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Archive for the ‘cosmology’ category

Feb 23, 2017

A Potential Dark Matter Signature Has Been Seen in The Andromeda Galaxy

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

NASA’s Fermi Telescope has looked at the gamma-ray emission of M31, the Andromeda Galaxy, and discovered the largest fraction of this powerful radiation comes from the core of the galaxy, very much like in our own Milky Way. The international team of researchers has considered this signature as potential indirect evidence of dark matter.

Some theoretical models predict gamma-ray emissions when dark matter particles interact with each other. Dark matter doesn’t like interacting at all, it doesn’t form clumps or clouds, so these gamma-ray signals might only happen in dense regions, like at the core of galaxies.

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Feb 20, 2017

Scientists might be just weeks away from taking the first real picture of a black hole

Posted by in category: cosmology

Twenty years after the project began, scientists think they are now just weeks away from receiving their first picture of a black hole.

The numbers behind the creation of the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) are mind boggling enough, let alone the thought of what it might see on April 5 when it’s trained on Sagittarius A*, the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy.

It’s 26,000 light years from Earth. Even though its “edge” is 20-odd million kilometres across, EHT team members say seeing it is still like trying to pinpoint a grapefruit on the Moon.

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Feb 16, 2017

Scientists Are About to Switch on a Telescope That Could Photograph a Black Hole’s Event Horizon

Posted by in category: cosmology

Black holes are among the most fascinating objects in the known Universe. But despite the fact that they’re suspected to lurk at the centre of most galaxies, the reality is that no one has ever been able to actually photograph one.

That’s because black holes, as their name implies, are very, very dark. They’re so massive that they irreversibly consume everything that crosses their event horizon, including light, making them impossible to photograph. But that could be about to change, when a new telescope network switches on in April this year.

Called the Event Horizon Telescope, the new device is made up of a network of radio receivers located across the planet, including at the South Pole, in the US, Chile, and the French alps.

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Feb 14, 2017

Brand New Maths Could Finally Explain How Disturbances Propagate Through Space-Time

Posted by in categories: cosmology, mathematics, physics

The Universe as we know it is made up of a continuum of space and time — a space-time fabric that’s curved by massive objects such as stars and black holes, and which dictates the movement of matter.

Thanks to Einstein’s gravitational waves, we know disturbances can propagate through both space and time. But what’s less understood is exactly how that happens when properties of the fabric is continuously shifting.

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Feb 14, 2017

EmDrive: UK scientist claims ‘new physics’ explains galaxy rotation and theoretical space propulsion

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics, space travel

Dr Mike McCulloch says his theory explains why galaxies are not ripped apart, without needing dark matter.

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Feb 13, 2017

Creating computers that use 10,000 times less energy

Posted by in categories: computing, cosmology, mobile phones, sustainability

Quest to settle riddle over Einstein’s dark energy theory may soon be over

Saving energy is just as important as finding new and sustainable sources. By reducing the demand we reduce the energy and storage needed in the first place.

This is a first step in creating the tools needed to design and engineer low energy electronics. Cell Phones that last for weeks on a single charge and computers and servers using micro watts. However you will still need a lot of energy to drive screens and interface devices.

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Feb 5, 2017

Study reveals substantial evidence of holographic universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, holograms, physics

Theoretical physicists and astrophysicists, investigating irregularities in the cosmic microwave background (the ‘afterglow’ of the Big Bang), have found that there is substantial evidence of our universe being a vast and complex hologram. A UK, Canadian and Italian study has provided what researchers believe is the first observational evidence supporting a holographic explanation of the universe. The researchers from the University of Southampton (UK), University of Waterloo (Canada), Perimeter Institute (Canada), INFN, Lecce (Italy) and the University of Salento (Italy) have published their findings in the journal Physical Review Letters.

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Feb 4, 2017

What Was Our Universe Like Before the Big Bang?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, physics

Theoretical physicists and cosmologists deal with the biggest questions, like “Why are we here?” “When did the universe begin?” and “How?” Another questions that bugs them, and likely has bugged you, is “What happened before the Big Bang?”

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Feb 2, 2017

Scientists begin building supercomputer programmed to solve ultimate question of life

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Oh, there will be many things come together for all of us when we begin further expanding and advancing our work on quantum especially in our work with Quantum parallel states, as well as the work on both AI and Synbio on QC. Next 3 to 5 yrs are truly going to change a lot of things in science and technology.


British scientists have taken the first step towards building a real-life version of Deep Thought, the supercomputer programmed to solve the “ultimate question of life, the universe, and everything” in Douglas Adams’s The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy. The team has drawn up the first blueprint for a giant quantum computer, a device capable of rapidly solving problems that would take an ordinary computer billions of years to answer.

The ground-breaking modular design could theoretically pave the way to a machine as large as a football field with undreamed of levels of computing power.

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Feb 1, 2017

Entire universe could be a hologram, study suggests

Posted by in categories: cosmology, holograms, quantum physics

As strange as it may sound, the universe actually may be a hologram, according to a recent study published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Despite our knowledge of the universe, cosmologists have never been able to agree on a single unified model. This is because many current versions describe the cosmos with either general relativity or quantum theory, and neither of those work well together.

In an attempt to bridge this gap, a team of researchers from Canada, England, and the United States, argued that a holographic explanation of the universe could provide a set model, UPI reports. This is because it is able to account for irregularities in the echo of thermal energy leftover from the Big Bang, known as the cosmic microwave background.

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