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Archive for the ‘biological’ category

May 25, 2016

The quantum world view and vedanta

Posted by in categories: evolution, quantum physics

Luv this article (science meets philosophical theory on the evolution of science); reminds me of an article that one of my Quantum friends shared yesterday on Linkedin Pulse.


Science is the biggest enterprise that man ever created. Of all the living things on this planet, man is the only one that seems to have started thinking about how this world works. To understand that he started this new venture, called Science, which was originally meant just to understand how this world works. Some exceptionally brilliant minds did accidentally stumble upon some understanding of the world’s laws like gravity, buoyancy, and others in the west while Indian sages had realised this much earlier.

Next step was to find out how the world works by doing some experiments. That was the stage when the Churches started obstructing “Science” as this kind of scientific enquiry, the Church felt, might interfere with religious beliefs. That is where the first conflict between religion and science started. The fall out was that scientists subconsciously developed an aversion to the God concept in religion and thus God was kept out of the scientific realm. Let us, therefore, think from now on. Science, then, was more of a hobby for the well to do. The leading lights of that generation were Isaac Newton and Albert Einstein. There were a host of others but less illustrious than these two. Newton’s Laws of deterministic predictability and Einstein’s laws of relativity together founded a world view of “space-time” constraints where everything else out with this space time module was rejected.

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May 25, 2016

Is aging inevitable? Not necessarily for sea urchins

Posted by in categories: biological, genetics, health, life extension

Sea urchins are remarkable organisms. They can quickly regrow damaged spines and feet. Some species also live to extraordinary old ages and—even more remarkably—do so with no signs of poor health, such as a decline in regenerative capacity or an increase in age-related mortality. These ocean Methuselahs even reproduce as if they were still youngsters.

MDI Biological Laboratory Associate Professor James A. Coffman, Ph.D., is studying the of sea urchins in hopes that a deeper understanding of the process of regeneration, which governs the regeneration of aging tissues as well as lost or damaged body parts, will lead to a deeper understanding of the aging process in humans, with whom sea urchins share a close genetic relationship.

In a paper recently published in Aging Cell, a leading journal in the field of aging biology, with Andrea G. Bodnar, Ph.D., of the Bermuda Institute of Ocean Studies, the scientists shed new light on the aging process in sea urchins, raising the prospect that the physical decline that typically accompanies aging is not inevitable.

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May 24, 2016

US biochemist wins award for rewriting DNA to mimic evolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, evolution

US biochemical engineer Frances Arnold on Tuesday won a million-euro technology prize in Finland for her work on “directed evolution”, a method of rewriting DNA to improve medicines and develop green fuels.

“Frances Arnold receives the 2016 Millennium Technology Prize in recognition of her discoveries that launched the field of ‘directed evolution’, which mimics natural evolution to create new and better proteins in the laboratory,” the Technology Academy Finland, which awards the prize at two-year intervals, said in a statement.

Arnold, 59, who is a professor of chemical engineering at California Institute of Technology, said her work made it possible to “solve human problems”, such as replacing toxic chemicals like fossil fuels.

May 19, 2016

Multicellular Life Was Caused By The Same Gene That Suppresses Cancer

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution

Biologists have identified the one gene that caused the evolution of single-celled organisms into multicellularity, debunking previous theories that several genes were at play. The gene retinoblastoma is also the same gene that is found to be defective in cancer patients, and suppresses tumors.

May 18, 2016

Cosmic dust on Earth reveals clues to ancient atmosphere

Posted by in category: biological

The oldest space dust yet found on Earth suggests that the ancient atmosphere of Earth had significantly more oxygen than previously thought, a new study finds.

Although oxygen gas currently makes up about one-fifth of Earth’s air, there was at least 100,000 times less oxygen in the primordial atmosphere, researchers say. Oxygen easily reacts with other molecules, which means it readily gets bound to other elements and pulled from the atmosphere.

Previous research suggests that significant levels of oxygen gas started permanently building up in the atmosphere with the Great Oxidation Event, which occurred about 2.4 billion years ago. This event was most likely caused by cyanobacteria — microbes that, like plants, photosynthesize and release oxygen. [Infographic: Earth’s Atmosphere Top to Bottom].

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May 16, 2016

Meet George Church, the brash biologist out to upend evolution

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, life extension

George Church is pushing the boundaries of science!


Harvard biologist George Church wants to reverse aging, reanimate a mammoth, and build an entire human genome from scratch. What makes him tick?

May 14, 2016

Newly discovered microbe does something textbooks say is impossible: it lives without mitochondria

Posted by in category: biological

According to established scientific knowledge, complex cells (called eukaryotic cells) can’t survive without mitochondria — tiny organelles that control respiration and power movement and growth. You can think of them as tiny batteries converting energy so that cells can go about their business, but they perform other key jobs, too. They are, as the common adage goes, the powerhouse of the cell.

Now, scientists working in Canada and the Czech Republic have made a surprising discovery: a eukaryotic cell without these mitochondrial batteries. It’s an unprecedented find that’s likely to change our thinking about how some types of cells can exist and grow. In other words, life is more flexible than we thought.

“[Mitochondria] were considered to be absolutely indispensable components of the eukaryotic cell and the hallmark of the eukaryotic cell,” team leader, Anna Karnkowska from the University of British Columbia told Nell Greenfieldboyce at NPR.

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May 13, 2016

Bringing The Dead Back To Life — Reanima Project / Bioquark Inc. Media Coverage

Posted by in categories: aging, bioengineering, biological, cryonics, disruptive technology, futurism, health, life extension, neuroscience, transhumanism

Fox 29 — Good Day Philadelphia

http://www.fox29.com/140735577-video

Reanimalogo

NBC TV 10

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May 11, 2016

Can plants grow on the moon? NASA plans test in 2015

Posted by in categories: biological, climatology, habitats, space travel

We knew this was going to happen. Just still neat to read about it.


(Phys.org) —NASA is planning to launch a milestone experiment involving growing plants on the moon. The target date is 2015, when the agency will deposit plants on the moon’s surface. The initiative is being driven by the Lunar Plant Growth Habitat team. They intend to use coffee-can sized containers designed to protect the plants against harsh elements of the climate, and will also provide cameras, sensors, and electronics in order to relay information about how the plants fare back to earth. NASA’s plan is “to develop a very simple sealed growth chamber that can support germination over a five to-ten day period in a spacecraft on the Moon.”

What will NASA try to grow? The containers will attempt to grow turnip, basil and Arabidopsis The latter is used often in plant research; Simon Gilroy, University of Wisconsin-Madison botany professor, has referred to the Arabidopsis as “the lab rat of plant biology.” Will the life forms survive the lunar surface? NASA’s plan is to find some answers when this “self-contained habitat,” which will have a mass of about 1 kg and would be a payload on a commercial lunar lander, is on the , How it gets there is another interesting side of the story, because NASA is taking advantage of a parallel event to save costs significantly.

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May 9, 2016

Artificial Intelligence Evolution: Future AI Technologies To Make AI Obsolete And Intertwine Physical, Digital Realities?

Posted by in categories: evolution, robotics/AI, singularity

The troubling piece of this article is that the article leaves out how the underlying technology will need to change in order for AI to truly intertwine with humans. AI in the existing infrastructure and digital technology with no support of BMI, microbots, etc. will not evolve us to Singularity by itself and without changes to the existing digital landscape.


As artificial intelligence continuously evolves, the future of AI is also becoming more significantly challenging to perceive and comprehend for humans.

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