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Feb 21, 2024

The Brain Of Colonel Barham

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, space

“With the world growing more crowded, the great powers strive to conquer other planets. The race is on. The interplanetary sea has been charted; the first caravelle of space is being constructed. Who will get there first? Who will be the new Columbus?” A robot probe is being readied to explore the secrets of the red planet, Mars. The only component lacking: a human brain. No body. Just the brain. It is needed to deal with unexpected crises in the cold, dark depths of space. The perfect volunteer is found in Colonel Barham, a brilliant but hot-tempered astronaut dying of leukemia. But all goes awry as, stripped of his mortal flesh, Barham — or rather his disembodied brain — is consumed with a newly-found power to control…or destroy. Project psychiatrist Major McKinnon (Grant Williams) diagnoses the brain as having delusions of grandeur…but, just perhaps, Col. Barham has achieved grandeur.

Feb 21, 2024

New ‘supermolecule’ demonstrated for the first time at record-breaking ultracold temperature

Posted by in categories: chemistry, quantum physics

Largest polyatomic molecule created and stabilised at just above absolute zero provides new insights into quantum chemistry.

Feb 21, 2024

Self-propelling nanobots shrink bladder tumours in mice by 90%

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, nanotechnology

Imagine an army of self-propelling, radioisotope-covered particles 2,500 to 10,000 times smaller than a speck of dust that, upon injection into the body, search for and attach themselves to cancerous tumours, destroying them. Sounds like science fiction? Not so for mice with bladder cancer.

Researchers in Spain report that nanoparticles containing radioactive iodine and which propel themselves upon reaction with urea have the ability to distinguish cancerous bladder tumours from healthy tissue. These “nanobots” penetrate the tumour’s extracellular matrix and accumulate within it, enabling the radionuclide therapy to reach its precise target. In a study conducted at the Institute for Bioengineering of Catalonia (IBEC) in Barcelona, mice receiving a single dose of this treatment had a 90% reduction in the size of bladder tumours compared with untreated animals.

This novel approach may one day revolutionize the treatment of bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is the tenth most common cancer in the world, with over 600,000 new cases diagnosed in 2022 and more than 220,000 deaths globally, according to the World Health Organization’s Global Cancer Observatory.

Feb 21, 2024

Sweeping chronic fatigue study brings clues but not clarity to mysterious syndrome

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

“Megaworkup” revealed brain and immune differences in a small patient group.

Feb 21, 2024

Down syndrome identified in 2600-year-old infants through their DNA

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Study shows power of paleogenomics to explore incidence of disability in the past.

Feb 21, 2024

A new AI model called Morpheus-1 claims to induce lucid dreaming

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI

‘Inception’ is about to become a documentary — or are we all just dreaming?

Feb 21, 2024

Discovery may enable an Effective Long-Term Lupus Treatment

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Australian researchers have worked out how to fix a defect that causes lupus, and hope their world-first discovery will offer effective long-term treatment.

Published in Nature Communications, the Monash University-led study found a way to reprogram the defective cells of lupus patients with protective molecules from healthy people.

Using human cells, the new treatment restores the protective side of the immune system that prevents autoimmunity, which is when the immune system attacks its own cells.

Feb 21, 2024

Mimas’ surprise: Tiny Moon holds Young Ocean beneath Icy Shell

Posted by in categories: chemistry, space

Hidden beneath the heavily cratered surface of Mimas, one of Saturn’s smallest moons lies a secret: a global ocean of liquid water. This astonishing discovery, led by Dr. Valéry Lainey of the Observatoire de Paris-PSL and published in the journal Nature, reveals a “young” ocean formed just 5 to 15 million years ago, making Mimas a prime target for studying the origins of life in our solar system.

“Mimas is a small moon, only about 400 kilometers in diameter, and its heavily cratered surface gave no hint of the hidden ocean beneath,” says Dr. Nick Cooper, a co-author of the study and Honorary Research Fellow in the Astronomy Unit of the School of Physical and Chemical Sciences at Queen Mary University of London.

“This discovery adds Mimas to an exclusive club of moons with internal oceans, including Enceladus and Europa, but with a unique difference: its ocean is remarkably young, estimated to be only 5 to 15 million years old.”

Feb 21, 2024

New study finds ‘Sweet spot’ for Length of Yarn-shaped Supercapacitors

Posted by in categories: chemistry, energy, engineering, wearables

As interest in wearable technology has surged, research into creating energy-storage devices that can be woven into textiles has also increased. Researchers at North Carolina State University have now identified a “sweet spot” at which the length of a threadlike energy storage technology called a “yarn-shaped supercapacitor” (YSC) yields the highest and most efficient flow of energy per unit length.

“When it comes to the length of the YSC, it’s a tradeoff between power and energy,” said Wei Gao, corresponding author of a paper on the work and an associate professor of textile engineering, chemistry and science at NC State.

“It’s not only about how much energy you can store, but also the internal resistance we care about.”

Feb 21, 2024

Emergence (3).Pdf

Posted by in category: futurism

Weak and strong emergence by David Chalmers.


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