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Archive for the ‘law’ category

Mar 22, 2017

A Bizarre Physics Law Is Making Superfluid Helium Behave Like an Actual Black Hole

Posted by in categories: cosmology, law, quantum physics

Of all the laws of physics, this is arguably one of the strangest — scientists have discovered that the forces controlling the behaviour of a black hole’s event horizon are also at play in superfluid helium, an extraordinary liquid that flows without friction.

This entanglement area law has now been observed at both the vast scale of black holes and the atomic scale of cold helium, and could be the key to finally establishing the long sought-after quantum theory of gravity — the solution to one of the deepest problems in theoretical physics today.

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Mar 21, 2017

Law Controlling Bizarre Behavior of Black Holes –“Points to a Deeper Understanding of Realty”

Posted by in categories: cosmology, law, particle physics

A team of scientists has discovered that a law controlling the bizarre behavior of black holes out in space—is also true for cold helium atoms that can be studied in laboratories. “It’s called an entanglement area law,” says Adrian Del Maestro, a physicist at the University of Vermont who co-led the research. That this law appears at both the vast scale of outer space and at the tiny scale of atoms, “is weird,” Del Maestro says, “and it points to a deeper understanding of reality.”

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Mar 18, 2017

You Can Ban a Person, But What About Their Hologram?

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, holograms, law, media & arts

If you think augmented reality is only fun and games, consider that we’ve already witnessed the first known police action taken against hologram technology. During the summer of 2015, a performance by controversial gangster-rapper, Keith Cozart, was shut down when local police discovered the musician was broadcast as a hologram into a benefit concert in Indiana—close to the border of his home state of Illinois.

Cozart, who goes by the stage name “Chief Keef,” is from a rough neighborhood in Chicago, and has ties to local gangs as well as a criminal record including felony gun charges. His music, which glamorizes a gang lifestyle and violence, has prompted public officials—including Chicago mayor Rahm Emanuel—to pressure music festivals to avoid inviting Cozart because they say it poses a “significant public safety risk.”

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Mar 17, 2017

How Artificial Intelligence and the robotic revolution will change the workplace of tomorrow

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, education, employment, finance, habitats, law, robotics/AI

The workplace is going to look drastically different ten years from now. The coming of the Second Machine Age is quickly bringing massive changes along with it. Manual jobs, such as lorry driving or house building are being replaced by robotic automation, and accountants, lawyers, doctors and financial advisers are being supplemented and replaced by high level artificial intelligence (AI) systems.

So what do we need to learn today about the jobs of tomorrow? Two things are clear. The robots and computers of the future will be based on a degree of complexity that will be impossible to teach to the general population in a few short years of compulsory education. And some of the most important skills people will need to work with robots will not be the things they learn in computing class.

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Mar 15, 2017

New nano-implant could one day help restore sight

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, law, nanotechnology, neuroscience

A team of engineers at the University of California San Diego and La Jolla-based startup Nanovision Biosciences Inc. have developed the nanotechnology and wireless electronics for a new type of retinal prosthesis that brings research a step closer to restoring the ability of neurons in the retina to respond to light. The researchers demonstrated this response to light in a rat retina interfacing with a prototype of the device in vitro.

They detail their work in a recent issue of the Journal of Neural Engineering. The technology could help tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from neurodegenerative diseases that affect eyesight, including macular degeneration, retinitis pigmentosa and loss of vision due to diabetes.

Despite tremendous advances in the development of over the past two decades, the performance of devices currently on the market to help the blind regain functional vision is still severely limited—well under the acuity threshold of 20/200 that defines legal blindness.

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Mar 9, 2017

Life and death: When the end arrives, should we upgrade or shut down?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cryonics, geopolitics, law, life extension, transhumanism

Transhumanism appearing in the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s (AAAS) magazine: Science…


Modern technology and modern medical practice have evolved over the past decades, enabling us to enhance and extend human life to an unprecedented degree. The two books under review examine this phenomenon from remarkably different perspectives.

Mark O’Connell’s To Be a Machine is an examination of transhumanism, a movement characterized by technologies that seek to transform the human condition and extend life spans indefinitely. O’Connell, a journalist, makes his own prejudices clear: “I am not now, nor have I ever been, a transhumanist,” he writes. However, this does not stop him from thoughtfully surveying the movement.

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Feb 28, 2017

JPMorgan Software Does in Seconds What Took Lawyers 360,000 Hours

Posted by in categories: finance, law

Na JPMorgan Chase & Co., uma máquina de aprendizagem está analisando os acordos financeiros que antes mantinham equipes jurídicas ocupadas por milhares de horas.

O programa, chamado COIN, para o Contrato de Inteligência, faz a tarefa de interpretar acordos de empréstimo comercial que, até que o projeto foi lançado em junho, consumiu 360 mil horas de trabalho por ano por advogados e agentes de crédito. O software revê os documentos em segundos, é menos propenso a erros e nunca pede férias.

No que diz respeito à COIN, o programa ajudou a JPMorgan a reduzir os erros de manutenção de empréstimos, a maioria resultante de erro humano na interpretação de 12.000 novos contratos por ano, de acordo com os seus criadores.

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Feb 25, 2017

India can become a leading scientific power in the world

Posted by in category: law

He also said there are a lot of opportunities for India but it is China which is seizing them. “India must rise to the role it should be playing for its benefit, for the benefit of science and rest of the world,” he added. India and China have been growing rapidly in the last few decades and both have doubled their GDP. But China, he said, in this period doubled its investment in science and technology while India’s funding reminded at the same level. South Korea, a much smaller country, is also investing a lot in science and the results are showing, he said.


Funding delays and legal challenges preventing the country from achieving greatness, says Nobel Laureate David Gross.

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Feb 24, 2017

The Long-Shot Bid to Put Crispr in the Hands of the People

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics, government, law

Last week, the US Patent and Trademarks Office ruled on the most-watched patent proceeding of the 21st century: the fight for Crispr-Cas9. The decision was supposed to declare ownership of the rights to the revolutionary gene editing technique. But instead, the patent judge granted sorta-victories to each of the rival parties—a team from UC Berkeley and another with members from both MIT and Harvard University’s Broad Institute. That’s great for those groups (and their spin-off, for-profit gene editing companies with exclusive licenses). But it leaves things a bit murkier for anyone else who wants to turn a buck with gene editing.

The Crispr discoverers now have some authority over who gets to use Crispr, and for what. And while exclusive licenses aren’t rare in biotech, the scope of these do stand out: They cover all the 20,000-plus genes in the human genome. So this week, legal experts are sending a formal request to the Department of Health and Human Services. They want the federal government to step in and bring Crispr back to the people.

Crispr is new, but patent laws governing genetic engineering date back decades. In 1980, shortly after the Supreme Court ruled that genetically engineered microbes were patentable, Congress passed something called the Bayh-Doyle Act. The law gives permission for universities to patent—and license—anything their researchers invented with public funds, making it easier to put those inventions back in the hands of citizens.

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Feb 22, 2017

Zoltan Istvan on transhumanism, politics and why the human body has to go

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, genetics, geopolitics, law, neuroscience, transhumanism

A new and extensive interview I did at New Atlas, including ideas about my #libertarian California Governor run. Libertarianism has many good ideas, but two core concepts are the non-aggression principle (NAP) and protection of private property rights—both of which I believe can be philosophically applied to the human body (and the body’s inevitable transhuman destiny of overcoming disease and decay with science and technology):


Zoltan Istvan is a transhumanist, journalist, politician, writer and libertarian. He is also running for Governor of California for the Libertarian Party on a platform pushing science and technology to the forefront of political discourse. In recent years, the movement of transhumanism has moved from a niche collection of philosophical ideals and anarcho-punk gestures into a mainstream political movement. Istvan has become the popular face of this movement after running for president in 2016 on a dedicated transhumanist platform.

We caught up with Istvan to chat about how transhumanist ideals can translate into politics, how technology is going to change us as humans and the dangers in not keeping up with new innovations, such as genetic editing.

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