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May 31, 2019

“Peering Through Spacetime” –‘EHT Could Read a Newspaper in NYC from a Sidewalk Café in Berlin’

Posted by in category: cosmology

The first direct image of the M87 Galaxy’s supermassive black hole that’s almost the size of our solar system required telescopes of unprecedented precision and sensitivity to give the human species a look into the unknown. The realization of this telescope – the Event Horizon Telescope – was a formidable challenge which required upgrading and connecting a planet-scale network of eight pre-existing telescopes deployed at a variety of challenging high-altitude sites, including volcanoes in Hawaii and Mexico, mountains in Arizona and the Spanish Sierra Nevada, the Chilean Atacama Desert, and Antarctica.

We gave humanity its first view of a black hole — “a one-way door out of our universe,” said EHT project director Sheperd S. Doeleman of the Center for Astrophysics, of the image of the massive black hole at the center of elliptical galaxy M87 as it was 55 million years ago “This is a landmark in astronomy, an unprecedented scientific feat accomplished by a team of more than 200 researchers.”

“The gates of hell, the end of space and time.” That was how black holes were described at the press conference in Brussels where the first ever photograph of one was revealed. The black hole, a super-massive object at the center of M87 shown above, really is a monster, observed Ellie Mae O’Hagan for The Guardian. “Everything unfortunate enough to get too close to it falls in and never emerges again, including light itself. It’s the point at which every physical law of the known universe collapses. Perhaps it is the closest thing there is to hell: it is an abyss, a moment of oblivion.”

Continue reading “‘Peering Through Spacetime’ --‘EHT Could Read a Newspaper in NYC from a Sidewalk Café in Berlin’” »

May 31, 2019

E. Drexler, M. Miller, R. Hanson: Decentralized Approaches to AI Panel

Posted by in categories: alien life, economics, governance, nanotechnology, policy, robotics/AI

Extremely happy to be able to already share with you the two videos from our last salon🚀! We gathered not one but three individuals who have been pre-eminent luminaries in their fields for 30 years to discuss their alternative approaches to the current AI paradigm: Kim Eric Drexler, Robin Hanson, and Mark S. Miller.


Allison Duettmann (Foresight Institute) discusses alternative approaches to the current AI paradigm with three individuals who have been pre-eminent luminaries in their fields for 30 years: Eric Drexler, Robin Hanson, and Mark S. Miller.

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May 31, 2019

Google Just Gave 2 Billion Chrome Users A Reason To Switch To Firefox

Posted by in category: futurism

It starts slowly, until all the apps are absorbed and proposed for a price 👍.


Google has confirmed plans to restrict ad blockers, despite complaints. Here’s what you need to know.

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May 31, 2019

Aging Analytics Agency Photo 6

Posted by in category: life extension

Aging Analytics Agency has launched an interactive IT-platform alongside its “Longevity Industry in California Landscape Overview 2019” report that turns the report’s static mindmaps into dynamic and interactive infographics, enabling complex interactions between industry entities and stakeholders to be visualized, filtered, searched and thus more easily understood.

Link to IT-Platform: https://mindmaps.aginganalytics.com/longevity-industry-in-california.

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May 31, 2019

Fault-Tolerant Error Correction with Efficient Quantum Codes

Posted by in category: quantum physics

We exhibit a simple, systematic procedure for detecting and correcting errors using any of the recently reported quantum error-correcting codes. The procedure is shown explicitly for a code in which one qubit is mapped into five. The quantum networks obtained are fault tolerant, that is, they can function successfully even if errors occur during the error correction. Our construction is derived using a recently introduced group-theoretic framework for unifying all known quantum codes.

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May 31, 2019

Quantum gate teleportation between separated qubits in a trapped-ion processor

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Gating—controlling the state of one qubit conditioned on the state of another—is a key procedure in all quantum information processors. As the scale of quantum processors increases, the qubits will need to interact over larger and larger distances, which presents an experimental challenge in solid-state architectures. Wan et al. implemented the 20-year-old theoretical proposal of quantum gate teleportation that allows separated qubits to interact effectively. They deterministically teleported a controlled-NOT gate between two computational qubits in spatially separated zones in a segmented ion trap, demonstrating a feasible route toward scalable quantum information processors.

Science, this issue p. 875

Large-scale quantum computers will require quantum gate operations between widely separated qubits. A method for implementing such operations, known as quantum gate teleportation (QGT), requires only local operations, classical communication, and shared entanglement. We demonstrate QGT in a scalable architecture by deterministically teleporting a controlled-NOT (CNOT) gate between two qubits in spatially separated locations in an ion trap. The entanglement fidelity of our teleported CNOT is in the interval (0.845, 0.872) at the 95% confidence level. The implementation combines ion shuttling with individually addressed single-qubit rotations and detections, same- and mixed-species two-qubit gates, and real-time conditional operations, thereby demonstrating essential tools for scaling trapped-ion quantum computers combined in a single device.

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May 31, 2019

Quantum error correction and universal gate set operation on a binomial bosonic logical qubit

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Repeated error correction creates a logical qubit encoded in the hybrid state of a superconducting circuit and a bosonic cavity, which is shown to be fully controllable under a universal single-qubit gate set.

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May 31, 2019

Basics: — contents

Posted by in category: futurism

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May 31, 2019

How to store data error-free for millions of years

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing

Circa 2015


ETH researchers have found an error-free way to store information in the form of DNA, potentially preserving it for millions of years: encapsulate the information-bearing segments of DNA in silica (glass), using an error-correcting information-encoding scheme.

Scrolls thousands of years old provide us with a glimpse into long-forgotten cultures and the knowledge of our ancestors. In this digital era, in contrast, a large part of our knowledge is located on servers and hard drives, which may not survive 50 years, let alone thousands of years. So researchers are searching for new ways to store large volumes of data over the long term.

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May 31, 2019

The Mind-Boggling Challenge of Designing 120-Sided Dice

Posted by in category: futurism

A 120-sided dice is not an original idea, says mathematician Henry Segerman. “We were just the people crazy enough to actually do it.”

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