Blog

Archive for the ‘climatology’ category

Jul 20, 2016

Physicists Say They’ve Figured out How Spacecraft Could Make It Through a Wormhole

Posted by in categories: climatology, cosmology, physics, space travel, sustainability

A new paper asserts that a physical body might be able to pass through a wormhole in spite of the extreme tidal forces that are at play.

A physical object, such as a person or a spacecraft, could theoretically make it through a wormhole in the centre of a black hole, and maybe even access another universe on the other side, physicists have suggested.

Continue reading “Physicists Say They’ve Figured out How Spacecraft Could Make It Through a Wormhole” »

Jul 6, 2016

Singularity Hypotheses

Posted by in categories: climatology, economics, education, health, policy, robotics/AI, singularity, sustainability

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies offer great promise for creating new and innovative products, growing the economy, and advancing national priorities in areas such as education, mental and physical health, addressing climate change, and more. Like any transformative technology, however, AI carries risks and presents complex policy challenges along a number of different fronts. The Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) is interested in developing a view of AI across all sectors for the purpose of recommending directions for research and determining challenges and opportunities in this field. The views of the American people, including stakeholders such as consumers, academic and industry researchers, private companies, and charitable foundations, are important to inform an understanding of current and future needs for AI in diverse fields. The purpose of this RFI is to solicit feedback on overarching questions in AI, including AI research and the tools, technologies, and training that are needed to answer these questions.

Jul 1, 2016

Half Of North America’s Electricity Will Be Emissions-Free By 2025

Posted by in categories: climatology, nuclear energy, sustainability

North american leaders set goals to mitigate climate change.

President Obama, Prime Minister Trudeau of Canada and President Peña Nieto of Mexico met in Ottawa on Wednesday, agreeing on goals and targets to lower emissions, raise efficiency and bring better protections to the environment.

Renewables, nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology will be on the table to help North Americans meet their goal of 50 percent clean, emissions-free energy by 2025.

Continue reading “Half Of North America’s Electricity Will Be Emissions-Free By 2025” »

Jul 1, 2016

Something To Celebrate: The Ozone Hole Is Really Healing

Posted by in category: climatology

Only volcanoes are being difficult about the ‘hole’ thing.

Jun 30, 2016

The sun is losing its spots — and here’s why that’s a bad thing for all of us

Posted by in category: climatology

The sun is losing its spots, and it’s certainly something that we shouldn’t take lightly. According to news.com.au, our fireball has gone blank for the second time this month, leading Meteorologist Paul Dorian to believe that the next solar minimum is approaching and there will be an increasing number of spotless days over the next few years. This matters because the amount of sun spots reportedly affects our climate.

So, let’s start with solar minimum. What is it exactly? Well, NASA explains it to be when the sun’s natural solar cycle shows the lowest amount of sunspots. You see, when at its best, the sun’s surface is covered in visible dark blemishes, or sunspots. The sun goes through a natural solar cycle approximately every 11 years, and each cycle is marked by the increase and decrease of sunspots – with the highest number of sunspots in any given solar cycle being the “solar maximum” and the lowest number being “solar minimum.”

The sun at its best.

Jun 29, 2016

End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries?

Posted by in categories: climatology, security

Nation states cause some of our biggest problems, from civil war to climate inaction. Science suggests there are better ways to run a planet.

By Debora MacKenzie

Try, for a moment, to envisage a world without countries. Imagine a map not divided into neat, coloured patches, each with clear borders, governments, laws. Try to describe anything our society does – trade, travel, science, sport, maintaining peace and security – without mentioning countries. Try to describe yourself: you have a right to at least one nationality, and the right to change it, but not the right to have none.

Continue reading “End of nations: Is there an alternative to countries?” »

Jun 16, 2016

Nanorods could harvest water in dry climates

Posted by in category: climatology

Sometimes it’s the accidental discoveries that make the biggest impact. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have learned that carbon-rich nanorods created in a botched experiment might be ideal for harvesting water. When there’s relatively low humidity (below 50 percent), the rods trap water inside their gaps; if it’s any more humid, however, they promptly expel that water as vapor. It’s a very unusual trait that’s likely caused by water condensing into a “bridge” in the nanorods, whose surface tension forces them to close and eventually kick the water out.

If scientists can refine the shape of these nanorods and get them to spray water on a consistent basis (only 10 to 20 percent do that right now), the implications are huge. They’d be ideal for harvesting and purifying water in dry climates — you could gather ambient moisture until there’s enough to drink. Alternately, you could use it for anti-sweat clothing that soaks up your perspiration and spits it outside. All told, you’d have direct control over just when and how you get water.

Jun 15, 2016

Turning CO2 Into Stone

Posted by in categories: climatology, sustainability

The latest weapon against climate change? Turning carbon dioxide into stone.

Jun 12, 2016

Nick Bostrom: ‘We are like small children playing with a bomb’

Posted by in categories: climatology, cybercrime/malcode, engineering, robotics/AI, sustainability

Some truth to this if the engineering team and designers are not reflective of the broader world population. Good example, is the super race research of the Nazis and attempts to make it happen. Today, AI in the hands of a N. Korea for example could be bad for the world. However, the larger threat that I see with AI is still the hacking of AI, and stolen AI by criminals to use against society.


Sentient machines are a greater threat to human existence than climate change, according to the Oxford philosopher Nick Bostrom.

Jun 6, 2016

A decade of deep thinking: Princeton Center for Theoretical Science celebrates 10 years

Posted by in categories: climatology, cosmology, quantum physics, science

The opportunity for intellectual freedom is what drew Anna Ijjas to the Princeton Center for Theoretical Science. As an associate research scholar, Ijjas studies basic questions about the universe’s origin and future. “PCTS provided an environment that encouraged me to question established paradigms and pursue unexplored possibilities,” said Ijjas, who is Princeton’s John A. Wheeler Postdoctoral Fellow in cosmology and astroparticle physics. “Independence and creativity are real values at the center.”

Those values were on display at a conference in May to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the center, which trains early-career researchers and provides a place where theoretical scientists — defined as those who use mathematics to study the natural world — can tackle the biggest questions in science, from the search for dark matter to global climate simulations to theories of quantum gravity.

“The range of topics presented at the [email protected] conference demonstrates that we’ve reached the goal we set 10 years ago, which is to develop a new breed of theorists with a much broader view of science than they would normally get from typical postdoctoral training,” said Paul Steinhardt, Princeton’s Albert Einstein Professor in Science and the center’s director since 2007.

Continue reading “A decade of deep thinking: Princeton Center for Theoretical Science celebrates 10 years” »

Page 1 of 71234567