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Archive for the ‘engineering’ category

Jun 29, 2016

Injectable Computers

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, Professors David Blaauw (http://web.eecs.umich.edu/faculty/blaauw/) and David Wentzloff (http://web.eecs.umich.edu/~wentzlof/) from the University of Michigan’s Electrical and Computer Engineering Department (https://www.eecs.umich.edu/ece/) are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

With this enabling technology, real time information can be applied to devices monitoring heart fibrillation as well as glucose monitoring for diabetics.

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Jun 28, 2016

Futures: Interfacing with DARPA’s cyborg soldiers

Posted by in categories: cyborgs, engineering, evolution, neuroscience, supercomputing

BMI technology is like anything else; you have an evolution process to finally reach a level of maturity. The good news is that at least at this point of time BMI is at least in that cycle where we are no longer crawling and trying to stand up. We’re in that stage of the cycle where we are standing up and taking a couple of steps at a time. In the next 3 to 5 years, things should be extremely interesting in the BMI space especially as we begin to introduce more sophisticated technology to our connected infrastructure.


Will future soldiers be able to use a direct brain interface to control their hardware?

Imagine if the brain could tell a machine what to do without having to type, speak or use other standard interfaces. That’s the aim of the US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), which has committed US$60 million to a Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) project to do just that.

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Jun 27, 2016

How Ove Arup Brought Engineers Out Of The Shadows — By Meg Miller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, engineering

3061191-inline-10-how-ove-arups-total-design-philosophy

“The legendary engineer’s building philosophy has never been more relevant. This summer, he’s getting his first major museum retrospective.”

Read more

Jun 23, 2016

Physicists create a high-precision ‘quantum ruler’

Posted by in categories: engineering, quantum physics

Physicists from the Russian Quantum Center (RQC), MIPT, the Lebedev Physical Institute, and L’Institut d’Optique (Palaiseau, France) have devised a method for creating a special quantum entangled state. This state enables producing a high-precision ruler capable of measuring large distances to an accuracy of billionths of a metre. The results of the study have been published in Nature Communications (“Loss-tolerant state engineering for quantum-enhanced metrology via the reverse Hong–Ou–Mandel effect”).

“This technique will enable us to use quantum effects to increase the accuracy of measuring the distance between observers that are separated from one another by a medium with losses. In this type of medium, quantum features of light are easily destroyed,” says Alexander Lvovsky, a co-author of the paper, the head of the RQC scientific team that conducted the research, and a professor of the University of Calgary.

Alexander Ulanov in the Laboratory of quantum optics in RQC

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Jun 21, 2016

Using Enzymes to Enhance LEDs

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, particle physics, quantum physics, solar power, sustainability

Robert Dunleavy had just started his sophomore year at Lehigh University when he decided he wanted to take part in a research project. He sent an email to Bryan Berger, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering, who invited Dunleavy to his lab.

Berger and his colleagues were conducting experiments on tiny semiconductor particles called quantum dots. The optical and electronic properties of QDs make them useful in lasers, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), medical imaging, solar cells, and other applications.

Dunleavy joined Berger’s group and began working with cadmium sulfide (CdS), one of the compounds from which QDs are fabricated. The group’s goal was to find a better way of producing CdS quantum dots, which are currently made with toxic chemicals in an expensive process that requires high pressure and temperature.

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Jun 15, 2016

Android Creator Andy Rubin Bets Big On Quantum Computing And Smartphone AI

Posted by in categories: computing, engineering, mobile phones, neuroscience, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Smart man.


Android creator Andy Rubin has several tricks up his sleeve. Rubin’s company Playground is currently tinkering with quantum computing and smartphone AI, and he believes that this combination could create a conscious intelligence that would underpin all of technology.

andy rubin

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Jun 14, 2016

These Experiments Are Building the Case to Terraform Mars

Posted by in categories: engineering, environmental, space

Maybe the researchers needs to meet with the professor out in University of WA who has been experimenting in shifting weather patterns such as making some areas have more rains while other areas not have as much rain.


If we want to live on Mars, we need to make it warm and wet again.

Jun 13, 2016

Breakthrough technology to improve cyber security

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, engineering, particle physics, quantum physics

Another article on Quantum Security; this time from Sydney (generating single photons to make communications and information secured).


With enough computing effort most contemporary security systems will be broken. But a research team at the University of Sydney has made a major breakthrough in generating single photons (light particles), as carriers of quantum information in security systems.

The collaboration involving physicists at the Centre for Ultrahigh bandwidth Devices for Optical Systems (CUDOS), an ARC Centre of Excellence headquartered in the School of Physics, and electrical engineers from the School of Electrical and Information Engineering, has been published in Nature Communications.

The team’s work resolved a key issue holding back the development of password exchange which can only be broken by violating the laws of physics. Photons are generated in a pair, and detecting one indicates the existence of the other. This allows scientists to manage the timing of photon events so that they always arrive at the time they are expected.

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Jun 13, 2016

Quantum dots may hold key to superior 3D printing materials

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, chemistry, engineering, quantum physics

New research demonstrates that quantum dots solve a key issue with current 3D printing materials. I spoke with Keroles Riad, PhD student at Concordia University Montreal, Quebec, Canada, about his thesis on the photostability of materials used for stereolithography 3D printing. The research was supervised by Prof. Paula Wood-Adams, Prof. Rolf Wuthrich of the Mechanical and industrial engineering department at Concordia and Prof. Jerome Claverie of the Chemistry department at the University of Quebec in Montreal.

While quantum dots have been shown to cure acrylics, Riad says this work is the first demonstration of the process in epoxy resin.

3D printing is often richly rewarding because it spans multiple disciplines. Here we look at a new thesis that advances the critical area of materials. The approach taken uses engineering, chemistry and physics to overcome the issue of stability present in current stereolithography processes. The results could form the basis of superior materials and wider use of 3D printing in many areas.

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Jun 12, 2016

Nick Bostrom: ‘We are like small children playing with a bomb’

Posted by in categories: climatology, cybercrime/malcode, engineering, robotics/AI, sustainability

Some truth to this if the engineering team and designers are not reflective of the broader world population. Good example, is the super race research of the Nazis and attempts to make it happen. Today, AI in the hands of a N. Korea for example could be bad for the world. However, the larger threat that I see with AI is still the hacking of AI, and stolen AI by criminals to use against society.


Sentient machines are a greater threat to human existence than climate change, according to the Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom.

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