Blog

Archive for the ‘cosmology’ category

May 25, 2016

Hunting for dark matter’s ‘Hidden Valley’

Posted by in categories: cosmology, education, physics

Kathryn Zurek realized a decade ago that we may be searching in the wrong places for clues to one of the universe’s greatest unsolved mysteries: dark matter. Despite making up an estimated 85 percent of the total mass of the universe, we haven’t yet figured out what it’s made of.

Now, Zurek, a theoretical physicist at the Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), says thanks to extraordinary improvements in experimental sensitivity, “We increasingly know where not to look.” In 2006, during grad school, Zurek began to explore the concept of a new “Hidden Valley” model for physics that could hold all of the answers to .

“I noticed that from a model-builder’s point of view that dark matter was extraordinarily undeveloped,” she said. It seemed as though scientists were figuratively hunting in the dark for answers. “People were focused on models of just two classes of , rather than a much broader array of possibilities.”

May 24, 2016

Scientist suggests possible link between primordial black holes and dark matter

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

Dark matter is a mysterious substance composing most of the material universe, now widely thought to be some form of massive exotic particle. An intriguing alternative view is that dark matter is made of black holes formed during the first second of our universe’s existence, known as primordial black holes. Now a scientist at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, suggests that this interpretation aligns with our knowledge of cosmic infrared and X-ray background glows and may explain the unexpectedly high masses of merging black holes detected last year.

“This study is an effort to bring together a broad set of ideas and observations to test how well they fit, and the fit is surprisingly good,” said Alexander Kashlinsky, an astrophysicist at NASA Goddard. “If this is correct, then all galaxies, including our own, are embedded within a vast sphere of black holes each about 30 times the sun’s mass.”

In 2005, Kashlinsky led a team of astronomers using NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope to explore the background glow of infrared light in one part of the sky. The researchers reported excessive patchiness in the glow and concluded it was likely caused by the aggregate light of the first sources to illuminate the universe more than 13 billion years ago. Follow-up studies confirmed that this cosmic infrared background (CIB) showed similar unexpected structure in other parts of the sky.

May 24, 2016

Where Is New Physics Hiding, And How Can We Find It?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

The Standard Models of particle physics and cosmology don’t add up to all there is. What might be the next giant leap forward?

May 23, 2016

Dark Matter + Black Hole = Wormhole?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, futurism

Share tweet motherboard motherboard watch sections machines discoveries space futures gaming earth?trk_source=nav”

May 23, 2016

Viewpoint: An Arrested Implosion

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics, quantum physics

The collapse of a trapped ultracold magnetic gas is arrested by quantum fluctuations, creating quantum droplets of superfluid atoms.

Macroscopic implosions of quantum matter waves have now been halted by quantum fluctuations. The quantum wave in question is an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), a quantum state with thousands to tens of millions of atoms in an ultracold gas all sharing the same macroscopic wave function. Attractive atomic interactions can cause BECs to collapse in spectacular ways, in what’s been termed a “bosenova,” a lighthearted allusion to a supernova explosion [1]. Tilman Pfau and colleagues from the University of Stuttgart, Germany, have shown that for BECs made of dysprosium, whose bosonic isotopes are among the most magnetic atoms in the periodic table, long-range dipole-dipole interactions between these neutral atoms create a totally new phenomenon: the arrested collapse of a quantum magnetic fluid, called a quantum ferrofluid [2, 3]. Such a ferrofluid relies crucially on the strong dipolar interactions in the dysprosium gas.

May 20, 2016

Here’s your chance to help astronomers solve “one of the biggest mysteries of all time”

Posted by in category: cosmology

A team of astronomers investigating “the most mysterious star in our galaxy” have launched a Kickstarter campaign, with hopes to raise $100,000 to find out “Where’s the Flux?”

May 17, 2016

What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists?

Posted by in categories: cosmology, particle physics

Whether these Universes are similar or different to our own, whether they have the same physical laws and properties, whether they have the same fundamental constants, particles and interactions, we do not know.

And at the same time, our very best laws of nature tell us that this is reality: we are a tiny fraction of our observable Universe, which is a tiny bit of the unobservable Universe, which is just one of a tremendous number of Universes in a multiverse that’s constantly generating new ones, and has been for billions of years. And that’s the Multiverse we live in, to the best of our knowledge!

Continue reading “What is the Multiverse, and why do we think it exists?” »

May 16, 2016

The Big Bang is not the beginning of our universe — it’s actually the end of something else entirely

Posted by in category: cosmology

Caltech theoretical physicist Sean Carroll explores what existed before the Big Bang in his new book, “The Big Picture.”

Produced by Delano Samuels and Jessica Orwig

Continue reading “The Big Bang is not the beginning of our universe — it’s actually the end of something else entirely” »

May 13, 2016

Could A New Type Of Supernova Eliminate Dark Energy?

Posted by in category: cosmology

The surprising faintness of these distant “standard candles” showed us an accelerating, dark energy Universe. Could there be a different explanation?

May 11, 2016

Stephen Hawking says Black Holes could be portals to another Universe

Posted by in categories: cosmology, law enforcement

According to statements from renowned astrophysicist Stephen Hawking, Black Holes are not the cosmic prisons we thought they were, and could actually be portals to another universe.

the-original-interstellar-ending-was-darker-less-confusing-476381-2

During a lecture at Harvard’s Sanders Theater, renowned physicist Stephen Hawking helped about Black Holes during an event which marked the inauguration of Harvard’s Black Hole Initiative wich aims to join numerous scientists and focus scientifically on Black Hole Research.

Continue reading “Stephen Hawking says Black Holes could be portals to another Universe” »

Page 1 of 2212345678Last