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Nov 14, 2016

Creating Ultrafast Qubits In Zinc Selenide Crystal

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics

I told folks that we would find that crystalized formations is truly making a difference in the future of QC. There is so much more for us to learn how impactful the formations are in some many areas of communications and technology.

It does make one step back and ponder that perhaps we truly are connected in so many ways as John Wheeler has described many times.


Zinc selenide is a crystal in which atoms are precisely organized, and it is considered a well-known semiconductor material, conducive to introducing tellurium impurities, which can effectively trap positively-charged “holes.” Electron holes are not physical particles like negatively-charged electrons, but can be thought of as the absence of an electron in a particular place in an atom.

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Nov 14, 2016

An Age-Associated Decline in Thymic Output Differs in Dog Breeds According to Their Longevity

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, life extension

Immune system decline one of the hallmarks of aging and something that we should be concerned about addressing.


The age associated decline in immune function is preceded in mammals by a reduction in thymic output. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence of a link between immune competence and lifespan. One approach to determining thymic output is to quantify signal joint T cell receptor excision circles (sj-TRECs), a method which has been developed and used in several mammalian species. Life expectancy and the rate of aging vary in dogs depending upon their breed. In this study, we quantified sj-TRECs in blood samples from dogs of selected breeds to determine whether there was a relationship between longevity and thymic output. In Labrador retrievers, a breed with a median expected lifespan of 11 years, there was an age-associated decline in sj-TREC values, with the greatest decline occurring before 5 years of age, but with sj-TREC still detectable in some geriatric animals, over 13 years of age. In large short-lived breeds (Burnese mountain dogs, Great Danes and Dogue de Bordeaux), the decline in sj-TREC values began earlier in life, compared with small long-lived breeds (Jack Russell terriers and Yorkshire terriers), and the presence of animals with undetectable sj-TRECs occurred at a younger age in the short-lived breeds. The study findings suggest that age-associated changes in canine sj-TRECs are related to breed differences in longevity, and this research highlights the use of dogs as a potential model of immunosenescence.

Citation: Holder A, Mella S, Palmer DB, Aspinall R, Catchpole B (2016) An Age-Associated Decline in Thymic Output Differs in Dog Breeds According to Their Longevity. PLoS ONE 11(11): e0165968. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0165968

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Nov 14, 2016

Scientists develop world’s first light-seeking synthetic nanorobot

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, engineering, nanotechnology, robotics/AI

With bots the size of a single blood cell, this could spur a huge leap in the field of non-invasive surgeries.

Scientists have developed the world’s first light-seeking synthetic nanorobot which may help surgeons remove tumours and enable more precise engineering of targeted medications.

It has been a dream in science fiction for decades that tiny robots can fundamentally change our daily life. The famous science fiction movie “Fantastic Voyage” is a very good example, with a group of scientists driving their miniaturised Nano-submarine inside human body to repair a damaged brain.

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Nov 14, 2016

Physical activity

Posted by in category: life extension

Time to hit the gym as part of your personal longevity plan.


WHO fact sheet on physical activity provides key facts and information on benefits, risks of inactivity, reasons for physical inactivity and how to increase physical activity, WHO response.

Read more

Nov 14, 2016

Russian Researchers Learn How to 3D Print Bullets

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, military

A collaboration between Russia’s Foundation for Advanced Research Projects and the Central Scientific – Research Institute for Precision Machine Engineering known as TSNIITOCHMASH has produced 3D printed bullets.

The Foundation formed in 2012 serves as an advanced research facility for military projects, an equivalent of the American DARPA. The project, conducted by the Foundation’s Laboratory of Additive Technologies and Design materials used selective laser melting technology to create an experimental batch of bullets. This same batch of bullets was then successfully fired.

According to the head of the laboratory, Doctor of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Professor Vladimir Chuvildeeva, the current development team was formed more than ten years ago at the University of Nizhni Novgorod. The team has become specialized in developing laser alloying technology to develop complex physical models. Their end goal is being to develop equipment much more sophisticated for military purposes.

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Nov 14, 2016

Technology that Counters Drone Swarms

Posted by in categories: drones, energy, military

https://youtube.com/watch?v=E18uhfTB9lY

Lockheed Martin engineers are collaborating with customers and academia to research, develop and implement the technology that will detect and defeat swarms.

“We are currently developing a 60-kilowatt system that combines multiple fiber lasers to generate the high power weapon beam,” said Rob Afzal, senior fellow with Lockheed Martin’s Laser and Sensor systems division.

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Nov 14, 2016

We’ve Figured Out How to Program Living Cells

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, evolution, genetics

In Brief:

Researchers at MIT have developed an easy-to-use “biological programming language” that allows genetic engineers (or just about anyone) to design biological circuits and “hack” the genomes of living cells.

The evolution of human technology has proceeded in lockstep with the biological evolution of our species. For millions of years we were content with our primitive Oldowan choppers and Acheulean bifaces; in the Neolithic, we started playing with more sophisticated tools, and the Bronze and Iron ages followed in quick succession.

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Nov 14, 2016

This World-First Brain Implant Is Letting a ‘Locked-In’ Woman Communicate

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, neuroscience

A paralysed woman in the Netherlands is the first to be fitted with a new type of brain implant that allows patients who cannot speak or move to communicate using nothing but their thoughts.

The new implant, which works with a computer interface to help her spell out words and sentences, can be used anywhere, allowing her to communicate with people in the outside world, without medical experts on hand to help.

“This is a world first,” neuroscientist and lead researcher Nick Ramsay, from the University Medical School Utrecht, told CNN. “It’s a fully implantable system that works at home without need for any experts to make it work.”

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Nov 14, 2016

The Future of Deep-Learning—Nvidia Unveils Chip With 15 Billion Transistors

Posted by in categories: futurism, robotics/AI

The Tesla P100 represents a large departure for Nvidia, a company that has focused almost solely on developing chips for workstations and gaming rigs. With the P100, Nvidia is setting their sights on data centers and deep-learning technology.

This is a huge risk as it involves the development of many other things, like a new architecture, new interconnect, and new process, all of which went into the creation of the Tesla P100.

“Our strategy is to accelerate deep learning everywhere,” said Huang.

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Nov 13, 2016

Physicists Just Discovered a Second State of Liquid Water

Posted by in category: physics

It’s one of the most fundamental compounds on Earth, and it makes up roughly 60 percent of the human body, and yet water is turning out to be stranger than we could have ever imagined.

Researchers have been investigating the physical properties of water, and found that when it’s heated to between 40 and 60 degrees Celsius, it hits a ‘crossover temperature’, and appears to start switching between two different states of liquid.

As a chemical compound, water is so vital to life on Earth, we’ve been underestimating how legitimately weird it is.

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