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Oct 5, 2020

Futurist Neologisms You Should Know As We Enter the Cybernetic Era

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, robotics/AI, transhumanism

Terms such as ‘Artificial Intelligence’ or ‘Neurotechnology’ were new some time not so long ago. We can’t evolve faster than our language does. We think in concepts and evolution itself is a linguistic, code-theoretic process. Do yourself a humongous favor, look over these 33 transhumanist neologisms. Here’s a fairly comprehensive glossary of thirty three newly-introduced concepts and terms from The Syntellect Hypothesis: Five Paradigms of the Mind’s Evolution by Russian-Amer… See More.

Oct 5, 2020

Researchers find ‘Queen of the Ocean’ ancient great white shark off Nova Scotia coast

Posted by in category: futurism

The shark, named Nukumi by researchers, is more than 17 feet long, 3,541 pounds and believed to be about 50-years-old.


Researchers off the coast of Nova Scotia found a nearly 2-ton great white shark believed to be roughly 50 years old, dubbing her a true “Queen of the Ocean.”

Coming in at more than 17 feet long and 3,541 pounds, she is the largest shark the group has been able to sample in the Northwest Atlantic, according to a Friday Facebook post by OCEARCH, a non-profit marine research organization. She’s been named Nukumi for “the legendary wise old grandmother figure” of the Indigenous Mi’kmaq people, a First Nations group native to that region of Canada.

Continue reading “Researchers find ‘Queen of the Ocean’ ancient great white shark off Nova Scotia coast” »

Oct 5, 2020

Tesla Model 3 crushes Dodge Charger in 1-year review of cost of operation as police car

Posted by in categories: sustainability, transportation

Tesla Model 3 is crushing Dodge Charger as a police car when it comes to the cost of ownership as the Bargersville Police Chief who pushed to electrify his fleet shares a 1-year review of the cost of operation.

Last year, we reported on the Bargersville, Indiana, police department updating their fleet with Tesla Model 3 vehicles.

Bargersville Police Chief Todd Bertram commented at the time:

Oct 5, 2020

How the Brain Helps Us Navigate Social Differences

Posted by in category: neuroscience

When we talk to someone from a different socioeconomic background, our brain reacts differently than when we address someone with a similar status to our own. Researchers found higher activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with language and attentional control when people speak with those of different socioeconomic status. different socioeconomic background, our brain reacts differently than when we address someone with a similar status to our own. Researchers found higher activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with language and attentional control when people speak with those of different socioeconomic status. different socioeconomic background our brain reacts differently than when we address someone with a similar status to our own. Researchers found higher activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, an area of the brain associated with language and attentional control when people speak with those of different socioeconomic status.

Oct 5, 2020

Russian surfers say mystery ocean pollution is poisoning them and killing animals

Posted by in category: futurism

Images on social media show masses of sea life washed up on the beaches of Kamchatka, and water tests found high levels of oil products and other compounds.

Oct 5, 2020

Can AI Detect Disinformation? A New Special Operations Program May Find Out

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Air Force, U.S. Special Operations Command fund year-long effort to train a neural net to rank credibility and sort news from misinformation.

Oct 5, 2020

Neuroscientists discover a molecular mechanism that allows memories to form

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

When the brain forms a memory of a new experience, neurons called engram cells encode the details of the memory and are later reactivated whenever we recall it. A new MIT study reveals that this process is controlled by large-scale remodeling of cells’ chromatin.

This remodeling, which allows involved in storing memories to become more active, takes place in multiple stages spread out over several days. Changes to the density and arrangement of chromatin, a highly compressed structure consisting of DNA and proteins called histones, can control how active specific genes are within a given cell.

“This paper is the first to really reveal this very mysterious process of how different waves of genes become activated, and what is the epigenetic mechanism underlying these different waves of gene expression,” says Li-Huei Tsai, the director of MIT’s Picower Institute for Learning and Memory and the senior author of the study.

Oct 5, 2020

Press ‘delete’ to ditch a memory

Posted by in category: neuroscience

O,.o.


Ever wanted to get rid of a memory that holds you back or torments you? Well, you might soon be able to.

In an experiment out of the films Total Recall and Eternal Sunshine Of The Spotless Mind, painful experiences have been erased from the brain.

Continue reading “Press ‘delete’ to ditch a memory” »

Oct 5, 2020

Infrared Snake Eyes: TRPA1 and the Thermal Sensitivity of the Snake Pit Organ

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Circa 2010


The pit organs of pit vipers, pythons, and boas are remarkable sensory devices that allow these snakes to detect infrared radiation emitted by warm-blooded prey. It has been theorized that this capacity reflects the pit organ’s exceptional sensitivity to subtle fluctuations in temperature, but the molecules responsible for this extreme thermal resolution have been unknown. New evidence shows that pit organs respond to temperature using the warmth-activated cation channel TRPA1 (transient receptor potential ankyrin 1), a finding that provides a first glimpse of the underlying molecular hardware. The properties of these snake TRPA1s raise intriguing questions about the mechanisms responsible for the exceptional sensitivity of many biological thermoreceptors and about the evolutionary origins of these warmth-activated TRP channels.

Oct 5, 2020

Inflight fiber printing toward array and 3D optoelectronic and sensing architectures

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, chemistry, nanotechnology, wearables

Scalability and device integration have been prevailing issues limiting our ability in harnessing the potential of small-diameter conducting fibers. We report inflight fiber printing (iFP), a one-step process that integrates conducting fiber production and fiber-to-circuit connection. Inorganic (silver) or organic {PEDOT: PSS [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate]} fibers with 1- to 3-μm diameters are fabricated, with the fiber arrays exhibiting more than 95% transmittance (350 to 750 nm). The high surface area–to–volume ratio, permissiveness, and transparency of the fiber arrays were exploited to construct sensing and optoelectronic architectures. We show the PEDOT: PSS fibers as a cell-interfaced impedimetric sensor, a three-dimensional (3D) moisture flow sensor, and noncontact, wearable/portable respiratory sensors. The capability to design suspended fibers, networks of homo cross-junctions and hetero cross-junctions, and coupling iFP fibers with 3D-printed parts paves the way to additive manufacturing of fiber-based 3D devices with multilatitude functions and superior spatiotemporal resolution, beyond conventional film-based device architectures.

Small-diameter conducting fibers have unique morphological, mechanical, and optical properties such as high aspect ratio, low bending stiffness, directionality, and transparency that set them apart from other classes of conducting, film-based micro/nano structures (1–3). Orderly assembling of thin conducting fibers into an array or three-dimensional (3D) structures upscales their functional performance for device coupling. Developing new strategies to control rapid synthesis, patterning, and integration of these conducting elements into a device architecture could mark an important step in enabling new device functions and electronic designs (4, 5). To date, conducting micro/nanoscaled fibers have been produced and assembled in a number of ways, from transferring of chemically grown nanofibers/wires (6, 7), writing electrohydrodynamically deposited lines (8, 9), to drawing ultralong fibers (10, 11), wet spinning of fibers (12–14), and 2D/3D direct printing (15–18).