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Jul 19, 2015

Entrepreneurs, Not Government, Drive Innovation — Peter Diamandis Linkedin

Posted by in categories: business, Peter Diamandis

Entrepreneurs, Not Government, Drive Innovation – Here’s Why

It’s sad that the U.S. government doesn’t fund risky research anymore.

After all, “the day before something is truly a breakthrough, it’s a crazy idea”… and if you’re not funding crazy ideas, you’re stuck with linear (incremental) thinking.

This blog is about why YOU as an entrepreneur (or ‘exponential CEO’) are going to be solving our problems, as opposed to waiting for the government. Read more

Jul 17, 2015

The innovative power of slack time | Business Standard

Posted by in categories: business, innovation

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There is a whole lot more to than thinking up a great new idea. A new study from the University of Toronto’s suggests that when budding entrepreneurs get time off their normal activities to work on other things — dubbed ‘slack’ time — they use it to complete the less exciting jobs needed to bring a novel project to life.

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Jul 16, 2015

What Competing In An Ironman Taught Me About Entrepreneurship — By Brandon Weber | Fast Company

Posted by in category: business

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Between starting a real estate technology company, Hightower, and completing in an Ironman, I’ve had my fair share of feeling in over my head. However, each of these adventures has taught me how to overcome an overwhelming challenge. Here are four humble pieces of advice for all of you crazy enough to do the same.

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Jul 7, 2015

Passfaces: Strong authentication for the masses

Posted by in categories: big data, business, computing, encryption, finance, information science, internet

Last year, Google began experimenting with hardware-based schemes for user-authentication, while Apple added two factor authentication to iCloud and Apple ID users. They began sending a verification code to users via a mobile number registered in advance.

Security pundits know that two factor authentication is more secure than simple passwords. As a refresher, “Factors” are typically described like this:

  • Something that you know (a password — or even better, a formula)
  • Something that you have (Secure ID token or code sent to cell phone)
  • Something that you are (a biometric: fingerprint, voice, face, etc.)

The Google project may be just another method of factor #2. In fact, because it is small (easily misplaced or stolen), it simplifies but does not improve on security. I suggest a radical and reliable method of authentication. It’s not new and it’s not my idea…

password_key

Continue reading “Passfaces: Strong authentication for the masses” »


Jun 29, 2015

What If Authors Were Paid Every Time Someone Turned a Page? — Peter Wayner | The Atlantic

Posted by in categories: business, entertainment

“The maker of the Kindle is going to flip the formula used for reimbursing some of the authors who depend on it for sales. Instead of paying these authors by the book, Amazon will soon start paying authors based on how many pages are read—not how many pages are downloaded, but how many pages are displayed on the screen long enough to be parsed.” Read More

Jun 23, 2015

Honda’s Gravity Modification Research

Posted by in categories: anti-gravity, business, cosmology, defense, disruptive technology, engineering, general relativity, gravity, innovation, particle physics, physics, quantum physics, science, space travel

Gravity modification, the scientific term for antigravity, is the ability to modify the gravitational field without the use of mass. Thus legacy physics, the RSQ (Relativity, String & Quantum) theories, cannot deliver either the physics or technology as these require mass as their field origin.

Ron Kita who recently received the first US patent (8901943) related to gravity modification, in recent history, introduced me to Dr. Takaaki Musha some years ago. Dr. Musha has a distinguished history researching Biefeld-Brown in Japan, going back to the late 1980s, and worked for the Ministry of Defense and Honda R&D.

Dr. Musha is currently editing New Frontiers in Space Propulsion (Nova Publishers) expected later this year. He is one of the founders of the International Society for Space Science whose aim is to develop new propulsion systems for interstellar travel.

Wait. What? Honda? Yes. For us Americans, it is unthinkable for General Motors to investigate gravity modification, and here was Honda in the 1990s, at that, researching this topic.

Continue reading “Honda's Gravity Modification Research” »


Jun 16, 2015

Elon Musk: The World’s Raddest Man By Tim Urban | Wait But Why

Posted by in categories: business, energy, engineering, solar power, space travel, sustainability, transportation

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Tim Urban, of Wait But Why, recently received a phone call from Elon Musk’s staff asking if he would like to write about the automotive, aerospace, and solar power industries through personal interviews with Elon Musk and his teams. Tim Urban said yes, and the first three of essays / articles are already posted on his site.

Elon Musk: The World’s Raddest Man

Jun 15, 2015

SpaceX just launched a Hyperloop pod-racing competition By Sean O’Kane | The Verge

Posted by in categories: business, sustainability, transportation

“SpaceX just announced an official contest open to university students and independent engineering teams. The company will release detailed rules, criteria, and tube specifications in August. … The challenge will be to build “human-scale pods” to be tested on the Hawthorne, California test track that will be built next to the SpaceX headquarters, but the company is careful to note that no humans will ride in the pods. All the designs submitted must be open source.”

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Jun 12, 2015

So, Uber Just Released Its Own Videogame — Davey Alba Wired

Posted by in categories: business, entertainment, fun, media & arts, transportation

Uber, the multibillion-dollar on-demand rides company, wouldn’t be able to execute its global grand plan without the million drivers who have offered rides on its platform. Over the past five years, the company has relied on myriad tactics to lure new drivers in and keep them happy: rallies, ads, word-of-mouth, even a quarterly magazine. Now it’s trying another strategy: a videogame.

The company today released UberDRIVE, an iOS game that essentially mimics what it’s like to drive for Uber. Players “pick up” passengers and drive them from point A to point B. The more efficient the route they choose, the more points they can rack up in the game. If players earn consistently high ratings, they can unlock new cars and explore new areas of the city. The game also includes fun facts on important landmarks in the city, as well as a “trivia mode” where riders quiz drivers (the player) on certain destinations on the map. At launch, the game only includes a virtual San Francisco, though it’s available to play nationwide. If the game is successful, Uber says it will add new cities to the app soon. Read more

Jun 8, 2015

NASA is investing in eco-friendly supersonic airplane travel — By Mike Murphy | Quartz

Posted by in categories: business, environmental, government, science, sustainability

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NASA said that if all goes to plan with these studies, it sees the first business-jet-sized supersonic planes going into production by 2025, and commercial planes by 2030.

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