Blog

Archive for the ‘nuclear energy’ category

Feb 6, 2016

Morocco Turns on What will Become the World’s Largest Solar Power Plant

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, solar power, sustainability

As oil was to Saudi Arabia, could solar be to Morocco?


Morocco has turned on its enormous solar power plant in the town of Ourrzazate, on the edge of the Saharan desert. The plant already spans thousands of acres and is proficient of generating up to 160 megawatts of power. It’s already one of the largest solar power grids in the world, capable of being seen from space. And it’s only going to get bigger.

The present grid, called Noor I, is just the first phase of a planned project to bring renewable energy to millions living in Morocco. It will soon be followed by expansions, Noor II and Noor III, that will add even more mirrors to the present plant. Once the project is finished around 2018, the whole grid will cover 6,000 acres. It will be capable of producing up to 580 megawatts of power, comparable to that of a small nuclear reactor.

Continue reading “Morocco Turns on What will Become the World’s Largest Solar Power Plant” »

Feb 3, 2016

Germany is getting closer to nuclear fusion—the long-held dream of unlimited clean energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

German scientists today will set about the first steps towards what has become the Holy Grail of energy—nuclear fusion, which has the potential for unlimited amounts of clean power. There are a number of challenges to harnessing this power —researchers need to build a device that can heat atoms to temperatures of more than 100 million °C (180 million °F).

After almost nine years of construction work and more than a million assembly hours, researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Greifswald are set to do just that by heating a tiny amount of hydrogen until it becomes as hot, hopefully, as the center of the Sun.

Researchers are keen to tap into the incredible amount of energy released when atoms join together at extremely high temperatures in the super-hot gas known as plasma. Today’s test will not produce any energy, just the plasma—a different state of matter created at extremely high temperatures. German chancellor Angela Merkel, who has a doctorate in physics, will reportedly attend.

Read more

Feb 3, 2016

Scientists in Germany Take a Major Step Towards Nuclear Fusion

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

Excellent news!


Physicists in Germany have used an experimental nuclear fusion device to produce hydrogen plasma in a process similar to what happens on the Sun. The test marks an important milestone on the road towards this super-futuristic source of cheap and clean nuclear energy.

Earlier today in an event attended by German Chancellor Angela Merkel (herself a PhD physicist), researchers from the Max Planck Institute in Greifswald turned on the Wendelstein 7-X stellarator, an experimental nuclear fusion reactor. (Actually, the researchers let Merkel do the honors.) This €400 million ($435 million) stellarator is being used by physicists to test the technical viability of a future fusion reactor.

Continue reading “Scientists in Germany Take a Major Step Towards Nuclear Fusion” »

Feb 3, 2016

Scientists are poised to flip the switch on an experiment that could help provide the world with a clean and almost unlimited source of energy

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

GREIFSWALD, Germany (AP) — Scientists are poised to flip the switch on an experiment that could take them a step closer to the goal of generating clean and cheap nuclear power.

Read more

Dec 11, 2015

German plasma success raises nuclear fusion hopes

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, particle physics

A German nuclear fusion experiment has produced a special super-hot gas which scientists hope will eventually lead to clean, cheap energy.

The helium plasma — a cloud of loose, charged particles — lasted just a tenth of a second and was about one million degrees Celsius.

It was hailed as a breakthrough for the Max Planck Institute’s stellarator — a chamber whose design differs from the tokamak fusion devices used elsewhere.

Read more

Dec 10, 2015

Germany just fired up a monster machine that could revolutionize the way we use energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, physics

On Thursday, the Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics fired up a monster machine that it hopes will change the world.

The machine is called the Wendelstein 7-X, or W7-X for short. It’s a type of nuclear-fusion machine called a stellarator and is the largest, most sophisticated of its kind.

Continue reading “Germany just fired up a monster machine that could revolutionize the way we use energy” »

Dec 10, 2015

The first plasma: the Wendelstein 7-X fusion device is now in operation

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Start of operation and first plasma in the Wendelstein 7-X fusion research device at IPP Greifswald.

Read more

Dec 8, 2015

Why Algae Could Be the Greatest—and Trickiest—Fuel Source of All

Posted by in categories: climatology, nuclear energy, sustainability

I recall when Venter made the first synthetic unique life form he said biofuels and algae that soaks up carbon dioxide would come out of it. Feels like it has been slow going but here is a why and why no item and please read the comments too as they are also informative.


From powering airplanes to replacing nuclear energy, algae has been touted as a green energy miracle. So if our waterways are already filled with the stuff, why isn’t it filling the world’s skies with biofueled planes? Algae is a tricky creature that presents a lot of challenges and misconceptions. Here’s why it’s difficult to harness—and why it could big a big payoff.

As we previously reported, algae is a fuel source that’s vastly more eco-friendly than oil, and will be crucial as we head into a future filled with climate change and depleting fossil fuels.

Continue reading “Why Algae Could Be the Greatest—and Trickiest—Fuel Source of All” »

Nov 30, 2015

NASA — The Fusion Driven Rocket: Nuclear Propulsion through Direct Conversion of Fusion Energy

Posted by in categories: nuclear energy, space

Space Technology Mission Directorate, STMD

Read more

Nov 25, 2015

Stephen Hawking’s Legacy Could Be ‘Holy Grail’ Of Physics: Combining Gravity And Quantum Mechanics At Black Hole Horizons

Posted by in categories: cosmology, neuroscience, nuclear energy, particle physics, quantum physics, sustainability

Interesting…


To suggest that quantum mechanics and gravity are on the verge of being reconciled would be, to the physics world at least, as significant as the discover of splitting the atom. While splitting the atom might have led to the nuclear bomb, it also led to the technology of nuclear power, i.e. nuclear fission, which, if harnessed properly, creates a renewable and sustainable energy resource. The problem has always been that quantum mechanics — the rules that govern sub-atomic particles — and gravity, the rule that governs mass as we know it (the stuff we can touch and feel), do not agree with each other. The question has always been, what is it that “unifies” these two theories? Is quantum mechanics God playing dice, as Einstein suggested?

“God doesn’t play dice with the universe.”

Continue reading “Stephen Hawking’s Legacy Could Be ‘Holy Grail’ Of Physics: Combining Gravity And Quantum Mechanics At Black Hole Horizons” »

Page 1 of 512345