Archive for the ‘education’ category

Nov 26, 2015

New study finds that teaching is not essential for people to learn to make effective tools

Posted by in categories: education, engineering, space

Well if we do have a major SHTF event even though we don’t have many skilled tool makers any more. Then at least the remains of society should be able to teach itself tool making.

A new study from the University of Exeter has found that teaching is not essential for people to learn to make effective tools. The results counter established views about how human tools and technologies come to improve from generation to generation and point to an explanation for the extraordinary success of humans as a species. The study reveals that although teaching is useful, it is not essential for cultural progress because people can use reasoning and reverse engineering of existing items to work out how to make tools.

The capacity to improve the efficacy of tools and technologies from generation to generation, known as cumulative culture, is unique to humans and has driven our ecological success. It has enabled us to inhabit the coldest and most remote regions on Earth and even have a permanent base in space. The way in which our cumulative culture has boomed compared to other species however remains a mystery.

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Nov 22, 2015

Deus Ex: The Eyeborg Documentary

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, cyborgs, education

Interesting look at the future of human augmentation.

To celebrate the launch of critically acclaimed video game DEUS EX: HUMAN REVOLUTION, Square Enix has commissioned filmmaker Rob Spence aka Eyeborg (a self proclaimed cyborg who lost an eye replaced it with a wireless video camera) to investigate prosthetics, cybernetics and human augmentation.

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Nov 14, 2015

Single Artificial Neuron Taught to Recognize Hundreds of Patterns

Posted by in categories: education, robotics/AI

Biologists have long puzzled over why neurons have thousands of synapses. Now neuroscientists have shown they are crucial not just for recognizing patterns but for learning the sequence in which they appear.

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Nov 11, 2015

Billions in Change Official Film

Posted by in categories: education, food

The world is facing some huge problems. There’s a lot of talk about how to solve them. But talk doesn’t reduce pollution, or grow food, or heal the sick. That takes doing. This film is the story about a group of doers, the elegantly simple inventions they have made to change the lives of billions of people, and the unconventional billionaire spearheading the project.

Join us at:

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Nov 11, 2015

Space Elevator Concept Stars in ‘Sky Line’ Documentary

Posted by in categories: education, space

Going up? Attention space elevator button pushers!

A feature-length documentary called “Sky Line” is being released this month, an impressive view that follows a group of scientists and entrepreneurs as egos collide in an attempt to reach for the stars.

The film, which centers on the real-life building of the once fantastical space elevator concept, will debut at DOC NYC 2015 – America’s largest documentary festival — and will be released on all major On Demand platforms on November 20th, 2015.

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Oct 31, 2015

Russian scientist seeks immortality, injects himself with 3.5-million-year-old bacteria

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, life extension

In the Holy Bible, Jesus Christ taught us how to attain eternal life. In John 6:71, for example, Jesus Christ said: “Truly, truly, I say to you, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. Whoever feeds on my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up on the last day.”

A Russian scientist, however, believes that he can have eternal life through the power of science, more specifically through the power of 3.5-million-year-old bacteria.

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Oct 23, 2015

Landmark Is Working On A Virtual Reality World’s Fair — By Stephanie Topacio Long | Digital Trends

Posted by in categories: business, education, human trajectories, media & arts, virtual reality


“Technology is finally catching up with Landmark Entertainment Group’s big ideas. The global entertainment design firm announced Thursday that it is collaborating with Pavilion of Me to create a virtual reality experience called the Virtual World’s Fair that will launch in 2017.”

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Oct 22, 2015

Arctic Explorers Uncover (and Eat) 60-Year-Old Food Stash — By Danny Lewis |

Posted by in categories: education, food, geography


“While exploring the coldest parts of the planet, even the smallest snacks can be a lifesaver. In case of emergencies (or sometimes to for a future treat), polar explorers will leave caches of food and supplies along their return route. … Recently, a teams of researchers camped out in Greenland’s arctic desert discovered one such cache—ration tins left behind by an expedition about 60 years ago.”

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Oct 21, 2015

Global Scenarios and National Workshops to Address Future Work/Technology Dynamics are being scheduled by The Millennium Project | PRWeb

Posted by in categories: business, disruptive technology, economics, education, futurism, policy


“The nature of work, employment, jobs, and economics will have to change over the next 35 years, or the world will face massive unemployment by 2050. This was a key conclusion of the Future Work/Technology 2050 study published in the “2015−16 State of the Future.”

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Oct 18, 2015

Cops are asking and 23andMe for their customers’ DNA

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, genetics

Micah's DNA
Brendan I. Koerner at Wired, explores the ramifications of the authorities requesting DNA from ancestry sites:

Mitch Morrissey, Denver’s district attorney and one of the nation’s leading advocates for familial DNA searching, stresses that the technology is “an innovative approach to investigating challenging cases, particularly cold cases where the victims are women or children and traditional investigative tactics fail to yield a solid suspect.” Familial DNA searches have indeed helped nab people who might otherwise have evaded justice. In the most celebrated example, Los Angeles police arrested a man believed to be the Grim Sleeper serial killer after discovering that the crime scene DNA shared a significant number of genetic markers with that of a convicted felon—who turned out to be the man’s son.

But the well-publicized success stories obscure the fact that familial DNA searches can generate more noise than signal. “Anyone who knows the science understands that there’s a high rate of false positives,” says Erin Murphy, a New York University law professor and the author of Inside the Cell: The Dark Side of Forensic DNA. The searches, after all, look for DNA profiles that are similar to the perpetrator’s but by no means identical, a scattershot approach that yields many fruitless leads, and for limited benefit. In the United Kingdom, a 2014 study found that just 17 percent of familial DNA searches “resulted in the identification of a relative of the true offender.”

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