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Jan 15, 2019

The Weaponization Of Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: information science, military, robotics/AI

Amidst these complex security challenges and the sea of unknowns coming our way, what remains fundamental for the safety and security of the human race is the role of programmers and programming along with the integrity of semiconductor chips. The reason behind this is programmers can define and determine the nature of AWS (at least in the beginning) until AI begins to program itself.


Weaponized artificial intelligence is almost here. As algorithms begin to change warfare, the rise of autonomous weapons systems is becoming a terrifying reality.

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Jan 15, 2019

China’s seeds sprout on Moon, the first time any biological matter has grown there

Posted by in categories: biological, space

Life finds a way. 🌱🌕.

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Jan 15, 2019

Painless microneedle patch provides month-long contraception

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Contraceptives are rarely convenient – implanted devices are invasive, and you have to remember to take the pill every day. Now a team led by researchers at Georgia Tech are developing a painless, contraceptive microneedle patch that women can apply themselves in five seconds, and only needs to be done once a month.

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Jan 14, 2019

The NM is pleased to announce the reopening today of the National Museum Planetarium

Posted by in category: alien life

Please join us on our journey to the wonders of our Ethno astronomy, learning how planets and stars have guided us in sea navigation, agriculture, fishing and the right timing of celebrating life. We are open 10 am to 5 pm (last admission 4:30 pm), Tuesday to Sunday. Exhibition is free but we charge for planetarium shows (Php 50.00 for regular viewers, Php 30.00 for students with ID, and Php 40.00 for senior citizens and PWD). For more information, please call (02) 527 7889 or email [email protected].

#NationalMuseumPH

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Jan 14, 2019

Would You Zap Your Brain to Improve Your Memory?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Using a few wires and sponges, in ordinary homes around the world, people are trying to hack their own minds. Thanks to a 2002 study that found a link between brain transcranial direct current stimulation and better motor task performance, “do-it-yourself” brain stimulation has become a growing movement among those who want to improve a whole host of cognitive and psychological functions, including language skills, mood and memory.

Scientists are split about the practice: Some say that while brain stimulators might not work as advertised (the ones available to purchase can cost hundreds of dollars), these devices are more-or-less safe. Others think the technique could cause damage, even if done in a controlled, clinical setting. Though “brain hackers” may be disappointed with their own results, their hope about the technology’s potential is rooted in an increasing amount of evidence.

The earliest clinical uses of brain stimulation date back to nearly 2000 years ago, when physician Scribonius Largus recommended the use of electric rayfish to treat headaches and neuralgia. By the 1980s, researchers began designing non-invasive stimulators and brain implants for treating specific diseases. Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) — a non-invasive treatment that uses direct electrical currents to stimulate specific parts of the brain — has been shown, in a few small studies, to purportedly improve language skills, boost memory and strengthen reflexes. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), another non-invasive procedure, is sometimes used to treat depression. And clinical trials are underway to see if stimulating the brain can treat other medical conditions, such as Parkinson’s.

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Jan 14, 2019

Physicists Built a Machine That Breaks the Normal Rules of Light

Posted by in categories: military, physics

Physicists have built a ring in which pulses of light whip circles around each other and the normal rules that govern light’s behavior no longer apply.

Under normal circumstances, light displays certain kids of physical symmetry. First, if you were to play a tape of light’s behavior forward and then backward, you would see it behave in the same way moving in both directions in time. This is called time-reversal symmetry. And second, light, which can move through the world as a wave, has what is called polarization: how it oscillates relative to the motion of the wave. That polarization usually stays the same, providing another type of symmetry.

But inside this ring-shaped device, light both loses its time-reversal symmetry and changes its polarization. Inside the ring, light waves turn circles and resonate with one another, producing effects that don’t normally exist in the outside world. [The 10 Most Outrageous Military Experiments].

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Jan 14, 2019

A Silver Bullet Against the Brain-Eating Amoeba?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

The brain-eating monsters are real enough — they lurk in freshwater ponds in much of the United States. Now scientists may have discovered a new way to kill them.

Minuscule silver particles coated with anti-seizure drugs one day may be adapted to halt Naegleria fowleri, an exceptionally lethal microbe that invades through the sinuses and feeds on human brain tissue.

The research, published in the journal Chemical Neuroscience, showed that repurposing seizure medicines and binding them to silver might kill the amoebae while sparing human cells. Scientists hope the findings will lay an early foundation for a quick cure.

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Jan 14, 2019

This steam-powered spaceship could cruise the cosmos indefinitely without running out of gas

Posted by in category: space travel

Scientists say the microwave-sized craft would suck its watery fuel right out of the asteroids, planets and moons it’s exploring.

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Jan 14, 2019

A Surgeon Reflects On Death, Life And The ‘Incredible Gift’ Of Organ Transplant

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Fresh Air: Transplant Surgeon Joshua Mezrich On ‘When Death Becomes Life’ : Shots — Health News Joshua Mezrich has performed hundreds of kidney, liver and pancreas transplants. He shares stories from the operating room in his book, When Death Becomes Life.

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Jan 14, 2019

Researchers Discover a Way to Make 3D Printing 100 Times Faster

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Researchers at the University of Michigan have invented a new method of 3D printing which is up to 100 times faster than conventional existing 3D-printing processes. Here’s how it works, and why it could prove a game-changer for the way that 3D printing is currently used.

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