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Oct 29, 2015

Quantum communications go thin and light

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics

Trong Toan Tran states: “Ultimately we want to build a ‘plug and play’ device that can generate single photons on demand…” #QuantumComputing.


A team of UTS researchers has made a major breakthrough that could pave the way for the next generation of quantum communications.

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Oct 29, 2015

Is black phosphorous the next big thing in materials?

Posted by in categories: engineering, materials

Can black phosphorous rival #graphene?


A new experimental revelation about black phosphorus nanoribbons should facilitate the future application of this highly promising material to electronic, optoelectronic and thermoelectric devices. A team of researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has experimentally confirmed strong in-plane anisotropy in thermal conductivity, up to a factor of two, along the zigzag and armchair directions of single-crystal black phosphorous nanoribbons.

“Imagine the lattice of black phosphorous as a two-dimensional network of balls connected with springs, in which the network is softer along one direction of the plane than another,” says Junqiao Wu, a physicist who holds joint appointments with Berkeley Lab’s Materials Sciences Division and the University of California (UC) Berkeley’s Department of Materials Science and Engineering. “Our study shows that in a similar manner heat flow in the black phosphorous nanoribbons can be very different along different directions in the plane. This thermal conductivity has been predicted recently for 2D black phosphorous crystals by theorists but never before observed.”

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Oct 29, 2015

Nissan Speeds Ahead of Rivals With Plans for Driverless Car

Posted by in categories: law, robotics/AI, transportation

Nissan says its autonomous car will be ready for sale to consumers by 2020.


Nissan Motor Co. is aggressively pushing forward with plans for a mostly autonomous car that will be ready for sale to consumers by 2020, putting it well ahead of its global competitors.

Chief Executive Carlos Ghosn said the technology would be ready by the Japanese auto maker’s self-imposed deadline—though he wasn’t sure if it would be legal on any nation’s roads.

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Oct 29, 2015

Powerless refrigerator keeps food cold through evaporation

Posted by in categories: food, innovation

Students from Calgary win first prize at the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge, for their invention of a electricity-free cooling unit.

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Oct 29, 2015

This Building Doesn’t Need A/C: The Building Itself Is An Air Conditioner — By Ben Schiller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, business, energy

“This ingenious cooling system circulates cooled air in an endless loop—all without any electricity.”

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Oct 29, 2015

The iPhone 6S screen is so sensitive it can ‘weigh’ objects

Posted by in category: mobile phones

Someone created an app that can tell which objects are heavier using 3D Touch.

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Oct 29, 2015

Seagate ships 8TB drive for video

Posted by in category: electronics

Seagate has announced the availability of an 8TB hard disk drive designed for recording up to 64 video streams simultaneously while running 24/7.

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Oct 29, 2015

Speeding up the work of measurements

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

News to streamline the work measurements. smile

Free for iOS and Android here: http://goo.gl/mnNbZh

Follow the engineering is:

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Oct 29, 2015

Wifi Networks Can Now Identify Who You Are Through Walls

Posted by in categories: computing, internet, robotics/AI

Who needs a peep hole when a wifi network will do? Researchers from MIT have developed technology that uses wireless signals to see your silhouette through a wall—and it can even tell you apart from other people, too.

The team from MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Lab are no strangers to using wireless signals to see what’s happening on the other side of a wall. In 2013, they showed off software that could use variations in wifi signal to detect the presence of human motion from the other side of a wall. But in the last two years they’ve been busy developing the technique, and now they’ve unveiled the obvious — if slightly alarming — natural progression: they can use the wireless reflections bouncing off a human body to see the silhouette of a person standing behind a wall.

Not only that, the team’s technique, known is RF-Capture, is accurate enough to track the hand of a human and, with some repeated measurements, the system can even be trained to recognise different people based just on their wifi silhouette. The research, which is to be presented at SIGGRAPH Asia next month, was published this morning on the research group’s website.

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Oct 29, 2015

Warp Factor 11 — ships powered by BLACK HOLES to “outpace Enterprise”, say scientists

Posted by in categories: cosmology, energy, food, space travel

The novel its a bit older, but it‘s an incredible vision!


When Star Trek’s Scotty warns the Captain that the engines can’t “take it”, he might just be best off switching fuel — a new book claims that humanity could reach the stars using vast spacecraft harnessing the energy of black holes with the power to “eat planets”.

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