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Feb 12, 2018

Do not go baldly into that good night

Posted by in category: life extension

A scientist gets to the roots of hair loss in a study published at the end of January, saying baldness is due to metabolic changes and free radical damage – and suggests ways to solve the problem. [This article first appeared on LongevityFacts. Author: Brady Hartman. ]

Why We Grow Bald

Scientists have identified at least nine mechanisms that underly the aging process, the so-called hallmarks of aging. While there are many factors that contribute to baldness, including hormonal changes, two of these hallmarks have been implicated in age-related hair loss in women in a study published in late January of this year.

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Feb 12, 2018

First high-precision measurement of the mass of the W boson at the LHC

Posted by in category: particle physics

Display of a candidate event for a W boson decaying into one muon and one neutrino from proton-proton collisions recorded by ATLAS with LHC stable beams at a collision energy of 7 TeV. (Image: CERN In a paper published today in the European Physical Journal C, the ATLAS Collaboration reports the first high-precision measurement at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of the mass of the W boson. This is one of two elementary particles that mediate the weak interaction – one of the forces that govern the behaviour of matter in our universe. The reported result gives a value of 80370±19 MeV for th…

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Feb 12, 2018

Scientists Rush to Explore Underwater World Hidden Below Ice for 120,000 Years

Posted by in category: futurism

And this month, a team of scientists will venture to the long-ice-buried expanse to investigate the mysterious ecosystem that was hidden beneath the Antarctic ice shelf for so long.

The newly exposed seabed stretches across an area of about 2,246 square miles (5,818 square kilometers), according to the British Antarctic Survey (BAS), which is leading the expedition. The scientists consider their journey “urgent,” as they hope to document the system before sunlight begins to change at least the surface layers. [In Photos: Antarctica’s Larsen C Ice Shelf Through Time]

“The calving of [iceberg] A-68 [from the Larsen C Ice Shelf] provides us with a unique opportunity to study marine life as it responds to a dramatic environmental change. It’s important we get there quickly before the undersea environment changes as sunlight enters the water and new species begin to colonize,” Katrin Linse, of the British Antarctic Survey, said in a statement.

Continue reading “Scientists Rush to Explore Underwater World Hidden Below Ice for 120,000 Years” »

Feb 12, 2018

Acoustic imaging reveals hidden features of megathrust fault off Costa Rica

Posted by in category: futurism

Perspective view of the shallow megathrust looking seaward towards the trench; the frontal prism has been cut away. The color scales indicate depth below seafloor, and grey denotes the seafloor. Credit: Edwards et al., Nature Geoscience, Feb-2018 Geophysicists have obtained detailed three-dimensional images of a dangerous megathrust fault west of Costa Rica where two plates of the Earth’s crust collide. The images reveal features of the fault surface, including long grooves or corrugations, that may determine how the fault will slip in an earthquake. The study, published February 12 in Natu…

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Feb 12, 2018

Portable Atomic Clock Makes First Measurement

Posted by in category: futurism

With a new, “portable” atomic clock, scientists are measuring not what time it is but changes to time itself.

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Feb 12, 2018

Engineering and Physical Sciences Photography Competition 2018

Posted by in category: engineering

12 Feb 2018 Engineering and Physical Sciences Photography Competition 2018 Previous slideNext slide1 of 16View AllSkip Ad Second place in the Weird and Wonderful category This picture of Placental ‘Pop Art’ has won Second place in the Weird and Wonderful category of the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council’s annual photography competition. These images show automatically segmented chorionic vascular trees obtained from high resolution photography. Dr Rosalind Aughwane/UCL/EPSRC/PA Back to image.

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Feb 12, 2018

Microscopy breakthrough paves the way for atomically precise manufacturing

Posted by in categories: innovation, materials

A University of Texas at Dallas graduate student, his advisor and industry collaborators believe they have addressed a long-standing problem troubling scientists and engineers for more than 35 years: How to prevent the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope from crashing into the surface of a material during imaging or lithography. Details of the group’s solution appeared in the January issue of the journal Review of Scientific Instruments, which is published by the American Institute of Physics. Scanning tunneling microscopes (STMs) operate in an ultra-high vacuum, bringing a fine-tipped p…

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Feb 12, 2018

‘Oumuamua had a violent past and has been tumbling around for billions of years

Posted by in category: space travel

The first discovered interstellar visitor to our solar system has had a violent past, which is causing it to tumble around chaotically, a Queen’s University Belfast scientist has discovered.

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Feb 12, 2018

Hearing implant uses lasers to shoot sound into your ear

Posted by in category: futurism

Using lasers instead of electrodes to vibrate the hairs in the inner ears could lead to less damaging cochlear implants.

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Feb 12, 2018

This Robot Can Open Doors By Itself

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

It’s impressive, but it doesn’t seem that practical. Maybe a temporary solution while they get the cost of ATLAS down a lot, and get ATLAS equipped with human like hands.


In other news, this Boston Dynamics robot just learned how to open doors and let itself out: http://bit.ly/2EqgWN2

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