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Archive for the ‘physics’ category

Feb 24, 2015

Why big Progress is virtually Thwarted

Posted by in category: physics

I have two examples to offer: c–global and cryodynamics.

c–global is based on overcoming an oversight Einstein had made in December of 1907. He assumed c to be reduced in proportion to his newly discovered gravitational redshift valid downstairs, while in reality an optically masked size increase occurs down there. The newly reconstituted c–global rules out cosmic expansion.

Cryodynamics is the new sister discipline to thermodynamics. It governs gases made up from mutually attractive particles. It explains the observed cosmological redshift without expansion.

Although both findings are in the literature for years, it is impossible to evoke any response. This despite the fact that cryodynamics promises limitless free energy. There is no support for its aficionados anywhere.

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Feb 1, 2015

How to Understand the Super Bowl—With Physics!

Posted by in categories: entertainment, physics

By  — Wired

New England Patriots quarterback Tom Brady throws a pass during a game against the Indianapolis Colts, Jan. 3, 2015.

The Super Bowl isn’t just a football game. It’s an opportunity to discuss physics. Let’s look at some of the interesting physics concepts that go with the game.

Deflategate and Ball Pressure

I don’t know about you, but I’m getting a little weary of the whole “deflategate” thing. In case you missed the controversy, it appears that some of the footballs in the playoff game between the Indianapolis Colts and the New England Patriots had below-acceptable inflation pressure. Now, it’s true that if you put a balloon outside on a cold day, the balloon deflates with the colder temperature. Could something like this have happened to the deflategate balls? The answer is: probably not. If you want more details, Chad Orzel has an excellent piece that looks at the physics of pressurized football. He shows experimentally that a ball in a 50°F football game wouldn’t drop 2 PSI due solely to the temperature change.

Read more

Jan 29, 2015

Dr. Ken Hayworth, Part 3: If we can build a brain, what is the future of I?

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, biotech/medical, entertainment, existential risks, futurism, neuroscience, particle physics, philosophy, physics, quantum physics, science, singularity

The study of consciousness and what makes us individuals is a topic filled with complexities. From a neuroscience perspective, consciousness is derived from a self-model as a unitary structure that shapes our perceptions, decisions and feelings. There is a tendency to jump to the conclusion with this model that mankind is being defined as self-absorbed and only being in it for ourselves in this life. Although that may be partially true, this definition of consciousness doesn’t necessarily address the role of morals and how that is shaped into our being. In the latest addition to The Galactic Public Archives, Dr. Ken Hayworth tackles the philosophical impact that technologies have on our lives.

Our previous two films feature Dr. Hayworth extrapolating about what radical new technologies in neuroscience could eventually produce. In a hypothetical world where mind upload is possible and we could create a perfect replica of ourselves, how would one personally identify? If this copy has the same memories and biological components, our method of understanding consciousness would inevitably shift. But when it comes down it, if we were put in a situation where it would be either you or the replica – it’s natural evolutionary instinct to want to save ourselves even if the other is an exact copy. This notion challenges the idea that our essence is defined by our life experiences because many different people can have identical experiences yet react differently.

Hayworth explains, that although there is an instinct for self-survival, humanity for the most part, has a basic understanding not to cause harm upon others. This is because morals are not being developed in the “hard drive” of your life experiences; instead our morals are tied to the very idea of someone just being a conscious and connected member of this world. Hayworth rationalizes that once we accept our flawed intuition of self, humanity will come to a spiritual understanding that the respect we give to others for simply possessing a reflection of the same kind of consciousness will be the key to us identifying our ultimate interconnectedness.

Continue reading “Dr. Ken Hayworth, Part 3: If we can build a brain, what is the future of I?” »


Jan 19, 2015

Bitcoins and Google Glass: Are They Heading For the Same Direction?

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, business, computing, cryptocurrencies, economics, engineering, entertainment, futurism, mobile phones, physics, robotics/AI, science

lifeboat-minFrom Innovation to Oblivion…

The ups and downs of Bitcoin as an internet currency may be compared to the eventual demise of Google Glass due to its lack of purpose among consumers. While it does not significantly hold true for bitcoins, which apparently have a more supportive and enthusiastic followers, the path that these two have taken and will take may be substantially similar than we like to admit.

For one, Bitcoin’s staggering price decline in the recent days left some people wondering what road it will eventually take in the near future. Is it only taking a detour or is it bound for a dead end?

In the case of Google Glass, it received much attention during its inception a few years ago. It was even named by Time magazine one of the best innovations of 2012. However, despite the ingenuity behind a supposed-to-be groundbreaking invention, Google Glass lacked a tangible sense, its purpose incoherent.

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Jan 14, 2015

The Eiffel Tower Experiment

Posted by in category: physics

You need a pocket mirror, a laser pointer and a counter. Then measure both the up-down time (or distance) and the down-up time (or distance). The two are different.

This means, taking light-radar as a reliable measuring device, that the two measured heights are different. As far as I know, the experiment has never been done in spite of its simplicity.

Why is it worth doing? This “V-Lambda” experiment can also be called “WM” experiment, with the two letters printed on top of each other. You then get XXXX. Very regularly, no shifts. That is, upper and lower time intervals interlock even though being different.

You can do the same experiment between earth and a neutron star (provided a mirror can be deposited on its surface). Then the two time intervals that interlock differ by a factor of about 2.

Continue reading “The Eiffel Tower Experiment” »


Jan 7, 2015

GM Overcoming Toyota & Ford Surmounting Honda, Unfailingly, For Life! By Mr. Andres Agostini

Posted by in categories: business, complex systems, driverless cars, economics, education, energy, engineering, finance, futurism, hardware, innovation, military, physics, science, singularity, strategy

GM Overcoming Toyota & Ford Surmounting Honda, Unfailingly, For Life!

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FIRST

The reason why Japanese automotive industry beat the U.S. car-makers is because, to them, it is an outright existential world to win and in the process spread a sense of Japanese exceptionalism.

They are fighting a most-lucrative World War merciless!

Continue reading “GM Overcoming Toyota & Ford Surmounting Honda, Unfailingly, For Life! By Mr. Andres Agostini” »


Jan 7, 2015

CROSS-FUNCTIONAL AWAKEN, YET CONDITIONALIZED CONSCIOUSNESS AS PER NON-GIRLIE U.S. HARD ROCKET SCIENTISTS! By Mr. Andres Agostini

Posted by in categories: business, complex systems, defense, disruptive technology, economics, education, engineering, ethics, existential risks, finance, futurism, innovation, physics, science, security, strategy

CROSS-FUNCTIONAL AWAKEN, YET CONDITIONALIZED CONSCIOUSNESS AS PER NON-GIRLIE U.S. HARD ROCKET SCIENTISTS!

0000  GIRLY SUPER OVERMAN

(Excerpted from the White Swan Book)

Sequential and Progressive Tidbits as Follows:

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Jan 6, 2015

SIMPLICITY DEATH! By Mr. Andres Agostini

Posted by in categories: business, complex systems, computing, counterterrorism, defense, disruptive technology, economics, education, engineering, existential risks, futurism, geopolitics, governance, innovation, physics, science, security, singularity, strategy

SIMPLICITY DEATH! By Mr. Andres Agostini

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(PLEASE PAY ATTENTION TO THIS SUBJECT MATTER AS IT WOULD BE AMPLIFIED IN FUTURE NEW ARTICLES UNDER THE SAME TITLE).

I will give you some considerations excerpted from the White Swan book ( ASIN: B00KMY0DLK ) to show that Simplicity, via Technological, Social, Political, Geopolitical, and Economic Changes, is OUTRIGHT OBSOLETE and there is now ONLY: COMPLEXITY AND THE POWER OF COMPLEXITY.

THEREFORE:

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Jan 5, 2015

Lockheed Martin’s SkunkWorks!

Posted by in categories: big data, business, complex systems, economics, education, engineering, ethics, existential risks, futurism, information science, innovation, physics, science, security, strategy

I have admired Lockheed Martin’s SkunkWorks for a long, long time.

00000000000000000000000000   SKUNK

FORTUNATELY AND TO THIS PURPOSE, A LOCKHEED MARTIN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCHER AND ENGINEER WROTE:

” … Many businesses think today’s world is complicated and with technology rapidly changing, trying to figure out all the correct things to do is impossible, that it is better to just do what can be done, and adjust things when the result happens to be what is not expected. This is simply gambling where the odds for success and the liability of failure are getting worse by the day. The truth is the world is not complicated, just complex, and with complexity increasing at the same time technology is rapidly changing, the combination of the two conditions only seems complicated. The difference between complexity and complication is complexity can be logically addressed and accounted for such that proper risk management can then be applied and when the quality of the technology is assured early in the planning, analysis and design of the technical solution instead of only assuring it late in the development cycle, the integrated combination of these two scientifically validated methodologies can be used to reliably predict the expected outcomes. There is nobody better at applying the integrated combination of risk management and quality assurance than Mr. Andres Agostini or is there anybody that has more real world experience in doing so, and this includes solving some of the most wicked problems of some of the largest businesses throughout the world. If you are just gambling things work out, then I highly recommend you stop doing business dangerously and seek the assistance of Andres, the master of risk management and quality assurance, as well as reliability and continuous process improvement …”

ABSOLUTE END.

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Jan 5, 2015

MANDATE: Thou Shalt Sin In Favor Of Explosively-Nonlinear Victory For Eternity!, Stupid? By Mr. Andres Agostini — Amazon — LinkedIn — Lifeboat Foundation

Posted by in categories: business, complex systems, disruptive technology, economics, education, engineering, existential risks, futurism, governance, life extension, physics, science, singularity

MANDATE: Thou Shalt Sin In Favor Of Explosively-Nonlinear Victory For Eternity!

BRUSH 400

ERGO:

Thou Shalt Sin Against Linear Failure, In Order To Embrace Explosively-Nonlinear Victory For Eternity!

What to do against the item below?

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