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Archive for the ‘particle physics’ category

Jun 27, 2016

How The Majorana Fermion Is Going To Change The World

Posted by in categories: computing, education, particle physics, quantum physics

We now have a way to do tracibility in QC.


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Chinese scientists won a major victory recently, by proving that the Majorana fermion — a particle we’ve found tantalizing hints of for years — genuinely exists. This discovery has huge implications for quantum computing, and it might change the world. But how?

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Jun 26, 2016

Quantum Computing: A Primer

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

This video is worthless. I hear a person who is out of touch with the QC work and isn’t even aware all of the work going on. Frankly, QC is being worked on by big tech (Amazon, Google, Microsoft, D-Wave, IBM), governmental labs and incubators, limited set of start ups who are also (in many cases tied to big tech), and university research labs. Therefore, I don’t really find this soapbox video that informative as well as not in touch with where QC is today. It appears to me that this guy has sour grapes over not being engaged.

At least if you’re going to get on a soapbox and try to talk about QC like you’re somehow an expert or informed; at least make sure you know what has been shown, reported, and in development currently that has been publically announced so that you don’t look like you’re an un-informed consultant doing a superficial presentation and didn’t even bother doing the due diligence 1st. Otherwise, you just discredited your VC/ firm to the public and to those working on QC.


watch time: 28 minutes

One of the key insights that legendary physicist and Nobel Prize laureate Richard Feynman had was that quantum mechanics (the branch of physics that deals with subatomic particles, uncertainty principle, and many other concepts beyond classic physics) is just way too complicated to simulate using traditional computers.

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Jun 26, 2016

Experimental quantum computer manages first high-energy physics simulation

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Nice.


Quantum computing makes small, but significant progress.

A high-energy physics experiment has been completed using a simple quantum device that, if scaled up, could potentially greatly outperform a conventional computer.

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Jun 24, 2016

Gun Fusion: Two barrels to the stars

Posted by in categories: chemistry, nuclear energy, particle physics

To start a fusion reaction, you have to create extreme conditions. A combination of stellar temperatures, incredible pressures and lightning-quick energy dumps have all been tried to create these conditions, with varying degrees of success.

In this post, we’ll look at a low-cost, low-energy method of achieving nuclear fusion. It’s not Cold Fusion, it’s Gun Fusion.

Understanding what’s difficult

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Jun 24, 2016

Watch The Universe is-Expanding Faster Than the Laws of Physics Can give details, New Measurements Reveal

Posted by in categories: evolution, particle physics, space

Physicists in the US presently made the most precise measurement ever made of the present rate of growth of the Universe, but there is a problem: our Universe is expanding 8 percent quicker than our present laws of physics can give details. Currently astronomers are looking over once more at their measurements and if turn out to be right, this latest measurement will automatically force us to redefine how dark substance and dark energy have been manipulating the evolution of the Universe for the past 13.8 billion years, and that can’t be done without changing or addition something in the typical model of particle Physics.

Jun 24, 2016

These microbes can live on pure electricity

Posted by in categories: biological, particle physics, space

It may seem like something from science fiction, but researchers have found a group of microorganisms that can live off of pure electricity, reports. All life uses electricity, but scientists long thought it impossible for a cell to directly consume and expel electrons. That’s because fatty cell membranes act as insulators, preventing the flow of electricity. Scientists have now found evidence that some cells can discharge electrons through specialized proteins in their membranes, and others can ingest electrons from an electrode by using an enzyme that creates hydrogen atoms. Still others might be able to directly consume electrons, though that research has yet to be published. The findings could help researchers understand how life thrives under a variety of conditions, and how it could exist on places like Mars.

Jun 22, 2016

Particle zoo in a quantum computer

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics

Excellent story and highlights how Quantum computers may provide a way to overcome the obstacles around particle physics because QC can simulate certain aspects of elementary particle physics in a well-controlled quantum system.


Physicists in Innsbruck have realized the first quantum simulation of lattice gauge theories, building a bridge between high-energy theory and atomic physics. In the journal Nature, Rainer Blatt’s and Peter Zoller’s research teams describe how they simulated the creation of elementary particle pairs out of the vacuum by using a quantum computer.

Jun 21, 2016

Quantum calculations broaden the understanding of crystal catalysts

Posted by in categories: chemistry, particle physics, quantum physics, supercomputing

Using numerical modelling, researchers from Russia, the US, and China have discovered previously unknown features of rutile TiO2, which is a promising photocatalyst. The calculations were performed at an MIPT laboratory on the supercomputer Rurik. A paper detailing the results has been published in the journal Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics.

It’s all on the surface

Special substances called catalysts are needed to accelerate or induce certain chemical reactions. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is a good photocatalyst—when exposed to light, it effectively breaks down water molecules as well as hazardous organic contaminants. TiO2 is naturally found in the form of rutile and other minerals. One of the two most active surfaces of rutile R-TiO2 is a surface that is denoted as (011). The photocatalytic activity is linked to the way in which oxygen and titanium atoms are arranged on the surface. This is why it is important to understand which forms the surface of rutile can take.

Jun 21, 2016

Measuring Planck’s constant, NIST’s watt balance brings world closer to new kilogram

Posted by in categories: information science, particle physics, quantum physics

A high-tech version of an old-fashioned balance scale at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has just brought scientists a critical step closer toward a new and improved definition of the kilogram. The scale, called the NIST-4 watt balance, has conducted its first measurement of a fundamental physical quantity called Planck’s constant to within 34 parts per billion — demonstrating the scale is accurate enough to assist the international community with the redefinition of the kilogram, an event slated for 2018.

The redefinition-which is not intended to alter the value of the kilogram’s mass, but rather to define it in terms of unchanging fundamental constants of nature-will have little noticeable effect on everyday life. But it will remove a nagging uncertainty in the official kilogram’s mass, owing to its potential to change slightly in value over time, such as when someone touches the metal artifact that currently defines it.

Planck’s constant lies at the heart of quantum mechanics, the theory that is used to describe physics at the scale of the atom and smaller. Quantum mechanics began in 1900 when Max Planck described how objects radiate energy in tiny packets known as “quanta.” The amount of energy is proportional to a very small quantity called h, known as Planck’s constant, which subsequently shows up in almost all equations in quantum mechanics. The value of h — according to NIST’s new measurement — is 6.62606983×10−34 kg?m2/s, with an uncertainty of plus or minus 22 in the last two digits.

Jun 21, 2016

Using Enzymes to Enhance LEDs

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, particle physics, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

Robert Dunleavy had just started his sophomore year at Lehigh University when he decided he wanted to take part in a research project. He sent an email to Bryan Berger, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, who invited Dunleavy to his lab.

Berger and his colleagues were conducting experiments on tiny semiconductor particles called quantum dots. The optical and electronic properties of QDs make them useful in lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), medical imaging, solar cells, and other applications.

Dunleavy joined Berger’s group and began working with cadmium sulfide (CdS), one of the compounds from which QDs are fabricated. The group’s goal was to find a better way of producing CdS quantum dots, which are currently made with toxic chemicals in an expensive process that requires high pressure and temperature.

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