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Archive for the ‘military’ category: Page 4

Sep 11, 2019

Smart sensor network helps redirect missile

Posted by in categories: military, robotics/AI

ARLINGTON, Va. — The Army successfully tested its ability to redirect munitions in flight Aug. 28 in an experiment over the Mohave Desert involving an unmanned aircraft, smart sensors and artificial intelligence.

It was the “signature experiment for FY19” said Brig. Gen. Walter T. Rugen, director of the Future Vertical Lift Cross-Functional Team, speaking Thursday at the Association of the U.S. Army’s “Hot Topic” forum on aviation.

The experiment at Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, California, tested a capability developed by his CFT called A3I, standing for Architecture, Automation, Autonomy and Interfaces.

Sep 10, 2019

Can DARPA CREATE an AI for unmanned-unmanned teaming?

Posted by in categories: military, robotics/AI

A new opportunity would fund development of an AI framework to coordinate actions between a mix of machines on the battlefield.

Sep 9, 2019

Russian x-risks newsletter, summer 2019

Posted by in categories: existential risks, military, policy

This is the first Russian x-risks newsletter, which will present news about Russia and global catastrophic risks from the last 3 months.

Given the combination of high technological capabilities, poor management, high risk tolerance and attempts to catch up with West and China in the military sphere, Russia is prone to technological catastrophes. It has a 10 times higher level of aviation catastrophes and car accidents than developed countries.

Thus it seems possible that a future global catastrophe may be somehow connected with Russia. However, most of the work in global catastrophic and existential risk (x-risks) prevention and policy efforts are happening in the West, especially in US, UK and Sweden. Even the best policies adopted by the governments of these countries may not help if a catastrophe occurs in another country or countries.

Sep 8, 2019

As computers play a bigger role in warfare, the dangers to humans rise

Posted by in categories: military, robotics/AI

T HE CONTEST between China and America, the world’s two superpowers, has many dimensions, from skirmishes over steel quotas to squabbles over student visas. One of the most alarming and least understood is the race towards artificial-intelligence-enabled warfare. Both countries are investing large sums in militarised artificial intelligence (AI), from autonomous robots to software that gives generals rapid tactical advice in the heat of battle. China frets that America has an edge thanks to the breakthroughs of Western companies, such as their successes in sophisticated strategy games. America fears that China’s autocrats have free access to copious data and can enlist local tech firms on national service. Neither side wants to fall behind.

Sep 4, 2019

How DARPA’s Twitter Account Leans Into Its Mad-Scientist Reputation

Posted by in category: military

When the secretive military technology agency asked for help finding an underground tunnel system for “experimentation,” Twitter went wild.

Sep 4, 2019

What the new arms race will look like in a post-INF world

Posted by in categories: geopolitics, military, treaties

Washington ending the INF arms control treaty has raised fears of a new “arms race.” This time it will be about more than just missiles, with China presenting strong competition to the US and Russia, a military expert tells RT.

Last week’s test of a ground-launched Tomahawk cruise missile showed that the US is eager to field a system banned by the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, even as it accused Russia – without offering evidence – of being in violation as a pretext to rip up the 1987 pact.

Russian President Vladimir Putin has ordered a “symmetrical response” to this threat, citing the presence of US launchers in Poland and Romania. Meanwhile, the Russian delegation to the UN has warned that the US actions have brought the world “just one step away from an uncontrolled arms race.”

Sep 4, 2019

Revealed: How a secret Dutch mole aided the U.S.-Israeli Stuxnet cyberattack on Iran

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cybercrime/malcode, military

For years, an enduring mystery has surrounded the Stuxnet virus attack that targeted Iran’s nuclear program: How did the U.S. and Israel get their malware onto computer systems at the highly secured uranium-enrichment plant?

The first-of-its-kind virus, designed to sabotage Iran’s nuclear program, effectively launched the era of digital warfare and was unleashed some time in 2007, after Iran began installing its first batch of centrifuges at a controversial enrichment plant near the village of Natanz.

The courier behind that intrusion, whose existence and role has not been previously reported, was an inside mole recruited by Dutch intelligence agents at the behest of the CIA and the Israeli intelligence agency, the Mossad, according to sources who spoke with Yahoo News.

Sep 4, 2019

ESA Spacecraft Sidesteps Collision With SpaceX Satellite

Posted by in categories: military, satellites

According to media reports, SpaceX refused to move its satellite even after it was alerted by the US military, which monitors space traffic.

ESA Spacecraft Sidesteps Collision With SpaceX Satellite

Sep 3, 2019

Marine grunts are testing high-tech glasses that give an F-35-like view of the battlefield

Posted by in category: military

Editor’s Note: This article by Matthew Cox originally appeared on Military.com, a leading source of news for the military and veteran community.

Marine infantrymen may soon be able to see through the floor of an MV-22 Osprey and track terrain features as they approach their attack objective.

It sounds like science fiction, but Marine Lt. Col. Rory Quinn of the Pentagon’s Close Combat Lethality Task Force says it could become reality if the Marine Corps decides to field the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS), a sophisticated Microsoft technology that the Army is developing to give soldiers a new level of situational awareness in combat.

Sep 3, 2019

Coming Soon to a Battlefield: Robots That Can Kill

Posted by in categories: government, military, robotics/AI

Tomorrow’s wars will be faster, more high-tech, and less human than ever before. Welcome to a new era of machine-driven warfare.

W allops Island —a remote, marshy spit of land along the eastern shore of Virginia, near a famed national refuge for horses—is mostly known as a launch site for government and private rockets. But it also makes for a perfect, quiet spot to test a revolutionary weapons technology.

If a fishing vessel had steamed past the area last October, the crew might have glimpsed half a dozen or so 35-foot-long inflatable boats darting through the shallows, and thought little of it. But if crew members had looked closer, they would have seen that no one was aboard: The engine throttle levers were shifting up and down as if controlled by ghosts. The boats were using high-tech gear to sense their surroundings, communicate with one another, and automatically position themselves so, in theory, .50-caliber machine guns that can be strapped to their bows could fire a steady stream of bullets to protect troops landing on a beach.

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