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Archive for the ‘education’ category

May 29, 2015

New York State Governor Cuomo Announces Living Breakwaters Project Launch via bfi.org

Posted by in categories: architecture, economics, education, energy, engineering, environmental, governance, government, policy, water

“Living Breakwaters is a comprehensive design for coastal resiliency along the Northeastern Seaboard of the United States and beyond. This approach to climate change adaptation and flood mitigation includes the deployment of innovative, layered ecologically-engineered breakwaters, the strengthening of biodiversity and coastal habitats through “reef streets”, the nurturing and resuscitation of fisheries and historic livelihoods, and deep community engagement through diverse partnerships and innovative educational programs. The transformative educational dimension amplifies impact to the next generation of shoreline stewards while leveraging the expertise of the members of the SCAPE Architecture team, who are making groundbreaking inroads into state and federal agencies, setting new precedents for multi-layered and systemic approaches to infrastructure planning.”

LINK: Governor Cuomo Announces Living Breakwaters Project Launch

May 27, 2015

MIT’s President: Op-ed on Innovation

Posted by in categories: business, disruptive technology, economics, education, finance, government, innovation, policy, science, strategy

“[T]he United States needs a more systematic way to help its bottled-up new-science innovators deliver their ideas to the world.”

A better way to deliver innovation to the world

May 26, 2015

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Selects 2015 Investigators

Posted by in categories: biological, biotech/medical, computing, DNA, education, genetics, life extension, neuroscience, science, scientific freedom

“The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) announced today that 26 of the nation’s top biomedical researchers will become HHMI investigators and will receive the flexible support necessary to move their research in creative new directions. The initiative represents an investment in basic biomedical research of $153 million over the next five years.”

HHMI Selects 26 of the Nation’s Top Biomedical Scientists

May 21, 2015

NASA and The Planetary Society Launch the LightSail

Posted by in categories: astronomy, cosmology, education, energy, habitats, physics, science, solar power, space, space travel

The Planetary Society’s LightSail launched yesterday, May 20th, 2015.

May 20, 2015

World Economic Forum 2015 The Human Capital Report

Posted by in categories: big data, business, complex systems, defense, economics, education, governance, government, information science, innovation, law, policy

Human Capital Report 2015 WEF

May 4, 2015

Study provides foundation for the future of digital higher education

Posted by in category: education

Univ. of Texas | Phys.org


“The study supports previously published research that has found online learning to be equally or more effective than in-person instruction. The new study, however, delves further by examining the evolution of learning in digital spaces, including various approaches to credentialing and assessment beyond the traditional grading scale and diploma. Future technology structures that bear no resemblance to current learning management systems are described as part of the tool set for the 21st century education.”

Read more

Apr 16, 2015

Here’s How We Can Reinvent the Classroom for the Digital Age

Posted by in category: education

By — Singularity Hub

http://cdn.singularityhub.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/future-of-education-21-1000x400.jpg

When I was in elementary school, about 50 years ago, teachers used to stand in front of a class of 40 or 50 children and write on a blackboard with chalk. To make sure the material was absorbed, the teacher asked occasional questions and assigned lots of homework. If students discussed their homework or helped each other in tests, it was called cheating, and they were punished.

Today, the blackboard has become a whiteboard; chalk has become a magic marker; the slates that students used have been replaced by notebooks; and classes have sometimes gotten smaller. Little else has changed. True, some schools are providing their students with laptops, and teachers are increasingly using technology and encouraging collaboration. But the methods are essentially the same—with the teacher dictating learning. Read more

Apr 14, 2015

Galactic Public Archives Presents: “New Narratives: Innovation for Jobs” the series

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, economics, education, engineering, environmental, futurism, government, innovation, robotics/AI, sustainability

‘New Narratives: Innovation for Jobs’ is a series by i4j (Innovation for Jobs) and the GPA exploring perspectives on important topics that will impact the future of work, jobs and employment.

About i4j: (iiij.org/i4j) Innovation for Jobs conferences bring together individuals from the public and private sectors to discuss the changing economy. “We engage in initiatives creating structures for developing shared language across silos. The starting point for any innovation is the creation of shared language, enabling stakeholders and change agents to interact horizontally.”

This film was created at the Mountain View 2015 i4j Conference. What are your hopes and fears about the future of meaningful work?

Continue reading “Galactic Public Archives Presents: "New Narratives: Innovation for Jobs" the series” »


Mar 30, 2015

Transnationalism to Transhumanism: the Mont Order Club’s video discussion

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI, science, transhumanism, transparency

The Mont Order Club hosted its first video conference in February 2015, as shown below.

Suggested topics included transhumanism, antistatism, world events, movements, collaboration, and alternative media. The Mont Order is an affiliation of dissident writers and groups who share similar views on transnationalism and transhumanism as positive and inevitable developments.

Participants:

Continue reading “Transnationalism to Transhumanism: the Mont Order Club's video discussion” »


Mar 28, 2015

Out of the box thinking fostered at unique school founded by tech giants

Posted by in categories: education, singularity

The University of British Columbiahttp://news.ubc.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/SU770.jpg
One year ago, Tamara Etmannski became the first Canadian Global Impact Competition winner. The award earned her a scholarship to take part in a 10-week program at Silicon Valley’s Singularity University — a non-accredited institution that aims to solve the world’s greatest challenges through technology. The university was founded by tech legends Peter Diamandis, of the X PRIZE Foundation, and Ray Kurzweil, of Google.

Etmannski, now a UBC Faculty of Applied Science lecturer, is helping develop a new Masters of Engineering Leadership program, tied to the Sauder School of Business. As the second Canadian Global Impact Competition heats up — the winner will be announced April 2 — Etmannski explains how her experience at Singularity University transformed her thinking, and what engineering and business can teach each other.

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