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Jul 4, 2019

Stem Cell Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Stem cell treatment offers hope for patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Jul 4, 2019

Doctor ‘cancer free’ after statin test

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

I cannot say that I am cured, but this might be something really interesting.


Dr Grace Gosar began following a medication and diet programme devised by a Staffordshire scientist.

Jul 4, 2019

A small reminder of the important difference between chronological ageing and biological ageing :)

Posted by in categories: biological, life extension

Read more

Jul 4, 2019

Buddhism And The Freedom of The Will

Posted by in categories: food, neuroscience, space

A South Indian philosopher sometimes called the “second Buddha,” Nagarjuna stands ambivalently at the beginnings of Mahayana philosophy. His arguments are subtle, sophisticated, and complex. Their interpretation is made more difficult because they are written as beautifully crafted quatrains whose density require extra concentration. As a transitional thinker, Nagarjuna is taken by some commentators (David Kalupahana and Jay Garfield) as continuing the Pali tradition and by others (Frederick Streng and T. Wood) as making a clean break with it. The latter school of interpretation reads Nagarjuna’s quatrains as thoroughly dialectical refutations of any positive thesis, even the minimalist claims of Pali realism. There is general consensus that the Yogacara school of Vasubandhu and Asanga reject Nagarjuna’s views, whatever they are, in favor of an objective idealism roughly similar to Hegel’s. Unfortunately, we do not have space to deal with Yogacara except only in an indirect way.

As we have seen, Pali Buddhists do not deny the appearance of an empirical self (jiva); rather, they deny that, corresponding to this appearance, there is anything enduring, separate, or independent. These may just be three different ways of saying the same thing, but since they represent three different types of Buddhist arguments, they merit separate presentations. First, there is no self that endures. What we see is constantly changing and there is nothing that stays the same. The traditional argument here proceeds by elimination: the physical bodies change; feelings, beliefs, desires, and intentions all change; consciousness is intermittent; and our self-conceptions change over time. None of the things we can point to as the self remains the same. Therefore the self does not endure. The argument is similar to the one given by Hume.

Second, the self is not separate from the causes and conditions that give rise to it. A standard metaphor for this comes from the Dhammapada, a Pali text from the 3rd century BCE. The appearance of a rainbow arises out of a certain combination of mist and light. Remove either one of these and the rainbow no longer exists. Similarly, the appearance of a self arises out of conditions: oxygen, food, parents, etc. Without them, there would be no self. This argument can be made on a general level, as just done, or on a particular level. You wouldn’t be the person you are if your family, friends, and acquaintances all weren’t the people they are, if you hadn’t had the experiences you’ve had, lived in the society you live in, etc. If we define the constellation of these conditions as one’s “world,” we can say that the self cannot be separated, either practically or logically, from the world in which it exists.

Jul 4, 2019

Japan is a world leader in floating solar power

Posted by in categories: solar power, space, sustainability

Solar panels that don’t occupy valuable land.


Saving space whilst saving the planet.

Jul 4, 2019

879% Drug Price Hike is One of 3,400 in 2019 so Far; Rate of Hikes Increasing

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

More funding your way would alleviate what he’s calling out.


Despite public and political pressure, pharma keeps on ratcheting up prices.

Jul 4, 2019

The reality behind solar power’s next star material

Posted by in categories: solar power, sustainability

For decades, slabs of crystalline silicon have dominated the solar industry. Other materials that can be layered in thin films, such as copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe), have captured less than 5% of the market, because it’s hard to make them as efficient or cheap as conventional solar panels. Perovskites could be a different story. They should be cheaper to make and seem impressively efficient at converting sunlight into electricity — in the laboratory, at least.


Companies say they are close to commercializing cheap perovskite films that could disrupt solar power — but are they too optimistic?

Jul 3, 2019

The Band-Aid of the future knows when you’re healed

Posted by in categories: futurism, wearables

It’s easy to imagine these wearable circuits on the shelves of CVS.

3 minute Read.

Jul 3, 2019

Physicists use light waves to accelerate supercurrents, enable ultrafast quantum computing

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Jigang Wang and his collaborators have demonstrated light-induced acceleration of supercurrents, which could enable practical applications of quantum mechanics such as computing, sensing and communicating. Larger image. Image courtesy of Jigang Wang.

AMES, Iowa – Jigang Wang patiently explained his latest discovery in quantum control that could lead to superfast computing based on quantum mechanics: He mentioned light-induced superconductivity without energy gap. He brought up forbidden supercurrent quantum beats. And he mentioned terahertz-speed symmetry breaking.

Jul 3, 2019

How Humans Will Bring the Internet to Space

Posted by in categories: habitats, space

In the future, orbiters, rovers, deep space probes, and even human space habitats will be nodes on the internet of things.