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Archive for the ‘media & arts’ category

Jun 22, 2016

Ray Kurzweil — The Age of Intelligent Machines Documentary

Posted by in categories: education, media & arts, Ray Kurzweil, robotics/AI

The Age of Intelligent Machines was written and produced for the science museum exhibition “Robots and Beyond: The Age of Intelligent Machines” by Ray Kurzweil in 1987. This film was produced for a mainstream audience, and focuses on developments in artificial intelligence. Soundtrack features music by award winning recording artist Stevie Wonder. Film series features two parts: “Machines that Think” and “Intelligence, It’s Amazing!”

Jun 21, 2016

5 Places That Pay You To Live There

Posted by in category: media & arts

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Jun 20, 2016

These Sunglasses Play Music Through Your Skull

Posted by in categories: futurism, media & arts

These sunglasses let you listen to music while still hearing the rest of the world.

Jun 16, 2016

University of Surrey Professor and BBC presenter receives Stephen Hawking Medal

Posted by in categories: entertainment, media & arts

Nice.


Renowned physicist, author and broadcaster, Professor Jim Al-Khalili OBE, has been awarded the inaugural Stephen Hawking Medal for Science Communication.

Professor Jim Al-Khalili is the first person to be honoured for his contribution to science with this, first medal of its kind, at STARMUS International Science and Arts Festival in Tenerife on 29 June 2016.

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Jun 7, 2016

Astronomers Recorded This Eerie Music From a 13-Billion-Year-Old Star

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space

Space is not the soundless vacuum movies would have us believe. In fact, judging by these eerie recordings of the music being thrown off by the oldest stars in the Milky Way, space actually sounds like a bit of a party.

The recordings were created by a team of scientists led by Andrea Miglio of the University of Birmingham, using data from NASA’s Kepler missions. After measuring the acoustic oscillations of some of the furthest known distant stars in the Milky Way’s M4 star cluster, the researchers were able to use that data to recreate the sounds and get an idea of just what noises the stars are throwing off. It’s a cacophony, for sure—but a surprisingly musical one that could slide pretty seamlessly into an ambient house track of your choice. (Free idea, DJs.)

Besides being excellent listening, the sounds are also scientifically useful. Measuring the tones from each star let the researchers derive a formula, which they’ve published today in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, to get more precise measurements of star masses and ages. Since the stars are so old, in some cases up to 13 billion years, researchers hope to use the sounds to get even more information about what the universe was like way back then.

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Jun 4, 2016

$17M to shape the future of music

Posted by in categories: engineering, media & arts

Very cool!


Schulich’s Music Multimedia Room has been used as a laboratory for CIRMMT and a favourite recording studio for orchestra-size ensembles since the Elizabeth Wirth Music Building opened in 2005.

By Lev Bratishenko.

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Jun 3, 2016

Entrepreneur and CEO Martine Rothblatt thinks we’ll 3D print new bodies and live forever on the internet

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, education, habitats, law, life extension, media & arts, neuroscience, robotics/AI

When you think about the headliners at a music festival, it’s unlikely that the first person to pop into your head would be Martine Rothblatt—the founder of Sirius XM, the one-time highest-paid female CEO in the world who made a robot clone of her wife, and the founder of the Terasem religion, which believes we’ll live forever by uploading our consciousness to the cloud. But Moogfest, a four-day citywide festival of music and technology in Durham, North Carolina, was not the average music festival. Unlike other festivals that make cursory overtures to technology, Moogfest dedicated as much time to explaining how technology influences creativity as to the creative output itself, even listing headline ‘technologists’ alongside its top-billed musical acts.

On the festival’s second day, Friday 20 May, Rothblatt took the stage to talk to a packed house at Durham’s Carolina Theater, in an atmosphere that felt far more like a TED talk than a music fest. Rothblatt, who is transgender, discussed the contentious North Carolina HB2 law, which bans transgender people from using public bathrooms of the gender they identify with; the idea that creativity would be better encouraged by free college tuition; and how she got to a point where she and her company, United Therapeutics, can actually think about 3D printing new body parts, and leaving our bodies behind—if we want. “You want to win more than you want to live,” she told the rapt crowd. “You yell ‘Geronimo’ as you jump crazily into monopolistic opposition.”

Quartz sat down with Rothblatt after her talk to chat more about her thoughts on AI, living forever, free education, and what happens to the soul once we’ve made digital copies of ourselves.

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Jun 2, 2016

A Sci-fi Cyberpunk Thriller HD: “Temple”

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, media & arts

ENJOY!!! 2045 A.D. Cybernetically enhanced beings are in control of society. A new genetic disease is making humans reject their own organs, forcing one man to steal cybernetic implants from others to survive. By director Nguyen-Anh Nguyen.

Temple is a concept for a feature film project, produced by the team of the Akira Project.

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May 30, 2016

Fast, stretchy circuits could yield new wave of wearable electronics

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics, internet, media & arts, wearables

The consumer marketplace is flooded with a lively assortment of smart wearable electronics that do everything from monitor vital signs, fitness or sun exposure to play music, charge other electronics or even purify the air around you — all wirelessly.

Now, a team of University of Wisconsin—Madison engineers has created the world’s fastest stretchable, wearable integrated circuits, an advance that could drive the Internet of Things and a much more connected, high-speed wireless world.

Led by Zhenqiang “Jack” Ma, the Lynn H. Matthias Professor in Engineering and Vilas Distinguished Achievement Professor in electrical and computer engineering at UW–Madison, the researchers published details of these powerful, highly efficient integrated circuits today, May 27, 2016, in the journal Advanced Functional Materials.

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May 28, 2016

Singer Simonne Jones Fuses Pop Music and Quantum Physics

Posted by in categories: media & arts, quantum physics

What I have come to appreciate with scientists and engineers is our diversity of interests and talents. And, this is definitely another case that proves that.


We talked to the artist about her debut album with songs called “Spooky Action” and “Gravity”.

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