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Archive for the ‘media & arts’ category

Sep 3, 2015

Lyfe

Posted by in category: media & arts

With the standard of a gamified social media, two young adults meet for a date with the expectation of personal fulfillment.

Alex Stanton’s Thesis Project for Full Sail University’s Digital Cinematography Bachelor’s of Science program.

Directed by: Alex Stanton vimeo.com/alexstanton, Brent Howard.
Story by: Pride. St. Clair.
Cinematography by: Josh Russell vimeo.com/joshrussell
Original Music Composed by: Josh Wilson.
Title Design: Chris Koelsch vimeo.com/thisnthat
Starring: Justin Stanton.
Lissy Smith vimeo.com/user9221474
Dylan Stretchbery vimeo.com/user27301393
Daniel Lee Robertson III

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Aug 27, 2015

Political polarization on Twitter depends on the issue | Phys.org

Posted by in category: media & arts

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““To some extent, social media platforms can promote democratic deliberation and the exchange of ideas from different perspectives,” says Barberá. “Even for the most divisive topics, such as the 2012 presidential election, we did not see a perfect division on Twitter — while people may encounter political views that they agree with, they’ll encounter divergent opinions as well.””

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Aug 25, 2015

Dune, 50 years on: how a science fiction novel changed the world — By Hari Kunzru | The Guardian

Posted by in categories: astronomy, media & arts, philosophy, science, space travel, sustainability, water

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“It has sold millions of copies, is perhaps the greatest novel in the science-fiction canon and Star Wars wouldn’t have existed without it. Frank Herbert’s Dune should endure as a politically relevant fantasy from the Age of Aquarius.”

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Aug 21, 2015

Art Or Design?: Welcome To The Improvisational Carpentry Of Nicolás Aracena Müller — By Diana Budds | Fast Company

Posted by in category: media & arts

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“Müller, who is based in Chile, calls the concept improvisational carpentry. He traveled to New York and wandered the city streets and dove into dumpsters searching for materials he could turn into pieces that are part sculpture, part theater, and part design. He believes that working with cast-off items reflects the city’s character. (The mottled woods certainly captures New York’s tougher side.)”

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Aug 18, 2015

At Last, a Wearable You Will Want to Wear — By Chander Chawla | Forbes

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, business, innovation, materials, media & arts, robotics/AI, wearables

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“I am excited to introduce the first wave of TechLuxe in a form of a resin handbag with an LCD video screen. The idea is to radically bring technology to fashion, but with creative beauty within a functional beautifully designed bag.”

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Aug 17, 2015

Let the egames begin — By Barney Thompson | Financial Times

Posted by in categories: business, computing, entertainment, media & arts

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“Electronic sports (esports), or competitive computer gaming, is an industry on the move. Depending on who you ask, there are somewhere between 90 million to 135 million esports enthusiasts — defined as those who watch gaming regularly, online or off — and more than double that number of occasional viewers. According to a recent SuperData report, the esports sector will this year generate an estimated revenue of $621m worldwide.”

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Jul 17, 2015

Ray Kurzweil music technology breakthroughs – inside story | KurzweilAI

Posted by in categories: innovation, media & arts

Kurzweil 250 prototype boards (credit: Tim Thompson/Kurzweil Music Systems/Young Chang)

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Jun 16, 2015

Esther Perel: Sex, Stability, and Self-Fulfillment

Posted by in categories: education, ethics, futurism, human trajectories, media & arts, philosophy

In the Galactic Public Archives film Click Here for Happiness Prof. Yair Amichai-Hamburger contends that even though technology allows us to connect with one another in unprecedented ways, “loneliness is the disease of the 21st century.” From Hamburger’s perspective, communication technology (coupled with human nature) tempts us to mistake superficial connections for meaningful ones, urges us to value quantity over quality. It creates new opportunities for experiencing the best of what it means to be human, but often our interaction with technology suggests something more akin to an addict on a new drug.

Therapist and author Esther Perel uses this film to explore our ‘existential aloneness’ through a different lens. Much as technology continues to open new doors for connection, the rapid cultural changes of the past 100 years allow us to choose the sort of life we wish to live. We make our most important connections by choice instead of having them mandated to us by tradition. But as is the case with technology, sometimes it isn’t clear if we are primed to use these new opportunities to build more fulfilling lives or simply to frustrate ourselves, building a world where more people feel alone.

Has our increased valuing of independence and self-fulfillment created a fatal conflict with the romantic ideal of ‘the couple?’ Can we have it all or do we need to choose between freedom and belonging? Perel isn’t sure that we can have it all, but she thinks that we can carve out a path that delivers more to more of us than would a retreat into tradition. “Let’s not romanticize the past. I don’t think that the fate of women in those marriages was particularly glorious. It seems that quite a few people were waiting to get out.” Perel argues that the only way that the future of ‘the couple’ can be navigated satisfactorily is if we continue to build upon the social progress of the past century. “You need two people who have equal power to have this communication, or to have this negotiation even able to take place without it being a power maneuver. If it doesn’t happen between two emancipated people it [becomes] a power system, which it was throughout history.”

What do you hope to build in a relationship? What connections do you value? What are your boundaries?

Jun 12, 2015

Couples, Culture and Sex: Who is Esther Perel?

Posted by in categories: education, ethics, futurism, human trajectories, media & arts, philosophy

What do you hope to find in a relationship? Security or freedom? Adventure or Intimacy? Do you want the connections in your life to serve as aides on your personal journey or do you want to feel you belong to a larger endeavor?

The future is often discussed in regard to technology, but when we look towards our personal futures we tend to think not of gizmos but of relationships. We think of the connections we want to build and experience, and the things that we wish to give the world in return. We think about how the world could be a better place for ourselves as well as those around us. The change we envision is not technological; rather it reflects what we value. In this film, therapist and author Esther Perel argues that the patterns in which we connect, and the conventions that guide how we couple present a window into what our culture really values.

When Perel looks at the ways in which we connect in early the 21st century she sees contradictions. The rapid technological and social shifts of the previous centuries have created conflicts not only within our cultures but also in the hopes and desires of the individual. She finds us looking with one eye to the secure and charted path that the norms of the past seem to offer us. With the other eye we look to the opportunities and fluid freedoms that now seem open to us. Can we coherently (and satisfactorily) reconcile these desires?

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Jun 12, 2015

So, Uber Just Released Its Own Videogame — Davey Alba Wired

Posted by in categories: business, entertainment, fun, media & arts, transportation

Uber, the multibillion-dollar on-demand rides company, wouldn’t be able to execute its global grand plan without the million drivers who have offered rides on its platform. Over the past five years, the company has relied on myriad tactics to lure new drivers in and keep them happy: rallies, ads, word-of-mouth, even a quarterly magazine. Now it’s trying another strategy: a videogame.

The company today released UberDRIVE, an iOS game that essentially mimics what it’s like to drive for Uber. Players “pick up” passengers and drive them from point A to point B. The more efficient the route they choose, the more points they can rack up in the game. If players earn consistently high ratings, they can unlock new cars and explore new areas of the city. The game also includes fun facts on important landmarks in the city, as well as a “trivia mode” where riders quiz drivers (the player) on certain destinations on the map. At launch, the game only includes a virtual San Francisco, though it’s available to play nationwide. If the game is successful, Uber says it will add new cities to the app soon. Read more

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