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Apr 20, 2019

Ultrasonic knife

Posted by in category: futurism

This knife uses ultrasonic waves to cut through virtually anything with ease.

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Apr 20, 2019

Your Own Personal Aircraft

Posted by in categories: futurism, transportation

This electric vehicle could become your future mode of transportation 😍 via @kittyhawkaero

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Apr 20, 2019

A Mars Colony Could Be Humanity’s First Shot at a Ground-Up, Pure Economy

Posted by in categories: economics, space

Matt Weinzierl is excited about the prospects.

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Apr 20, 2019

Ending Age-Related Diseases Conference: April Update

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, life extension

On July 11–12, we will be hosting our second annual Ending Age-Released Diseases conference. This conference focuses on the progress of aging research along with the business and investment side of rejuvenation biotechnology.

Aging research is on the cusp of some major breakthroughs in the battle against age-related diseases, and we invite you to join us for an action-packed event filled with exciting talks and discussion panels featuring some of the leaders of aging research and the biotech business.

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Apr 20, 2019

6G! Everything Tech You NEED to Know!

Posted by in category: futurism

Technology in today’s day and age progresses at an incredible speed! But did you know it moved THIS fast?

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Apr 20, 2019

3D molding

Posted by in category: 3D printing

Forget 3D-printing, molding is where it’s at.

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Apr 20, 2019

IBM Pulls the Plug on Drug-Discovering Watson AI

Posted by in categories: finance, robotics/AI

The program is reportedly ending due to “lackluster financial performance.”

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Apr 20, 2019

A psychology experiment unexpectedly discovered a man who can’t cooperate because of brain damage

Posted by in category: neuroscience

When someone’s especially cooperative, don’t thank their easy-going nature, but give credit to their brain. A team of New York University psychologists hypothesized that cooperation depends on the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DPC), an area of the brain in the frontal lobe involved in regulation control and goal pursuit; after all, cooperation often requires reigning in one’s naughty impulses to take everything for themselves. To test their theory, the researchers conducted an experiment involving participants with brain damage to the DPC—and discovered someone who would not cooperate at all.

For the study, published last year in the journal Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, the researchers recruited 26 healthy control participants alongside 33 participants with brain damage: eight who had frontal-lobe damage, 14 with amygdala damage, and 11 with damage in other areas of the brain. The participants were split into groups of four, and then put through 20 rounds of a decision-making scenario where each person was given $8 and told they could keep it for themselves, or share it equally with the group. After each round, the participants saw whether the others in their group chose to share. Overall, participants cooperated by sharing their money 38.5% of the time.

More interestingly, participants with damage to their DPC were more likely to keep the $8 for themselves. “Overcoming that intuition to be selfish requires them to regulate their response,” says Jay Van Bavel, a professor of psychology at NYU, and one of the study authors. “You just reach and grab for the money whenever you can take it. As people had more damage to their DPC, they were more likely to be selfish.”

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Apr 20, 2019

Light sails and stingray airships to explore space

Posted by in categories: innovation, space

NASA has announced the 18 projects awarded funding in its NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) programme.

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Apr 20, 2019

Almost one in ten heart attacks could be prevented if high-risk patients were checked more

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

Almost one in ten heart attacks and strokes could be avoided if check-ups were targeted at high risk patients, new research has revealed.

People aged 40 and over in England and Wales are currently eligible to have their heart health assessed every five years.

Blood pressure, cholesterol, blood-sugar levels, smoker status, age and family history are factors considered by doctors when working out a person’s chance of having a heart attack or stroke.

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