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Archive for the ‘mobile phones’ category: Page 128

Jul 18, 2016

‘Smart’ thread collects diagnostic data when sutured into tissue

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, computing, health, mobile phones, nanotechnology, wearables

Way cool! Your stitches monitors and reports your progress to your doctor/s.

BTW — In 1999, I told a guy from Diamond Intl. that the thread in our clothing would be able to do this in the next 15 to 20 years. He laughed at me; never say never.


For the first time, researchers led by Tufts University engineers have integrated nano-scale sensors, electronics and microfluidics into threads — ranging from simple cotton to sophisticated synthetics — that can be sutured through multiple layers of tissue to gather diagnostic data wirelessly in real time, according to a paper published online July 18 in Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The research suggests that the thread-based diagnostic platform could be an effective substrate for a new generation of implantable diagnostic devices and smart wearable systems.

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Jul 16, 2016

This Tablet-Toting Military Vest Is Actually a Giant Battery

Posted by in categories: energy, military, mobile phones

Smartphones and tablets are being used more frequently in the battlefield, and that means that battery power is more important than ever. Soldiers often carry spare battery chargers in the 90-pound combat packs they carry into war zones, but the batteries are often lost or broken. BAE Systems wants to help lighten the load with its new system that lets soldiers plug electronics directly into their clothing.

The BAE Systems Broadsword Spine is a harness that can be sewn into a soldiers vest, jacket, or belt that carries a battery pack and hides charging wires. The harness places the battery pack on the small of a soldier’s back and includes eight conductive fabric conduits that can be used to connect to a USB port.

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Jul 15, 2016

How to add a smartphone-controlled brain to your 3D printer for about fifty bucks

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, mobile phones, neuroscience

Pretty cool.


Ready for some buzzword salad? David Gewirtz combines OctoPrint with OctoPi on the Raspberry Pi to drive his LulzBot Mini 3D printer. It’s actually harder to say than to do. Read on to learn how.

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Jul 13, 2016

17 Ways Technology Will Change Our Lives by 2050

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, space

Goodbye smartphones, hello space tourism. Here are 17 bold predictions about the future from a futurist with an 85% accuracy track record.

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Jul 11, 2016

Atomic bits despite zero-point energy? Jülich scientists explore novel ways of developing stable nanomagnets

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, nanotechnology, particle physics, quantum physics

Stable nanomagnets that ultimately improves data storage on the smallest of devices.


Abstract: So-called “zero-point energy” is a term familiar to some cinema lovers or series fans; in the fictional world of animated films such as “The Incredibles” or the TV series “Stargate Atlantis”, it denotes a powerful and virtually inexhaustible energy source. Whether it could ever be used as such is arguable. Scientists at Jülich have now found out that it plays an important role in the stability of nanomagnets. These are of great technical interest for the magnetic storage of data, but so far have never been sufficiently stable. Researchers are now pointing the way to making it possible to produce nanomagnets with low zero-point energy and thus a higher degree of stability (Nano Letters, DOI: 10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b01344).

Since the 1970s, the number of components in computer chips has doubled every one to two years, their size diminishing. This development has made the production of small, powerful computers such as smart phones possible for the first time. In the meantime, many components are only about as big as a virus and the miniaturization process has slowed down. This is because below approximately a nanometre, a billionth of a meter in size, quantum effects come into play. They make it harder, for example, to stabilise magnetic moments. Researchers worldwide are looking for suitable materials for magnetically stable nanomagnets so that data can be stored safely in the smallest of spaces.

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Jul 11, 2016

This startup wants to replace the silicon in your smartphone with diamonds

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, biotech/medical, mobile phones

Synthetic diamonds and the manufacturing of diamonds in mass quantity (including 3D Printing) is going to explode over the next few years with QC, Medical devices and technologies, smartphones, etc. Again, I hope Intel, Nvidia, HP, Xerox, etc. are listening.


Chicago-based startup Akhan Semiconducton wants to replace the silicon found in most modern-day electronics with diamonds derived from methane gas.

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Jul 11, 2016

Researchers develop faster, precise silica coating process for quantum dot nanorods

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, nanotechnology, quantum physics

Faster and better method around Q-dots development which ultimately extends the quality of Quantum Dots plus mass production of Q-Dots is much faster through this new method. Hoping this causes the costs of new cameras, phone displays, monitors/ video displays are now able to be created more cheaply and in larger quantities.


Materials researchers at North Carolina State University have fine-tuned a technique that enables them to apply precisely controlled silica coatings to quantum dot nanorods in a day — up to 21 times faster than previous methods. In addition to saving time, the advance means the quantum dots are less likely to degrade, preserving their advantageous optical properties.

Quantum dots are nanoscale semiconductor materials whose small size cause them to have electron energy levels that differ from larger-scale versions of the same material. By controlling the size of the quantum dots, researchers can control the relevant energy levels — and those energy levels give quantum dots novel optical properties. These characteristics make quantum dots promising for applications such as opto-electronics and display technologies.

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Jul 9, 2016

BBC Knowledge Magazine Subscription, Digital Issues on Web, iPad, iPhone, Android, Tablet device, Windows 8 from Magzter

Posted by in category: mobile phones

Get your digital edition of BBC Knowledge Magazine subscriptions and digital issues online from Magzter. Buy, download and read BBC Knowledge Magazine on your iPad, iPhone, Android, Tablets, Kindle Fire, Windows 8, Web, Mac and PCs only from Magzter — The Digital Newsstand.

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Jul 9, 2016

Scientists simulate tiny bacteria-powered ‘windfarm’ to power micromachines

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones

A team of scientists from Oxford University has shown how the natural movement of bacteria could be harnessed to assemble and power microscopic ‘windfarms’ — or other man-made micromachines such as smartphone components.

The study, published in the journal Science Advances (“Active micromachines: Microfluidics powered by mesoscale turbulenceence”), uses computer simulations to demonstrate that the chaotic swarming effect of dense active matter such as bacteria can be organised to turn cylindrical rotors and provide a steady power source.

Scientists simulate tiny bacteria-powered windfarm

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Jul 8, 2016

Inside Microsoft’s plan to outsmart Google

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, habitats, internet, mobile phones, robotics/AI

Satya Nadella bounded into the conference room, eager to talk about intelligence. I was at Microsoft’s headquarters in Redmond, WA, and the company’s CEO was touting the company’s progress in building more intelligent apps and services. Each morning, he told me, he puts on a HoloLens, which enables him to look at a virtual, interactive calendar projected on a wall of his house. Nadella appeared giddy as he described it. The system was intelligent, productive, and futuristic: everything he hopes Microsoft will be under his leadership.

No matter where we work in the future, Nadella says, Microsoft will have a place in it. The company’s “conversation as a platform” offering, which it unveiled in March, represents a bet that chat-based interfaces will overtake apps as our primary way of using the internet: for finding information, for shopping, and for accessing a range of services. And apps will become smarter thanks to “cognitive APIs,” made available by Microsoft, that let them understand faces, emotions, and other information contained in photos and videos.

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