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Mar 19, 2020

Stretchable supercapacitors to power tomorrow’s wearable devices

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, wearables

Researchers at Duke University and Michigan State University have engineered a novel type of supercapacitor that remains fully functional even when stretched to eight times its original size. It does not exhibit any wear and tear from being stretched repeatedly and loses only a few percentage points of energy performance after 10,000 cycles of charging and discharging.

The researchers envision the being part of a power-independent, stretchable, flexible electronic system for applications such as wearable electronics or .

The results appear online March 19 in Matter, a journal from Cell Press. The research team includes senior author Changyong Cao, assistant professor of packaging, and electrical and computer engineering at Michigan State University (MSU), and senior author Jeff Glass, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Duke. Their co-authors are doctoral students Yihao Zhou and Qiwei Han and research scientist Charles Parker from Duke, as well as Ph.D. student Yunteng Cao from the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology.

Mar 19, 2020

In the coronavirus pandemic, we’re making decisions without reliable data

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Countermeasures like social distancing may help stop the spread of Covid-19. But how can policymakers tell if they are doing more good than harm? Data!

Mar 19, 2020

Posthuman Organisation

Posted by in category: futurism

New logo and new FB page for videos/ streaming events.


Hi, have set up this page for streamed or posted videos to support FB groups.

Mar 19, 2020

US military sets laser PHASRs to stun

Posted by in category: military

Circa 2005


The “non-lethal” laser rifle aims to dazzle suspects without causing permanent harm, but it will need to comply with a UN protocol on laser weaponry.

Mar 19, 2020

Artificial solid fog material creates pleasant laser light

Posted by in categories: computing, nanotechnology, space, transportation

With a porosity of 99.99 %, it consists practically only of air, making it one of the lightest materials in the world: Aerobornitride is the name of the material developed by an international research team led by Kiel University. The scientists assume that they have thereby created a central basis for bringing laser light into a broad application range. Based on a boron-nitrogen compound, they developed a special three-dimensional nanostructure that scatters light very strongly and hardly absorbs it. Irradiated with a laser, the material emits uniform lighting, which, depending on the type of laser, is much more efficient and powerful than LED light. Thus, lamps for car headlights, projectors or room lighting with laser light could become smaller and brighter in the future. The research team presents their results in the current issue of the renowned journal Nature Communications, which was published today.

More light in the smallest space

In research and industry, has long been considered the “next generation” of light sources that could even exceed the efficiency of LEDs (light-emitting diode). “For very bright or a lot of light, you need a large number of LEDs and thus space. But the same amount of light could also be obtained with a single diode that is one-thousandth smaller,” Dr. Fabian Schütt emphasizes the potential. The materials scientist from the working group “Functional Nanomaterials” at Kiel University is the first author of the study, which involves other researchers from Germany, England, Italy, Denmark and South Korea.

Mar 19, 2020

‘Uncharted waters:’ Kentucky gas station 1st in the nation to sell at 99 cents/gallon

Posted by in category: futurism

LONDON, Ky. — A gas station in London, Kentucky on Thursday, March 19 became the first in the nation to sell a gallon of gas for 99 cents.

GasBuddy officials confirmed via a cashier and GasBuddy users the BP gas station lowered its price to 99 cents per gallon as of about 6:30 a.m. Thursday.

GasBuddy had been anticipating this price could pop up in the Great Lakes states a week or so prior.

Mar 19, 2020

European consortium to develop compact ultraprecise optical clocks using superradiant lasers

Posted by in category: futurism

Partners in industry and academia are funded for the next three years for a total of 10 million Euros.

John Wallace

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Mar 19, 2020

Zapping our brains with magnets could help reverse memory loss

Posted by in categories: life extension, neuroscience

Circa 2019


Memory loss is usually seen as an inevitable part of ageing. But new research suggests that magnetic pulse stimulation can help older brains recover a little of their youthful vitality.

Mar 19, 2020

Some People Can Detect Earth’s Magnetic Field, Which Sounds Like a Pretty Sweet Party Trick

Posted by in category: futurism

Could some humans be able to sense the Earth’s magnetic field? Evidence suggests that in addition to quite a few animal species, humans could be—yes, this is the real term—magnetoreceptors. In a recent study, scientists conducted an experiment that measured how alpha waves interacted with a trace mineral that they believe registers magnetism.

Once upon a time, scientists thought animal magnetoreception was impossible, too. As they started to understand that birds and other animals used magnetoreception to navigate in the world, they still thought there was no way humans could do it.

Mar 19, 2020

Scientists create quantum sensor that covers entire radio frequency spectrum

Posted by in categories: military, particle physics, quantum physics

A quantum sensor could give Soldiers a way to detect communication signals over the entire radio frequency spectrum, from 0 to 100 GHz, said researchers from the Army.

Such wide spectral coverage by a single antenna is impossible with a traditional receiver system, and would require multiple systems of individual antennas, amplifiers and other components.

In 2018, Army scientists were the first in the world to create a quantum receiver that uses highly excited, super-sensitive atoms—known as Rydberg atoms—to detect communications signals, said David Meyer, a scientist at the U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command’s Army Research Laboratory. The researchers calculated the receiver’s channel capacity, or rate of data transmission, based on , and then achieved that performance experimentally in their lab—improving on other groups’ results by orders of magnitude, Meyer said.