Archive for the ‘cybercrime/malcode’ category

Oct 25, 2016

Russian military build impenetrable closed internet – and mocks US technology

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, internet, military

For my CISO/ CSO friends.

It is believed that Russia has the Internet that is considered as impenetrable. Such technology protects Russia from hacking attempts.

The World Wide Web (WWW) is prone to hacking, as shown in the recent cyber attacks on the US which led to outages on giants including Twitter, Amazon and Spotify, for which Russia has been largely blamed, so the Eastern European powerhouse has upped its security measures.

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Oct 24, 2016

Chinese firm admits its hacked products were behind Friday’s massive DDOS attack

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, internet

A Chinese electronics component manufacturer says its products inadvertently played a role in a massive cyberattack that disrupted major internet sites in the U.S. on Friday.

Hangzhou Xiongmai Technology, a vendor behind DVRs and internet-connected cameras, said on Sunday that security vulnerabilities involving weak default passwords in its products were partly to blame.

According to security researchers, malware known as Mirai has been taking advantage of these vulnerabilities by infecting the devices and using them to launch huge distributed denial-of service attacks, including Friday’s outage.

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Oct 15, 2016

Teen claims he makes $5K a WEEK illegally buying credit card details

Posted by in category: cybercrime/malcode

No job, no money techie = no problem because you have the Dark Web.

‘New Zealand Wolf of Wall Street’, 19, makes $5000 a week by using credit card details he fraudulently acquires online. With the stolen money, he lives a life normally reserved for Hollywood movies. (stock)

Oct 13, 2016

DARPA investigating blockchain for nuclear weapons, satellite security

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cybercrime/malcode, military

If the Defense Department is looking to implement blockchain, other organizations may quickly follow suit. Blockchain technology helps guarantee that information has a timestamp and recorded whenever any change happens, ensuring data can be trusted in real time. In DARPA’s case, blockchain technology could help track attempted data breaches.

“Whenever weapons are employed … it tends to be a place where data integrity in general is incredibly important,” Booher said. “So nuclear command and control, satellite command and control, command and control in general, [information integrity] is very important.”

In September, DARPA awarded a $1.8 million contract to computer security firm Galois, asking it to verify a specific type of blockchain technology from a company called Guardtime. If the verification goes well, the military could become one of a growing number of industries and institutions using blockchain to help ensure the security of their operations.

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Oct 13, 2016

Will Quantum Computers Kill Bitcoin?

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, cybercrime/malcode, encryption, quantum physics

Since they were first theorized by the physicist Richard Feynman in 1982, quantum computers have promised to bring about a new era of computing. It is only relatively recently that theory has translated into significant real-world advances, with the likes of Google, NASA and the CIA working towards building a quantum computer. Computer scientists are now warning that the arrival of the ultra-powerful machines will cripple current encryption methods and as a result bring a close to the great bitcoin experiment—collapsing the technological foundations that bitcoin is built upon.

“Bitcoin is definitely not quantum computer proof,” Andersen Cheng, co-founder of U.K. cybersecurity firm Post Quantum, tells Newsweek. “Bitcoin will expire the very day the first quantum computer appears.”

The danger quantum computers pose to bitcoin, Cheng explains, is in the cryptography surrounding what is known as the public and private keys—a set of numbers used to facilitate transactions. Users of bitcoin have a public key and a private key. In order to receive bitcoin, the recipient shares the public key with the sender, but in order to spend it they need their private key, which only they know. If somebody else is able to learn the private key, they can spend all the bitcoin.

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Oct 11, 2016

Quantum Computing Could Cripple Encryption; Bitcoin’s Role

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, cybercrime/malcode, encryption, government, quantum physics

Earlier this week, Canada’s electronic spy agency the Communications Security Establishment warned government agencies and businesses against quantum mechanics, which could cripple the majority of encryption methods implemented by leading corporations and agencies globally.

Governments and private companies employ a variety of cryptographic security systems and protocols to protect and store important data. Amongst these encryption methods, the most popular system is public key cryptography (PKC), which can be integrated onto a wide range of software, platforms, and applications to encrypt data.

The Communications Security Establishment and its chief Greta Bossenmaier believes that quantum computing is technically capable of targeting PKC-based encryption methods, making data vulnerable to security breaches and hacking attempts from foreign state spies and anonymous hacking groups.

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Oct 10, 2016

Commission plans cybersecurity rules for internet-connected machines

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, food, internet, law, policy, transportation

The European Commission is getting ready to propose new legislation to protect machines from cybersecurity breaches, signalling the executive’s growing interest in encouraging traditional European manufacturers to build more devices that are connected to the internet.

A new plan to overhaul EU telecoms law, which digital policy chiefs Günther Oettinger and Andrus Ansip presented three weeks ago, aims to speed up internet connections to meet the needs of big industries like car manufacturing and agriculture as they gradually use more internet functions.

But that transition to more and faster internet connections has caused many companies to worry that new products and industrial tools that rely on the internet will be more vulnerable to attacks from hackers.

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Oct 8, 2016

Artificial intelligence-powered malware is coming, and it’s going to be terrifying

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, robotics/AI

Smart viruses holding hospital equipment to ransom. Malware that impersonates people you know. Data-altering software that can destroy corporations. Get ready.

Oct 5, 2016

DARPA chief Arati Prabhakar on self-driving ships, space travel, IoT, genetics, and more

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, genetics, internet, robotics/AI, space travel

The Internet of Things so widely predicted as the Next Big Thing in computing is full of promise but presents a correspondingly large vulnerability to cyber attacks, said Arati Prabhakar, director of DARPA, at the 2016 GeekWire Summit in Seattle today.

IoT offers “a huge value, but then with every advance comes more attack surface,” said Prabhakar during an interview with Alan Boyle, GeekWire’s aerospace and science editor. “Provably secure embedded systems is part of the answer.”

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Oct 5, 2016

How Quantum Computing Could Change Cybersecurity Forever [Video]

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, government, quantum physics

As I have continued for over a year to repeat that for any company or government entity to not include QC in their 5+ yrs future state roadmap is truly enabling their company or government to be easy pickings for hackers.

Quantum scientist Michele Mosca will discuss security in the coming quantum age during a live Webcast tonight at 7 P.M.

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