Bitcoin Endowment Fund Details

ANONCOIN
Lifeboat Foundation Bought Anoncoins11,548.52848689
Total Value (Anoncoins)11,548.52848689

BITCOIN
Lifeboat Foundation Mined Bitcoins6.74405782
+ Donations Applied255.7569792
+ Anonymous Donations4.87323691
+ Anonymous Commitments Outstanding0.00
+ Commitments Outstanding363.69537601
- Bitcoins Spent47.0476
Total Value (Bitcoins)584.02204994

CRYPTOGENICBULLION
Donations2.144172
+ Anonymous Donations0
Total Value (CryptoGenicBullion)2.144172

DARKCOIN
Lifeboat Foundation Bought Darkcoins451.434
Total Value (Darkcoins)451.434

LITECOIN
Donations13.14159265
+ Anonymous Donations.01
Total Value (Litecoins)13.15159265

MONERO
Donations100
+ Anonymous Donations100
Total Value (Noblecoins)100

NOBLECOIN
Donations150,000
+ Anonymous Donations115,999.80
Total Value (Noblecoins)265,999.80

PEERCOIN
Donations30
+ Anonymous Donations.825038
Total Value (Peercoins)30.825038

SOLARCOIN
Donations1,025
+ Anonymous Donations125
Total Value (Solarcoins)1,150

Total Value in U.S. Dollars

$690,511.67

Expenses covered by bitcoin donations:
  • Feb 23, 2013 – .036 BTC: Fee for transferring bitcoins to more secure wallet.
  • Sep 25, 2013 – .01 BTC: Donated to the Bitcoin wiki which enabled us to post about relevant bitcoin projects.
  • Jan 2, 2014 – .0003 BTC: Fee for transferring bitcoins to different wallet.
  • Jan 17, 2014 – 2.0101 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jan 28, 2014 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Feb 7, 2014 – 1.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Mar 20, 2014 – 1.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Apr 1, 2014 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Apr 28, 2014 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • May 22, 2014 – 1.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converted to 52.244 darkcoins.
  • May 22, 2014 – 10.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converted to 399.19 darkcoins.
  • May 23, 2014 – 10.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converted to 4,559.01537223 anoncoins.
  • May 30, 2014 – 5.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converted to 2,796.04640105 anoncoins.
  • Jun 29, 2014 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jul 16, 2014 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jul 20, 2014 – 5.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converted to 4,193.46671361 anoncoins.
  • Jul 30, 2014 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Aug 14, 2014 – 1.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Aug 26, 2014 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Sep 26, 2014 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Oct 29, 2014 – 9.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Dec 21, 2014 – 5.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jan 23, 2015 – 8.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Feb 26, 2015 – 6.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Mar 24, 2015 – 9.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • May 28, 2015 – 6.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jul 1, 2015 – 5.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jul 31, 2015 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Aug 13, 2015 – 7.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Sep 1, 2015 – 6.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Sep 28, 2015 – 6.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Oct 20, 2015 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Oct 28, 2015 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Nov 2, 2015 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Dec 2, 2015 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Dec 18, 2015 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Dec 29, 2015 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jan 26, 2016 – 1.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Feb 2, 2016 – 4.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Feb 4, 2016 – 4.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jul 6, 2016 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Nov 2, 2016 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Nov 26, 2016 – 2.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Jan 16, 2017 – 4.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
  • Feb 2, 2017 – 3.0001 BTC: Diversifying endowment fund, converting to dollars.
Expenses covered by nonbitcoin donations:
  • Apr 1, 2011 – $1,874.40: HP Pavilion Elite HPE-570t with 2GB DDR3 ATI Radeon HD 5570 was used for all mining. The primary goal of this machine was for other Lifeboat functions so none of its price will be charged to our Bitcoin Endowment Fund. (This otherwise monster machine had a fairly small graphics card.)
  • Mar 29, 2013 – $299.99: Gigabyte AMD Radeon HD 7950 3GB GDDR5 DVI-I/HDMI/2x Mini-Displayport PCI-Express Graphic Card (Eventually returned for a replacement because we couldn't get it to work.)
  • Apr 2, 2013 – $151.79: Computer Guy (Attempted to get Gigabyte card to work plus emergency replacement of power supply.)
  • Apr 2, 2013 – $0.00: Gigabyte AMD Radeon HD 7950 3GB GDDR5 DVI-I/HDMI/2x Mini-Displayport PCI-Express Graphic Card (Eventually returned for a refund of the $299.99 price of the first card ordered because we couldn't get it to work and we then gave up on this brand.)
  • Apr 3, 2013 – $25.90: 2 of StarTech.com PCIEXSPLIT6 6-Inch PCI Express Power Splitter Cable; 1 of StarTech.com 6-Inch LP4 to 6 Pin PCI Express Video Card Power Cable Adapter; 1 of StarTech PCI Express 6 pin to 8 pin Power Adapter Cable
  • Apr 3, 2013 – $8.15: 1 of StarTech.com 6-Inch LP4 to 8 Pin PCI Express Video Card Power Cable Adapter
  • Apr 8, 2013 – $314.40: Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 3GB DDR5 HDMI / DVI-I / Dual Mini DP with Boost PCI-Express Graphics Card (And it worked on the first try!)
  • Apr 8, 2013 – $199.99: VisionTek Radeon 7850 2GB DDR5 PCI Express Graphics Card (Ended up being useful in debugging oclvanitygen bugs.)
  • Apr 8, 2013 – $5.45: 1 of StarTech 6in 4 Pin to 8 Pin EPS Power Adapter with LP4 - F/M
  • Apr 8, 2013 – $89.99: Corsair CX750 Builder Series ATX 80 PLUS Bronze Certified Power Supply (You really want a monster supply like this to run a HD 7950 card because of the high amperage needs of such a card. The HD 7950 uses at most 150 watts but needs about 25 amperage on its 12 volt rail.)
  • Apr 13, 2013 – $149.99: Corsair Professional Series AX 750 Watt ATX/EPS Modular 80 PLUS Gold (Modular setup meant no unnecessary cables and therefore better airflow in the mini-sized tower that was being used. This is also a more efficient model than the last power supply so it generates less excess heat. The other Corsair is now a backup power supply. And none of the various adapter cables are now being used but are stored for future scenarios.)
  • Jul 31, 2013 – $419.99: EVGA GeForce GTX770 SuperClocked with EVGA ACX Cooler 2GB GDDR5 256bit was ordered so we could switch from AMD to NVIDIA to work around oclvanitygen bugs that cause high-end AMD cards to run at one quarter their potential speed. Unfortunately this card was incompatible with our HP Pavilion Elite HPE-570t so we returned it and ordered an ASUS graphics card since the HP had a Pegatron motherboard and Pegatron was part of ASUS at the time that the HP was manufactured.
  • Aug 16, 2013 – $409.99 ASUS GTX770-DC2OC-2GD5 GeForce GTX770 2GB GDDR5 256-bit, DVI-I/DVI-D/ HDMI/DP PCI-Express 3.0 SLI ready Graphic Card OC-selected 1110MHz core. This card was also incompatible with our HP Pavilion Elite HPE-570t so we worked to get a low-end computer to handle it since it was looking pretty hopeless to get a GTX770 running in the HP.
  • Aug 30, 2013 – $120.00 for a Dell GX620. This computer only had room for a 1-slot graphics card so it was returned. (This was bought from a local dealer.)
  • Aug 31, 2013 – $250.00 for a HP xw400 workstation. (If you are wondering how we could find a workstation for only $250, the answer is that the workstation which was originally priced at $3,400 is a bit old.) This was bought from the same dealer that provided the Dell GX620. This workstation can handle up to a 5-slot graphics card (such a card doesn't yet exist) and handled the ASUS card fine. Note that EVGA has better techsupport than ASUS and their card seemed a bit sturdier (bigger heat sink) as well but it wasn't worth it to return the ASUS card to get the EVGA card back. There is always a possibility that the HP xw400 workstation would be incompatible with the EVGA card…
     
    It is worth noting that a bunch of adapter cables that were bought previously are now being used with the HP xw400 workstation as its power supply only had one 6-pin PCI-E power cable, and the EVGA card needs one 6-pin and one 8-pin PCI-E power cable. Amazingly, testing so far shows that the power supply in this old computer is powerful enough to handle the ASUS card after the adapter cables were attached to it. If it wasn't powerful enough then we would have used our Corsair CX750 power supply which was purchased earlier.
  • Sep 2, 2013 – $25.89 for an ARCTIC F9 PWM Case Fan and a Noctua NF-B9 PWM Cooling Fan. The HP xw400 workstation rear chassis fan was making a noise like a jet engine when the case cover was off as for some reason oclvanitygen was using not only 100% of the GPU but 100% of the CPU as well. (Maybe the dual core CPU is easily strained?) The case cover was off because we were using an external power supply during testing. Amazingly the noise problem went away when we eventually put the case cover back on. Perhaps the thick metal that this workstation is made of is especially good at blocking noise? The CPU is still under 100% load. Anyway, the testing is still ongoing at this time so a final determination has not been made.
  • Sep 20, 2013 – $0.00 – We fixed oclvanitygen so it now runs almost four times as fast on our Gigabyte AMD Radeon HD 7950 3GB GDDR. You can download our free fix. Learn how we created the only version of oclvanitygen in the world that runs under Windows and runs high-end AMD cards at full speed! (At the time of this writing we have already generated 3 1Lifeboat addresses on our ancient HP xw400 workstation with its high-end NVIDIA card in a few weeks while generating 0 1Lifeboat addresses on our HP Pavilion Elite HPE-570t which has been using a high-end AMD card for over five months.)
  • Sep 27, 2013 – $97.47 for an IP Power 9258T Network AC Power Controller. Our HP xw400 workstation is crashing about once a day for some reason so our solution is to monitor it with a ping and then to reboot it automatically with the 9258T when it doesn't respond to a ping. Turning off overclocking on the graphics card didn't solve the problem and the machine does pass a thorough memory test.
  • Nov 17, 2014 – The fans on the Sapphire Radeon HD 7950 are failing and it turns out that Sapphire's warranty service is quite poor. (They only handle warranty service via email and we have received no response yet from the email address even though it has been a few days. In addition, the web reports poor service from their warranty service.) We have now ordered a replacement Sapphire Radeon HD 7790 7950 7870 39mm 85mm Video Card Dual-X Fan for $19.77 from eBay.
  • Nov 29, 2014 – We got some response from the Sapphire warranty service so we spent $8.85 at Office Depot to ship the card back. Installing the replacement fans would have voided the warranty so we will save them for further use in case we have later problems with the card fans.