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Oct 25, 2016

Soon, print your own smart tattoos, wearable fitness trackers

Posted by in categories: computing, wearables

Nice.


Scientists have created an inexpensive technique to print “data skin” — soft wearable electronics — paving way for smart tattoos that can be customised and printed at home.

Researchers created a fully functional “data skin” in under an hour. Since the method is based on inexpensive processing tools and materials, the circuits can be produced for less than a dollar.

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Oct 25, 2016

Breakthrough soft electronics fabrication method is a first step to DIY smart tattoos

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, wearables

Imagine if your electronic wearable device, like your Fitbit, adhered to you like a sticker or temporary tattoo and could read your pulse or measure hand gestures. As electronics are becoming thinner, lighter, and more power efficient, they can be populated on stickers and temporary tattoos to create soft wearables that adhere to the skin. And the most exciting news is that one day you may be able to print these wearable electronics from a home printer.

Carnegie Mellon University’s Mechanical Engineering Professor Carmel Majidi, Ph.D. student Eric Markvicka, and previous postdoctoral fellow Michael Bartlett (now a professor at Iowa State University) have created a method to print skin-mountable electronics in a quick and cost-effective way.

“One of the remaining challenges in skin-mounted electronics is to interface soft circuits with the rigid microchips and electronics hardware required for sensing, digital processing, and power,” said Majidi. “We address this with a breakthrough digital fabrication technique that enables efficient creation of wireless electronics on a soft, water-resistant, medical-grade adhesive.”

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Oct 25, 2016

The exciting new age of quantum computing

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, encryption, military, quantum physics, security, space travel

What does the future hold for computing? Experts at the Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub (NQIT), based at Oxford University, believe our next great technological leap lies in the development of quantum computing.

Quantum computers could solve problems it takes a conventional computer longer than the lifetime of the universe to solve. This could bring new possibilities, such as advanced drug development, superior military intelligence, greater opportunities for and enhanced encryption security.

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Oct 25, 2016

QST And Osaka To Collaborate On Quantum And Radiological Research

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Based on the conclusion of this agreement, QST and Osaka University will greatly contribute to the promotion of science, technology and academia, and the creation of innovation in a variety of different fields. The institutes will create a new framework for collaboration and cooperation through the use of the research and development ability, state-of-the-art facilities, and human resources.

In addition, under this agreement, QST Kansai Photon Science Institute and the Osaka University Institute of Laser Engineering have simultaneously concluded a memorandum for cooperation in light and quantum beam science.

It is hoped that the development and utilization research of internationally-competitive power lasers will be greatly accelerated through systematic collaboration.

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Oct 25, 2016

Scientists Generate the Fastest Electric Current Ever Measured Inside a Solid Material

Posted by in categories: computing, mobile phones, particle physics, quantum physics

Using ultrafast laser flashes, physicists from the Max Planck Institute have generated the fastest electric current that has ever been measured inside a solid material.

In the field of electronics, the principle ‘the smaller, the better’ applies. Some building blocks of computers or mobile phones, however, have become nearly as small today as only a few atoms. It is therefore hardly possible to reduce them any further.

Another factor for the performance of electronic devices is the speed at which electric currents oscillate. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics have now created electric currents inside solids which exceed the frequency of visible light by more than ten times They made electrons in silicon dioxide oscillate with ultrafast laser pulses. The conductivity of the material which is typically used as an insulator was increased by more than 19 orders of magnitude.

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Oct 25, 2016

From the X-Files Dept: “Quantum Tunneling May Trigger Destruction of the Cosmos” (VIEW VIDEO)

Posted by in categories: existential risks, particle physics, quantum physics

Oh boy!


Space vacuum that appears to be stable due to the complete absence of substance in it, is likely to be fraught with great danger. The idea about the destruction of the universe is based on the hypothesis of vacuum instability. Any system in our world has a certain amount of potential energy. But, space vacuum is not as empty as it may seem to be. Vacuum in space is filled with quantum particles, which, in turn, may seek their own “stability” to annihilate the material world in its entirety during the process.

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Oct 25, 2016

Iridescent Leaves Take Advantage Of Quantum Mechanics To Thrive In The Shade

Posted by in category: quantum physics

A shiny solution.

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Oct 25, 2016

Beyond Moore’s Law: 13 Investors, CEOs, And Researchers Sound Off On Quantum Computing

Posted by in categories: computing, finance, quantum physics, robotics/AI

A nice read on the who’s who in QC: congrats Vern Brownell and Michelle S. in making the top 13 list.


Leaders in quantum computing discuss the challenges and potential for this technology across finance, AI, and many other fields.

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Oct 25, 2016

Scientists slam carbon out of diamonds to create the first quantum computing bridge

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

What happens when you knock the carbon out of diamonds? You end up maintaining 100 percent quantum integrity; therefore, you can now transmit multitude of Qubits together over a long distance instead of 1 Qubit in one transmission and among multiple QC Devices.


New breakthrough paves the way for the first practical quantum computers

Quantum computers are a reality but unlike the first traditional computers, which were large enough to fill a room, most of today’s quantum computers are very small with one, five, or even 16 qubits at their core and getting to the point where we have a truly practical quantum computer is going to require component by component advances until, one day, we get to the point where all of the blocks “just work”.

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Oct 25, 2016

The Universe

Posted by in category: space

Click on photo to start video.

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