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Archive for the ‘habitats’ category: Page 15

Sep 30, 2020

Life On Venus — How Could It Have Gotten There?

Posted by in categories: alien life, habitats

Does phosphine and other signs indicate life in the clouds of Venus? If so how did it get there? Did life originate on Venus? Did Earth life originate on Venus? What is Panspermia?

You can support Galactic Gregs by supporting the sister channel Green Gregs by clicking the links below:
See the Special Deals at My Patriot Supply: www.PrepWithGreg.com
For gardening in your Lunar habitat Galactic Gregs has teamed up with True Leaf Market to bring you a great selection of seed for your planting. Check it out: http://www.pntrac.com/t/TUJGRklGSkJGTU1IS0hCRkpIRk1K

Sep 30, 2020

Cruise Crews and ISS News

Posted by in categories: entertainment, habitats, space travel

Cruise to cruise to crew the International Space Station (ISS) to film a movie in space! The latest on the leak being isolated (almost found), ISS debris dodging, Chinese challenge to ISS with their own ISS, and two crew launches to ISS and a cargo launch this month. Also see how the ISS commercial crew and cargo programs have played a strong role in spurring further space development and settlement to include SpaceX’s Starship program with ambitions to settle Mars!

You can support Galactic Gregs by supporting the sister channel Green Gregs by clicking the links below:
See the Special Deals at My Patriot Supply: www.PrepWithGreg.com
For gardening in your Lunar habitat Galactic Gregs has teamed up with True Leaf Market to bring you a great selection of seed for your planting. Check it out: http://www.pntrac.com/t/TUJGRklGSkJGTU1IS0hCRkpIRk1

Sep 25, 2020

Ring Always Home Cam can fly around

Posted by in category: habitats

Amazon’s smart home webcam can fly around to guard your house.

Sep 21, 2020

A New Space Habitat Design Simulates Gravity

Posted by in categories: habitats, space

The idea is to make space livable for everyday folks rather than only specially-trained astronauts.

Sep 5, 2020

Giant 3D-printer builds a TWO-STORY house in one piece

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

We can print houses now. And windmills. And swimming pools.

Sep 4, 2020

This is Ikea 2.0

Posted by in category: habitats

Inside Ikea’s big bet on smart home tech via The Verge.

Aug 29, 2020

Jacques Cousteau’s Grandson Wants to Build the International Space Station of the Sea

Posted by in category: habitats

Off the coast of Curaçao, at a depth of 60 feet, aquanaut Fabien Cousteau is looking to create the world’s largest underwater research habitat.

Aug 29, 2020

Ancient gene family protects algae from salt and cold in an Antarctic lake

Posted by in categories: genetics, habitats

Glycerol, used in the past as antifreeze for cars, is produced by a range of organisms from yeasts to vertebrates, some of which use it as an osmoprotectant—a molecule that prevents dangerous water loss in salty environments—while others use it as an antifreeze. Here, scientists from the University of Nevada and Miami University in Ohio show that two species of the single-celled green algae Chlamydomonas from Antarctica, called UWO241 and ICE-MDV, produce high levels of glycerol to protect them from osmotic water loss, and possibly also from freezing injury. Presently, only one other organism, an Arctic fish, is known to use glycerol for both purposes. Both species synthesize glycerol with enzymes encoded by multiple copies of a recently discovered ancient gene family. These results, published today in the open-access journal Frontiers in Plant Science, illustrate the importance of adaptations that allow life to not only survive but to thrive in extreme habitats.

The researchers collected both Chlamydomonas species from depths of 13 to 17 m, a region with a steep salinity gradient, in Lake Bonney, a permanently ice-covered lake in the McMurdo Dry Valleys of Victoria Land, Antarctica. Previously, they showed that both species are remarkably adapted to their extreme habitat, with a photosynthetic apparatus adapted to cold, saline, and light-poor conditions, novel proteins, more fluid cell membranes that function at low temperatures, and ice-binding proteins that protect against freeze-thaw injury.

“Our overall goal is to understand how microorganisms survive in extreme environments. The Chlamydomonas species of Lake Bonney are well-suited for such studies because they are exposed to many extremes, including low light, low temperature, oxidative stress, and high salinity. The present results are the first to show that glycerol production by microorganisms, which is well-known in warm, salty environments, is also important in polar regions,” says corresponding author Dr. James Raymond, Adjunct Research Professor at the School of Life Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, USA.

Aug 26, 2020

Can you make AI fairer than a judge? Play our courtroom algorithm game

Posted by in categories: habitats, information science, robotics/AI

As a child, you develop a sense of what “fairness” means. It’s a concept that you learn early on as you come to terms with the world around you. Something either feels fair or it doesn’t.

But increasingly, algorithms have begun to arbitrate fairness for us. They decide who sees housing ads, who gets hired or fired, and even who gets sent to jail. Consequently, the people who create them—software engineers—are being asked to articulate what it means to be fair in their code. This is why regulators around the world are now grappling with a question: How can you mathematically quantify fairness?

This story attempts to offer an answer. And to do so, we need your help. We’re going to walk through a real algorithm, one used to decide who gets sent to jail, and ask you to tweak its various parameters to make its outcomes more fair. (Don’t worry—this won’t involve looking at code!)

Continue reading “Can you make AI fairer than a judge? Play our courtroom algorithm game” »

Aug 25, 2020

Artificial Intelligence Will Surveil And Study Released Prisoners

Posted by in categories: habitats, internet, robotics/AI

Artificial intelligence applications are popping up everywhere these days, from our Internet browsing to smart homes and self-driving cars. Now a group of researchers is launching a new AI-led study that will collect data from recently released prisoners. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify – and, ostensibly, one day eliminate – the psychological and physiological triggers that cause recidivism among parolees.

According to project-leads Marcus Rogers and Umit Karabiyik, the resulting data will assist them in conducting a forensic psychological analysis. While the monitoring will be gauged in intervals – not real-time – they believe it will help build a profile of the risky behaviors and stressful triggers that recent parolees face when returning to the outside world.

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