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Oct 27, 2015

World’s first sonic tractor beam lifts objects using sound waves

Posted by in category: tractor beam

Researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Sussex, in collaboration with Ultrahaptics, have built the world’s first sonic tractor beam that can lift and move objects using sound waves.

Details of the device, published in Nature Communications, describe how the tractor beam uses high-amplitude sound waves to generate an acoustic hologram that is capable of picking up and moving small objects. The technique comes straight from the pages of a science-fiction novel.

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Oct 27, 2015

Chewbacca arrested, Emperor Palpatine wins in bizarre Ukrainian elections

Posted by in categories: internet, transhumanism

A funny article ending with transhumanism:


Ukraine’s Internet Party, which has been adding levity and subtle satire to the country’s tense politics for a few years now, is making a statement with sci-fi again. Yes, this is all true.

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Oct 27, 2015

Acer is launching an electric all-terrain vehicle

Posted by in categories: electronics, mobile phones, transportation

Acer might be better-known for its range of laptops, tablets, phones, and similar consumer electronics, but it has quietly lifted the lid on a brand-new product line — an electric, all-terrain vehicle (eATV).

The Taiwanese tech titan unveiled the eATV “X Terran” (presumably that’s not meant to be ‘Terrain’) prototype at the eCarTech conference in Munich last week, but the company didn’t reveal too many details. We have, however, now obtained some photos of the vehicle.

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Oct 27, 2015

See how InVisage’s HDR sensor will improve smartphone filmmaking

Posted by in categories: media & arts, mobile phones, transportation

https://youtube.com/watch?v=GbShbMRudUM

InVisage filmed in challenging, bright sunlight conditions to test the dynamic range, and shot fast moving subjects (RC race cars) to show off the global shutter. The resulting footage (below) is surprisingly cinematic, considering that the sensor is smartphone sized. (It’s also a bit soft, which the company chalked up to the sensor being an early prototype.) The tech looks intriguing, though the level of hype in the press release and making-of film is a bit over-the-top. Still, if it can be refined further — perhaps by a sensor company like Sony — it could result in strikingly better smartphone and camera images in the not-too-distant future.

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Oct 27, 2015

This robot can precisely copy your movements

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

This robot can precisely copy your movements, but more impressively, it can solve a Rubik Cube all by itself. http://voc.tv/1cRrjAQ

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Oct 27, 2015

Why robots shouldn’t be allowed to drink

Posted by in categories: futurism, robotics/AI

They cannot stop us. They cannot stop the future. At the recent DARPA Robotics Challenge, things didn’t always go as planned…

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Oct 26, 2015

Kenny Rogers Photo

Posted by in category: futurism

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Oct 26, 2015

Our verdict on the Surface Book in under a minute. Full review…

Posted by in category: computing

Microsoft’s Surface Book in under a minute.

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Oct 26, 2015

Digital-savvy, eco-conscious drivers targeted at Tokyo Motor Show

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, space, transportation

Toyota’s three-seater exoskeleton car and an electric vehicle with touch screens that turn it into a “digital space” are among the concept models that will be on display at the Tokyo Motor Show this week.

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Oct 26, 2015

Physicists uncover novel phase of matter

Posted by in categories: materials, physics

A team of physicists led by Caltech’s David Hsieh has discovered an unusual form of matter—not a conventional metal, insulator, or magnet, for example, but something entirely different. This phase, characterized by an unusual ordering of electrons, offers possibilities for new electronic device functionalities and could hold the solution to a long-standing mystery in condensed matter physics having to do with high-temperature superconductivity—the ability for some materials to conduct electricity without resistance, even at “high” temperatures approaching −100 degrees Celsius.

“The discovery of this was completely unexpected and not based on any prior theoretical prediction,” says Hsieh, an assistant professor of physics, who previously was on a team that discovered another form of matter called a topological insulator. “The whole field of electronic materials is driven by the discovery of new phases, which provide the playgrounds in which to search for new macroscopic physical properties.”

Hsieh and his colleagues describe their findings in the November issue of Nature Physics, and the paper is now available online. Liuyan Zhao, a postdoctoral scholar in Hsieh’s group, is lead author on the paper.

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