Archive for the ‘habitats’ category

Nov 25, 2015

Veritasium Explores The Future of Energy — GE

Posted by in categories: energy, finance, habitats, health, transportation

Derek Muller of ‘Veritasium’ explores the impact of the Northeast blackout of 2003 and the innovations in energy that are essential to keeping the lights on. For more on the future of energy, check out Breakthrough’s ‘Energy on the Edge’ episode on the National Geographic Channel airing Sunday 11/29 at 9/8c.

Check Out Veritasium’s ‘How Long Will You Live’:

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Nov 24, 2015

Smart Bricks — A New Way to Build!

Posted by in category: habitats


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Nov 20, 2015

This is the best building in the world. It’s called “The Interlace.”

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Nov 16, 2015

An Italian company built a 40-foot tall 3D printer to help solve the global housing crisis

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

They want to use the printer to build homes for those in need.

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Nov 11, 2015

Cops Called After Tesla Model S Owners ‘Put A Child In The Trunk’

Posted by in categories: habitats, sustainability, transportation

Police waited at the home of a family after someone called in seeing the parents “put a child in the trunk” of the car — someone who clearly wasn’t aware that the Tesla Model S can be equipped with a third row of seats for children.

I stumbled upon this video after comments veteran and Twitter tweeter @_McMike_ tweeted it.

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Nov 5, 2015

World’s second vertical forest tower will rise in Switzerland

Posted by in categories: habitats, sustainability

Stefano Boeri Architetti won the bid just one year after completing their first acclaimed vertical forest, or Bosco Verticale, one year ago in Milan. Like its predecessor, the forested tower planned for Lausanne will be covered by shrubs and plants, and will add 3,000 square meters of greenery along its 117-meter-tall facade. The new tower is named “La Tour des Cedres” after the architects’ vision to install over 100 cedar trees on the structure.

Bernard Nicod e Avni Orllati, Stefano Boeri Architetti, Bosco Verticale, Lausanne, Switzerland, La Tour des Cedres, La Tour des Cedres by Stefano Boeri Architetti, Vertical Forest, Vertical Forest Stefano Boeri Architetti, green skyscraper, vertical forest tower,

Related: Bosco Verticale: World’s First Vertical Forest is Finally Complete in Milan.

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Oct 30, 2015

3D-printing earthquake-proof towns, brick by brick

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats

We can build structures that resettle after quakes, and self-cooling homes – the trick is to 3D print custom building blocks, not whole buildings.

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Oct 19, 2015

Amazing industrial 3D printer fits in a truck, can print an entire building in 24 hours

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, habitats, transportation

Created by Russian engineer Nikita Chen-yun-tai, the new Apis Cor 3D printer is powerful enough to print a building in one day, yet small enough to be moved with minimal preparation and transportation costs. This portability allows users to print a building in one location and easily move the Apis Cor the next day to another spot. It promises to revolutionize the use of 3D printers in construction, especially in developing nations where low-cost, efficient printing is critical.

The 3D printing of houses is not a new idea — companies have been using the tenets of additive manufacturing for years. What makes the compact Apis Cor printer unique is the unit’s small size — it measures 16.4 ft by 5 ft, weighs 2.5 tons and can be assembled within 30 minutes. As a result, the Apis Cor can be moved easily without the need for an expensive method of transportation and setup. It requires no site preparation and no testing before use, which means it can be dropped on site and deployed right away after assembly.

Related: A Chinese company assembled this 3D-printed home in just three hours.

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Oct 10, 2015

Massachusetts emerges as a robot industry powerhouse

Posted by in categories: engineering, habitats, robotics/AI

Seventeen years ago, Helen Greiner was scrambling to find investors to back her company’s development of a robot that would clean people’s houses. As she made the rounds of venture capitalists, the responses ranged from “You’re not an Internet company” to “You’re too early stage” to “I would do this, but my partners would kill me.”

But Greiner and her partners, Colin Angle and MIT robotics professor Rodney Brooks, persevered, funneling money from their firm’s contract engineering work to fund the robot project. Today, that company, iRobot Corp. of Bedford, is one of the nation’s largest makers of home robots, generating more than $500 million in annual sales from its Roomba floor vacuum and other products, and employing 600 people, including 500 in Massachusetts.

iRobot is an anchor of a burgeoning Massachusetts robotics industry that includes more than 100 companies, employs more than 3,000, and attracts tens, if not hundreds, of millions of dollars of investments. Since 2008, at least 20 robotics startups have launched in Massachusetts. Venture capital funding of the local industry tripled to more than $60 million in 2012, the most recent year available, from less than $20 million in 2008, according to the Massachusetts Technology Leadership Council, a trade group in Burlington.

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Oct 8, 2015

Meet the laundry-folding washing machine of our lazy-ass future

Posted by in categories: electronics, habitats, robotics/AI

Socks are the hardest. For a future washing machine that washes, dries and then folds the results, it’s one of the small barriers that remains in that latter stage. But as a research project that started back in 2008, Laundroid is finally getting there. Next year, the collaboration between housing firm Daiwa House, electronics company Panasonic and Seven Dreamers will start offering preorders, the year after that ‘beta’ machines, then folding machines for big institutions, with event full retail planned the year after that — we’ll be in 2019 by then. (That said, the all-in-one model is still at the in-development stage). There’s no price and the presentation we saw added in a bunch of mosaic filtering on top as the shirt gradually got folded so you couldn’t see how the thing actually works. But that’s okay. We can wait. It’s not going to stop us waiting our chore-dodging dreams to come true.

While the video teaser above gives you pretty much nothing of substance, at the on-stage demonstration, we saw a just-washed tee take a matter of minutes for the internal tech to sort, identify and fold. The tech involved is separated into two very separate parts: image analysis and robotics. With a hypothetical bundle of clothes, each item demands different folding (we’re going to say) techniques, so the machine needs to figure what that soft lump of cloth is, then prime it for folding. The presentation here at CEATEC elaborated (if only lightly) on the stages it’s taken to get to here: it’s been a pretty long journey.

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