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Sep 7, 2016

Scientists study effects of extra space dimensions in particle physics and cosmology

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

There are many theoretical models to explain such aspects of high energy physics as dark matter, theory of inflation, bariosynthesis, the Higgs mechanism, etc. The discovery of universal expansion is accelerating, precise measurements of characteristics of the cosmic microwave background, and indirect confirmations of the existence of dark matter have significantly advanced observational and theoretical cosmology. The connection between cosmological processes in the early universe and physics of elementary particles is getting clearer. Theories with additional compact measurements (multidimensional gravity) have contributed to the explanation of a series of phenomena in cosmology and the physics of elementary particles including inflation, baryon asymmetry, black holes and dark matter. Multidimensional gravity may become one of the basics of fundamental theoretical physics.

The development of colliders led to the discovery of a number of new particles, which was a great confirmation of the Standard Model ℠ of particle physics. The real SM triumph was the discovery of the Higgs boson in LHC experiments in CERN. However, despite the success of SM in , there is a series of questions and problems that can’t be explained by it—for example, baryon asymmetry, the origin of the Higgs field, the production of the early quasars, etc.

A theoretical direction, which is based on the idea of multidimensional gravity, is being developed at the MEPhI Department № 40 under the supervision of Professor S.G. Rubin. For the past several years, interesting results have been obtained on the basis of this research. In a thesis by Alexey Grobov titled “Effects of extra spaces in particle physics and cosmology,” multidimensional gravitational models contribute to better understanding of connections between astrophysics and microphysics phenomena.

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Sep 7, 2016

We Might Be Getting Closer To “Immortality” Through Medical Nanotechnology

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, health, life extension, nanotechnology, neuroscience, Peter Diamandis

No shock to me.


Diamandis claimed that we are gearing towards a future possible of “interface mind-machine, where in human brain’s consciousness could be uploaded to computer and then transferred to a new body—probably a cultured in the lab. He estimates that it will just take 20–30 years to be realized.

The reality of extended life longevity to almost immortality is actually not too hard to believe these days. After all science and technology never failed to amuse us to make the once impossible possible.

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Sep 7, 2016

China plans futuristic $1.5-billion theme park with near-space balloon ride experience

Posted by in categories: futurism, space

China has unveiled plans for a futuristic $1.5-billion theme park with links to its high-altitude balloon project that could one day take tourists on leisurely rides to near-space.

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Sep 7, 2016

China Overtakes US in Scientific Articles, Robots, Supercomputers

Posted by in categories: energy, military, robotics/AI, supercomputing

http://www.unz.com/akarlin/sinotriumph/

Nothing illustrates China’s meteoric rise as some well chosen numbers.

By the end of the 1990s, China had come to dominate the mainstays of geopolitical power in the 20th century – coal and steel production. As a consequence, it leapt to the top of the Compositive Index of National Capability, which uses military expenditure, military personnel, energy consumption, iron and steel production, urban population, and total population as a proxy of national power. Still, one could legitimately argue that all of these factors are hardly relevant today. While Germany’s fourfold preponderance in steel production over Russia may have been a critical number in 1914, China’s eightfold advantage in steel production over the US by 2014 is all but meaningless in any relevant comparison of national power. The world has moved on.

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Sep 7, 2016

The Science of a New Space Race

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, economics, health, science, security, space, sustainability

The future frontier for hackers is synthetic biology.


Landmark scientific projects such as the Human Genome Project can encourage international cooperation and bring nations together. However, when security interests and defence research align with the prestige of a landmark project—international competition is all but assured. Synthetic biology is a scientific discipline less than a decade old, and the potential defence and security applications may create a new space race, this time between the USA and China.

The larger concern is not that this race may happen, but that if it does it will politicise and militarise an ethically sensitive area of the life sciences at a time when this frontier technology is critical to maintaining a sustainable world.

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Sep 7, 2016

MIT News: Hacking microbes

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, food

Micro-manufacturing is perfecting quality control.


Biology is the world’s greatest manufacturing platform, according to MIT spinout Ginkgo Bioworks.

The synthetic-biology startup is re-engineering yeast to act as tiny organic “factories” that produce chemicals for the flavor, fragrance, and food industries, with aims of making products more quickly, cheaply, and efficiently than traditional methods.

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Sep 7, 2016

Amateur biohackers could create a biological weapon, scientist warns

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, security

Hackers new weapon.


Professor John Parrington, from Oxford University, warns that the security services, including the FBI, are increasingly concerned about the spread of gene editing technology by biohackers.

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Sep 7, 2016

Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis

Posted by in categories: biological, food, sustainability

Scientists from the University of Southampton have reengineered the fundamental process of photosynthesis to power useful chemical reactions that could be used to produce biofuels, pharmaceuticals and fine chemicals.

Photosynthesis is the pivotal biological reaction on the planet, providing the food we eat, the oxygen we breathe and removing CO2 from the atmosphere.

Photosynthesis in plants and algae consists of two reactions, the light-reactions absorb light energy from the sun and use this to split water (H2O) into electrons, protons and oxygen and the dark-reactions which use the electrons and protons from the light reactions to ‘fix’ CO2 from the atmosphere into simple sugars that are the basis of the food chain. Importantly, the light reactions have a much higher capacity than the dark reactions resulting in much of the absorbed being wasted as heat rather than being used to ‘fix’ CO2.

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Sep 7, 2016

Making of an Active Galactic Nucleus

Posted by in category: futurism

Nice.


In light of new observations, the traditional dusty-torus picture of active galactic nuclei may need revision.

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Sep 7, 2016

Nano-lipid Particles From Edible Ginger Could Improve Drug Delivery for Colon Cancer, Study Finds

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, nanotechnology, particle physics

A new tool to battle colon cancer.


Edible ginger-derived nano-lipids created from a specific population of ginger nanoparticles show promise for effectively targeting and delivering chemotherapeutic drugs used to treat colon cancer, according to a study by researchers at the Institute for Biomedical Sciences at Georgia State University, the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Wenzhou Medical University and Southwest University in China.

Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer among men and women in the United States, and the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men and women worldwide. The incidence of colorectal cancer has increased over the last few years, with about one million new cases diagnosed annually. Non-targeted chemotherapy is the most common therapeutic strategy available for colon cancer patients, but this treatment method is unable to distinguish between cancerous and healthy cells, leading to poor therapeutic effects on tumor cells and severe toxic side effects on healthy cells. Enabling chemotherapeutic drugs to target cancer cells would be a major development in the treatment of colon cancer.

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