Advisory Board

Marcelo Rinesi

Marcelo Rinesi is the joint Assistant Director of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies (IEET) and the World Transhumanist Association. He is a mathematician, IT consultant and writer based in Buenos Aires, Argentina. He is on the staff of the Future Technologies Advisory Group (FutureTAG) which is a consulting and media group focused on promoting awareness and understanding of radical scientific advances and emerging technologies, as well as evaluating their impact on individuals, businesses and societies.
 
Marcelo was involved in the initial deployment of Open Source solutions in the northeastern region of Argentina, including setting up the first Linux-based email server for the Faculty of Medicine of the Universidad Nacional del Nordeste, and the first intranet application for a law firm in the state. He has also done pro bono work for the Mathematics Department of the Universidad de Buenos Aires, working out alternative possibilities for their website and content management needs.
 
As part of his consulting projects, he has been lead developer in website and intranet developments for companies in Buenos Aires with heavy focus on Open Source technologies like Linux, PHP and Python. He has provided advice in the testing and production deployment of enterprise-grade communication systems for such companies as Citibank and Telefónica de Argentina. He has also developed internal applications for customer relationship management, software license management and software inventory control, as well as coordinating the deployment and administration of the company’s internal data center. He’s also currently lead developer for an Argentine company’s Web Services and Business Process Modeling initiatives.
 
Marcelo has published articles related to technology, business and Argentine life in magazines and online sites including Wired, Computer Bits, The Straits Times, Your Workplace Magazine, Student Traveler, Linux.com, and NewsForge.
 
He teaches mathematics at the Universidad de Buenos Aires. He has participated and written software for numerous expositions and events, made appearances on national TV, ran tutoring groups, and edited the first student-ran, science-oriented online magazine in the Universidad de Buenos Aires’ Facultad de Ciencias Exactas. He is currently a judge for the Argentina’s Olimpíada Nacional de Computación y Matemática, a country-wide yearly competition aiming at encouraging mathematically talented high school programmers, as well as part of a research group at the Universidad de Buenos Aires developing theoretical tools and software to study certain mathematical phenomena related to financial markets.