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Archive for the ‘physics’ category: Page 260

Dec 9, 2013

NASA Working on Faster-Than-Light Space Travel

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

By

warp drive

Well, maybe Star Trek isn’t really that far away. An announcement a few months ago from physicist Harold White surprised many in the space community. White claimed that he and a NASA team were working on developing faster than light warp drive.

White spoke to website io9 last month to explain the project, which combines Einstein’s theory of relativity, the latest in science and a touch of science fiction.

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Nov 30, 2013

Supermanagement!

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, complex systems, economics, education, engineering, ethics, existential risks, finance, futurism, geopolitics, information science, physics, robotics/AI, science, singularity, sustainability, transparency

Supermanagement! by Mr. Andres Agostini (Excerpt)

DEEPEST

“…What distinguishes our age from every other is not the world-flattening impact of communications, not the economic ascendance of China and India, not the degradation of our climate, and not the resurgence of ancient religious animosities. Rather, it is a frantically accelerating pace of change…”


Read the entire piece at http://lnkd.in/bYP2nDC

Nov 14, 2013

The Disruptional Singularity

Posted by in categories: business, climatology, complex systems, cosmology, counterterrorism, cybercrime/malcode, defense, economics, education, engineering, ethics, existential risks, finance, futurism, nanotechnology, physics, policy, robotics/AI, science, singularity, supercomputing, sustainability, transparency

(Excerpt)

Beyond the managerial challenges (downside risks) presented by the exponential technologies as it is understood in the Technological Singularity and its inherent futuristic forces impacting the present and the future now, there are also some grave global risks that many forms of management have to tackle with immediately.

These grave global risks have nothing to do with advanced science or technology. Many of these hazards stem from nature and some are, as well, man made.

For instance, these grave global risks ─ embodying the Disruptional Singularity ─ are geological, climatological, political, geopolitical, demographic, social, economic, financial, legal and environmental, among others. The Disruptional Singularity’s major risks are gravely threatening us right now, not later.

Read the full document at http://lnkd.in/bYP2nDC

Oct 22, 2013

100YSS A Success

Posted by in categories: education, events, fun, human trajectories, physics, scientific freedom, space

I am very pleased to say that the 2013 100YSS conference held in Houston, TX, was a success. I met a lot of like minded people — people who want to make interstellar travel a reality — though we differ in our opinions of when.

I was especially pleased to be able to visit with Mae Jemison, Jill Tarter and Pamela Contag. These three are amazing, shepherding us along. Shepherding us? Yes, are a loose collection of visionaries going every which way.

Mae Jemison
Jill Tarter
Pamela Contag

Oct 10, 2013

There is this wonderful German-language Report on the Higgs Boson and the LHC

Posted by in categories: existential risks, physics

http://www.ardmediathek.de/wdr-fernsehen/quarks-und-co/quark…d=17482362

I learned from it about the unfathomable degree of social coherence among the many thousand scientists and engineers whose synergy makes this largest constructive effort of humankind since the pyramids possible. And it also revealed the wonderful spirit of Peter Higgs who is a loving mind in the old sense of a devout scientist.

Ranga Yogeshwar here made it clear to me for the first time WHY this brave community could not respond to a novelty that would have destroyed their cohesion. The effort was too big to be disturbed even for a few days of “second thoughts.” For that it was too late from the beginning.

So CERN’s public refusal to update its “safety report” for more than 5 years is part and parcel of the beauty of the new pyramid (the word means “immortality”). Imagine the pyramids’ construction having been disturbed by a news that interfered with its political and divine purpose: This would have meant the end of the whole effort and the civilization behind it.

Continue reading “There is this wonderful German-language Report on the Higgs Boson and the LHC” »

Sep 17, 2013

Space-Mining For Our Fastest Depleting Resource: Helium

Posted by in categories: economics, engineering, futurism, physics, robotics/AI, space, sustainability

Most of us know helium as that cheap inert lighter-than-air gas we use to fill party balloons and inhale to increase voice-pitch as a party trick for kids. However, helium has much more important uses to humanity — from medical (e.g. MRIs), military and defense (submarine detectors use liquid helium to clean up noisy signals), next-generation nuclear reactors, space shuttles, solar telescopes, infra-red equipment, diving, arc welding, particle physics research (the super-magnets in particle colliders rely on liquid helium), the manufacture of many digital devices, growing silicon crystals, the production of LCDs and optical fibers [1].

The principal reason helium is so important is due to its ultra-low boiling-point and inert nature making it the ultimate coolant of the human race. As the isotope helium-3, helium is also used in nuclear fusion research [2]. However, our Earth supplies of helium are being used at an unprecedented rate and could be depleted within a generation [4] and at the current rate of consumption we will run out within 25 to 30 years. As the gas is often thought of as a cheap gas it is often wasted. However, those who understand the situation, such as Prof Richardson, co-chair of a recent US National Research Council inquiry into the coming helium shortage, warn that the gas is not cheap due to the supply being inexhaustible, but because of the Helium Privatisation Act passed in 1996 by the US Congress.

Helium only accounts for 0.00052% of the Earth’s atmosphere and the majority of the helium harvested comes from beneath the ground being extracted from minerals or tapped gas deposits. This makes it one of the rarest elements of any form on the planet. However, the Act required the helium stores [4] held underground near Amarillo in Texas to be sold off at a fixed rate by 2015 regardless of the market value, to pay off the original cost of the reserve. The Amarillo storage facility holds around half the Earth’s stocks of helium: around a billion cubic meters of the gas. The US currently supplies around 80 percent of the world’s helium supplies, and once this supply is exhausted one can expect the cost of the remaining helium on Earth to increase rapidly — as this is in all practicality quite a non-renewable resource.

There is no chemical way of manufacturing helium, and the supplies we have originated in the very slow radioactive alpha decay that occurs in rocks. It has taken 4.7 billion years for the Earth to accumulate our helium reserves, which we will have exhausted within about a hundred years of the US’s National Helium Reserve having been established in 1925. When this helium is released to the atmosphere, in helium balloons for example, it is lost forever — eventually escaping into space [5][6]. So what shall we do when this crucial resource runs out? Well, in some cases liquid nitrogen (−195°C) may be adopted as a replacement — but in many cases liquid nitrogen cannot be used as a stand alone coolant as tends to be trickier to work with (triple point and melting point at around −210°C) — so the liquid helium is used because it is capable of staying liquid at the extreme cool temperatures required. No more helium means no more helium liquid (−269°C) that is used to cool the NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance apparels), and in other machines such as MRI scanners. One wonders therefore must we look towards space exploration to replenish our most rare of resources on Earth?

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Aug 26, 2013

From New Physics to New Weapons Technologies

Posted by in categories: cosmology, defense, engineering, general relativity, military, particle physics, physics, space

My paper “New Evidence, Conditions, Instruments & Experiments for Gravitational Theories” was finally published by the Journal of Modern Physics, Vol. 8A, 2013. That is today Aug 26, 2013.

Over the last several years I had been compiling a list of inconsistencies in modern contemporary physics. This paper documents 12 inconsistencies. If I’m correct there will sooner or later, be a massive rewrite of modern physical theories, because I do not just criticize contemporary theories but critique them, i.e. provide positive suggestions based on empirical data, on how our theories need to be modified.

The upshot of all this is that I was able to propose two original, new experiments, never before contemplated in physics journals. Both involve new experimental devices, and one is so radically new that it is unthinkable. This is the gravity wave *telescope*.

The new physics lends itself to a new and different forms of weaponizations achievable within the next few decades, with technologies *not* predicted in science fiction. How about that?

Continue reading “From New Physics to New Weapons Technologies” »

Aug 25, 2013

The World-wide Science Quiz

Posted by in category: physics

Is there an error in the following 6-point result?

When looking from the height of a GPS satellite down onto earth, you will notice six Einstein effects:
E1: The clocks worn by the people down there tick slower by Einstein’s gravitational redshift factor
E2: The photons arriving up here from down there have correspondingly less energy
E3: These photons had their lower energy on departure already, despite appearing normal locally down there
E4: All masses down there are reduced in their mass-energy content by the redshift factor, despite appearing normal locally down there
E5: All charges down there are reduced in their charge by the redshift factor, despite appearing normal locally down there
E6: All objects down there are linearly increased in their size by the reciprocal redshift factor, despite appearing normal locally down there

Background: Points E1, E2 are accepted since Einstein first proposed them in 1907. E3 was described by Julian Schwinger in his book “Einstein’s Legacy” of 1986 (on page 142). E4 follows from quantum-electrodynamics (“creation-annihilation operator”). E5 follows from the universal rest mass-to-charge ratio; it is in the literature since 2008 (see http://www.academicjournals.org/ajmcsr/PDF/pdf2012/Feb/9%20Feb/Rossler.pdf ). E6 follows from the “Bohr radius formula” of quantum mechanics; it was first mentioned in a PhD thesis submitted in 2005 (quoted in http://www.nonlinearscience.com/paper.php?pid=0000000148 ).
So far, no specialist in general relativity agrees publicly to the three new Einstein effects E4,E5,E6, but no one objects publicly, either. One reason for the silence is that E4,E5,E6 have yet to be incorporated into general relativity (a mammoth task). The main reason, however, is that E5 and E6 affect the safety of the LHC experiment at CERN. This is why your help is vitally needed to either smash or confirm points E4-E6.

Aug 15, 2013

My smoothest Pebbles

Posted by in category: physics

Science depends on lonely pebble-searching as Newton said and Einstein practiced. Close to a pebble found, there always lie equally shiny others according to Maxwell. I look forward to the reader kindly searching around one or the other of the 25

1) Cryodynamics – sister discipline to thermodynamics – exists, being valid for attractive inter-particle potentials

2) Concentric electron beams will cool hot spots in the ITER via cryodynamics (with A. Sanayei and I. Zelinka)

3) Spiral chaos (stimulated by Art Winfree)

Continue reading “My smoothest Pebbles” »

Aug 12, 2013

Micro Black Holes in the Taillights — Another Glance Back

Posted by in categories: existential risks, particle physics, physics

Recent discussions on the properties of micro-black-holes threw open sufficient question to reignite some interest in the subject (pardon to those exhausted of reading on the subject here at the Lifeboat Foundation). A claim made by physicists at the University of Innsbruck in Austria, that a new attractive force arises from black-body radiation [1] makes one speculate if a similar effect could result from hawking radiation theorized to be emitted from micro-black-holes. An unlikely scenario due to the very different nature supposed on hawking radiation and black-body radiation, but a curious thought none-the-less. If a light component of hawking radiation could replicate this net attractive force, accepted accretion and radiation rates could be revised to consider such new additional forces hypothesized.

Not so fast — Even if such a new force did take effect in these scenarios, one would expect such to have negligible impact on safety assurances. Official estimated accretion rates are many many orders of magnitude lower than estimated radiation rates — and are estimates which concur with observational evidence in the longevity of white-dwarf stars.

That is not to conclude such new forces are necessary to continue debate. Certain old disputed parameter ranges suggest different accretion rates relative to radiative rates which could bridge that vast breadth between such estimates, theorizing catastrophic outcomes [3] are not necessarily refuted by safety assurances — least on white-dwarf longevity.

Indeed a more pertinent point, that if equilibrium could manifest between radiation and accretion rates, micro-black-holes trapped in Earth’s gravitation could become persistent heat engines with considerable flux [2] to cause environmental concern in planetary heating.

Continue reading “Micro Black Holes in the Taillights — Another Glance Back” »