Archive for the ‘habitats’ category

Oct 24, 2016

Meet the Fully Programmable Linux Computer That’s Smaller Than a Coin

Posted by in categories: computing, habitats, media & arts, security

Microcomputers are great for learning about code and hardware. The VoCore2 Mini is the smallest ever, packing full Linux functionality and wireless connectivity into a coin-sized device. New Atlas Deals has it for just $42.99.

This impressive little computer is capable of running programs in C, Java, Ruby, JavaScript, and many other languages. This means you can code the VoCore2 to expand its functionality, turning it into a VPN gateway, airplay music station, and much more.

You can also augment the VoCore2 with hardware components for further tinkering fun. Add a USB webcam to turn it into a home security camera, attach a microphone to issue voice commands to Siri or Echo, and so on. Your projects are limited only by your imagination.

Oct 19, 2016

NASA Offers Prize Money for 3D-Printed Habitat Ideas

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, economics, habitats, space travel

NASA is offering $1.1 million in prize money in Phase 2 of the 3D-Printed Habitat Challenge for new ways to build houses where future space explorers can live and work.

The three-part competition asks citizen inventors to use readily available and recyclable materials for the raw material to print habitats.

Phase 2 focuses on the material technologies needed to manufacture structural components from a combination of indigenous materials and recyclables, or indigenous materials alone. NASA may use these technologies to construct shelters for future human explorers to Mars. On Earth, these same capabilities could also be used to produce affordable housing wherever it is needed or where access to conventional building materials and skills is limited.

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Oct 15, 2016

Obama pushes US goal to send humans to Mars

Posted by in categories: government, habitats, space travel

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama sought Tuesday to reinvigorate his call for the U.S. to send humans to Mars by the 2030s, showcasing budding partnerships between the U.S. government and commercial companies to develop spacecraft capable of carrying out the extraterrestrial mission.

Obama was calling attention to government contracts awarded to six companies to build prototypes for “habitats” that could sustain human life in deep space. He also said that within two years, private companies will send astronauts to the International Space Station, part of a program to allow companies to use an open docking port on the station to develop their own innovations.

“These missions will teach us how humans can live far from Earth, something we’ll need for the long journey to Mars,” Obama wrote in an op-ed on CNN’s website. He said the ultimate goal is for humans eventually to stay on the red planet “for an extended time.”

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Oct 10, 2016

HyperCells: buildings that can build themselves

Posted by in categories: futurism, habitats

Smart bricks that can self-assemble into structures could be the key to future disaster relief. Cathal O’Connell explains how they work.

Oct 3, 2016

About Neumann Space

Posted by in categories: government, habitats, space

Our mission is simple.

We believe humanity’s future lays in the stars. Our future home will be different worlds as Government initiatives turn into.

Sep 24, 2016

11 Most Fascinating 3D Printed Houses In The World

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

A 3D printed house, does it really exist? Here are the most fascinating 3D printed houses in the world, from tiny town cabins to an entire village.

“What’s wrong with brick and mortar, glass and concrete?”, you might ask. “Why to build a 3D printed house?” Apart from the obvious answer – because we can -, there are various good reasons for using 3D printing methods in constructing buildings:

Sep 20, 2016

‘Radiation shield’ found hidden in water bear genome

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, habitats

Tardigrades, tiny aquatic creatures found in habitats from backyard ponds to Antarctic glaciers, are tough enough to survive the radiation-fraught perils of space. But for a long time, scientists couldn’t agree on why the animals—also known as water bears—are so hardy. Now, researchers have identified a gene that protects the tardigrades’ DNA from radiation, BBC reports. The gene, called Dsup, showed its importance when researchers inserted it into human DNA strands and blasted them with x-rays. The modified genetic material suffered significantly less damage, they report today in. Scientists hope this finding will help them one day protect another animal—us—against radiation.

Sep 16, 2016

MRI scanner sees emotions flickering across an idle mind

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, habitats, neuroscience

As you relax and let your mind drift aimlessly, you might remember a pleasant vacation, an angry confrontation in traffic or maybe the loss of a loved one.

And now a team of researchers at Duke University say they can see those various emotional states flickering across the human brain.

“It’s getting to be a bit like mind-reading,” said Kevin LaBar, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at Duke. “Earlier studies have shown that functional MRI can identify whether a person is thinking about a face or a house. Our study is the first to show that specific emotions like fear and anger can be decoded from these scans as well.”

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Sep 8, 2016

Elon Musk is Looking to Kickstart Transhuman Evolution With “Brain Hacking” Tech

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, evolution, habitats, neuroscience, robotics/AI, singularity, sustainability, transhumanism

Elon Musk has recently hinted that he may be working on a “neural lace,” a mesh of electronics that will allow AI and the brain to work together. This could help human brains keep up with future enhancements in AI.

There’s no doubt that Elon Musk is one busy individual. When not playing on the Tesla factory floor, he may be bringing electric roofs to electric vehicles, or dreaming up the Hyperloop, or toying with the future of AI.

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Sep 7, 2016

The first ever copies of the ‘world’s most mysterious book’ are about to be released

Posted by in category: habitats

A Spanish publishing house has finally been given permission to make exact copies of the Voynich Manuscript — a 15th century book written in a mysterious coded language that no one has cracked.

For centuries, scientists have been trying to decipher the text. Some of the world’s best cryptographers have dedicated their lives to solving the puzzle — but no one’s even gotten close. Now, with almost 900 copies about to go into circulation, we might finally get some answers.

“The Voynich Manuscript has led some of the smartest people down rabbit holes for centuries,” Bill Sherman from the Folger Shakespeare Library told The Washington Post in 2014, when he was about to open an exhibit on the text.

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