaking story closely. Unfortunately, it ended as horribly as it began, with the recovery of a dead child.

My presidential campaign with the Transhumanist Party is based on advocating for radical science and technology to make the world a better place for humans. As a result, for nearly two years I have been advocating for using chip implants in people to help keep them safer. Chip implants are often just the size of a grain of rice and can be injected by a needle in a nearly pain-free 60-second procedure. The implants can do a multiple array of things depending on the type. And much of the technology has been used in pets for over a decade, so it’s already been shown to be relatively safe.

Continue reading “Could an implant have saved the life of the toddler attacked by an alligator?” »

Jun 17, 2016

World’s first 1,000-processor chip

Posted by in category: computing

A microchip containing 1,000 independent programmable processors has been designed by a team at the University of California, Davis, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. The energy-efficient “KiloCore” chip has a maximum computation rate of 1.78 trillion instructions per second and contains 621 million transistors. The KiloCore was presented at the 2016 Symposium on VLSI Technology and Circuits in Honolulu on June 16.

“To the best of our knowledge, it is the world’s first 1,000-processor chip and it is the highest clock-rate processor ever designed in a university,” said Bevan Baas, professor of electrical and computer engineering, who led the team that designed the . While other multiple-processor chips have been created, none exceed about 300 , according to an analysis by Baas’ team. Most were created for research purposes and few are sold commercially. The KiloCore chip was fabricated by IBM using their 32 nm CMOS technology.

Each processor core can run its own small program independently of the others, which is a fundamentally more flexible approach than so-called Single-Instruction-Multiple-Data approaches utilized by processors such as GPUs; the idea is to break an application up into many small pieces, each of which can run in parallel on different processors, enabling high throughput with lower energy use, Baas said.

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Jun 17, 2016

The case for slower growth – but how? – 46th St. Gallen Symposium | St. Gallen Symposium

Posted by in category: economics

Jun 17, 2016

We just got better at detecting this phenomenon in quantum physics that Einstein thought was too ‘spooky’ to be real

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

Einstein called it “spooky action at a distance.”

That’s because entanglement, a voodoo-like phenomenon in quantum physics linking particles that once interacted, seems to surpass the speed of light, violating the cosmic speed limit.

Because of this, it doesn’t fit in with Einstein’s theory of relativity, so he concluded that it was too ludicrous to be real.

Continue reading “We just got better at detecting this phenomenon in quantum physics that Einstein thought was too ‘spooky’ to be real” »

Jun 17, 2016

New video makes NASA’s next Jupiter mission look like a blockbuster

Posted by in category: space travel

NASA’s new trailer for its Juno mission to Jupiter shows off the huge planet in all its scary glory.

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Jun 17, 2016

Lab-grown sperm makes healthy offspring

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Sperm have been made in the laboratory and used to father healthy baby mice in a pioneering move that could lead to infertility treatments.

The Chinese research took a stem cell, converted it into primitive sperm and fertilised an egg to produce healthy pups.

The study, in the Journal Cell Stem Cell, showed they were all healthy and grew up to have offspring of their own.

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Jun 17, 2016

Orange peeler

Posted by in category: futurism

This machine peels oranges is the most perfect way.

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Jun 17, 2016

Future terrorist attacks could be carried out by drones carrying buckets of ACID

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, drones, terrorism

An article by the Mirror on possible future drone terrorist attacks:


Swarms of cheap 3D-printed drones could be used to carry out deadly terror attacks.

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Jun 17, 2016

QuintessenceLabs getting truly random with quantum security

Posted by in categories: government, quantum physics, security

Canberra-based QuintessenceLabs has taken its university research and transformed it into a quantum security firm, with its products used globally by the likes of the United States government.

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Jun 17, 2016

Researchers refine method for detecting quantum entanglement

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

RMIT quantum computing researchers have developed and demonstrated a method capable of efficiently detecting high-dimensional entanglement.

Entanglement in is the ability of two or more particles to be related to each other in ways which are beyond what is possible in classical physics.

Having information on a particle in an entangled ensemble reveals an “unnatural” amount of information on the other particles.

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