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Archive for the ‘electronics’ category

Mar 20, 2017

These new electronic glasses allow the legally blind to see

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, electronics

Toronto-based eSight Corp. has launched a pair of electronic glasses that allow the legally blind to see. The eSight3 glasses use high-tech image processing to give those who are legally blind the chance to experience what it is like to have 20/20 vision.

Users can control a variety of functions that are important for vision, including magnification, contrast, brightness and focus. Videos projected onto two OLED screens in front of the eyes allow the user to see the different functions in action.

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Mar 9, 2017

Liquid Light: Scientists Unite Light and Electricity to Make Electronics Smaller and Faster

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

In Brief Researchers have found a way to bridge the gap between light and electricity—the two main components of current data transmission. Using the liquid light produced by polaritons, they were able to unite the two, a development that would lead to faster data transmission.

As we reach the smallest units known to physics, it’s becoming more apparent than ever: Moore’s Law can’t hold strong forever. But although it seems we are exhausting the extent to which we can miniaturize processors (as far as we know now), it seems Moore’s Law won’t be scrapped for good…at least not entirely.

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Mar 1, 2017

The curious case of cockroach magnetization

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, electronics

The discovery that living and dead cockroaches have strikingly different magnetic properties could help bioengineers design new magnetic sensors.

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Feb 23, 2017

Creating integrated circuits just atoms thick

Posted by in categories: electronics, particle physics

A new technique using liquid metals to create integrated circuits that are just atoms thick could lead to the next big advance for electronics.

The process opens the way for the production of large wafers around 1.5 nanometres in depth (a sheet of paper, by comparison, is 100,000nm thick).

Other techniques have proven unreliable in terms of quality, difficult to scale up and function only at very high temperatures — 550 degrees or more.

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Feb 16, 2017

Inkjet-printable stretchy circuits could lead to huge e-wallpaper screens

Posted by in categories: electronics, health

When and if that hurdle is overcome, the researchers say that the easily-fabricated stretchy technology could begin to find commercial applications, in devices like rubbery wrist-worn health trackers, deformable tablets and electronic wallpaper that can make huge screens out of entire walls.

“We have created a new technology that is not yet available,” says Wang. “And we have taken it one big step beyond the flexible screens that are about to become commercially available.”

The research was published in the journal ACS Nano.

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Feb 10, 2017

Nan Goldin: Photography Is “a Chance to Touch Someone with a Camera”

Posted by in categories: electronics, transhumanism

Some small write-ups out today on the NY Times piece coverig transhumanism, including in The Paris Review, a well known literary publication for writing folks out there: https://www.theparisreview.org/blog/2017/02/09/touch-someone…ther-news/ &

http://transhumanist-party.org/2017/02/10/nyt-magazine-zoltan/ &

“Dying is totally mainstream.”

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Feb 8, 2017

New Project Looks to Turn a Bandage into an mHealth Sensor

Posted by in category: electronics

I do luv this.


New porject looks to turn a bandage into an mHealth sensor for PAD treatment.

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Feb 8, 2017

Research details developments in the mid ir sensors market

Posted by in category: electronics

Nice.


Orbis Research Present’s Mid IR Sensors Market Shares, Strategies, and Forecasts, Worldwide to 2022 enhances the decision making capabilities and helps to create an effective counter strategies to gain competitive advantage. Report explores the Key Players, Industry Overview, Supply and Consumption Analysis to 2022.

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Feb 6, 2017

Gordon Research Conferences

Posted by in categories: electronics, quantum physics

Another interesting conference on Quantum sensors and hosted in China. Definitely looks intriguing.

Quantum sensing is a new quantum technology that utilizes quantum coherence for ultrasensitive detection.


Applications for this meeting must be submitted by June 4, 2017. Please apply early, as some meetings become oversubscribed (full) before this deadline. If the meeting is oversubscribed, it will be stated here. Note: Applications for oversubscribed meetings will only be considered by the Conference Chair if more seats become available due to cancellations.

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Feb 5, 2017

This New Liquid Crystal Can Triple the Sharpness of Tv and Computer Screens

Posted by in categories: computing, electronics

Scientists have invented a new type of liquid crystal that allows tv and computer manufacturers to pack three times as many pixels into the same area of screen, while reducing the amount of power required to run the device.

This new type of blue-phase liquid crystal is so effective because it bypasses the colour filters used in current screen technology. This change alone reduces the amount of energy lost during light transmission by more than 40 percent.

“Today’s Apple Retina displays have a resolution density of about 500 pixels per inch,” says one of the team, physicist Shin-Tson Wu from University of Central Florida.

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