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Aug 15, 2012

Approaching the Great Rescue

Posted by in categories: biological, biotech/medical, business, chemistry, complex systems, education, engineering, ethics, events, evolution, existential risks, futurism, geopolitics, homo sapiens, human trajectories, life extension, media & arts, neuroscience, philosophy, policy, singularity, sustainability, transparency

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120815131137.htm

One more step has been taken toward making whole body cryopreservation a practical reality. An understanding of the properties of water allows the temperature of the human body to be lowered without damaging cell structures.

Just as the microchip revolution was unforeseen the societal effects of suspending death have been overlooked completely.

The first successful procedure to freeze a human being and then revive that person without damage at a later date will be the most important single event in human history. When that person is revived he or she will awaken to a completely different world.

It will be a mad rush to build storage facilities for the critically ill so their lives can be saved. The very old and those in the terminal stages of disease will be rescued from imminent death. Vast resources will be turned toward the life sciences as the race to repair the effects of old age and cure disease begins. Hundreds of millions may eventually be awakened once aging is reversed. Life will become far more valuable overnight and activities such as automobile and air travel will be viewed in a new light. War will end because no one will desire to hasten the death of another human being.

It will not be immortality, just parole from the death row we all share. Get ready.

2

Comments — comments are now closed.

  • Steve Wilson on August 15, 2012 4:41 pm

    This seems like a wildly optimistic vision of a global response to successful cryopreservation in terms of both speed and scale. Why would there be a mad rush to preserve or cure the world when millions are allowed to die each year now from easily treated diseases? Preservation will begin as the domain of the wealthy and the fortunate, as with today’s best healthcare.

  • GaryChurch on August 15, 2012 4:51 pm

    Millions are allowed to die because we are all going to die anyway– that is the excuse anyway.

    It may seem wildly optimistic to some. “Preservation” will not begin as the domain of the wealthy– it will begin as a basic human right for everyone. There is nothing intrinsically expensive about freezing someone and putting them in storage. The outrage over any such attempts at restricting the procedure would be.….…..unbelievable.
    Thanks for the comment.