Menu

Blog

Page 9203

Jun 28, 2016

DARPA Moving Fast to Replace US Stealth Fighters with Hypersonic Fighters

Posted by in category: military

In DARPA’s words, “Speed is the new stealth.”

In 2012, DARPA noted the United States is gradually losing the “strategic advantage” that its stealth warplanes have long provided since competitor countries’ stealth and counter-stealth capabilities are improving.

To arrest this decline, DARPA strongly argues the U.S. will need “the new stealth” of hypersonic aircraft.

Continue reading “DARPA Moving Fast to Replace US Stealth Fighters with Hypersonic Fighters” »

Jun 28, 2016

DARPA approaches industry for new battlefield network algorithms and network protocols

Posted by in categories: computing, information science, military, mobile phones

Very nice.


ARLINGTON, Va., 27 June 2016. U.S. military researchers are asking industry for new algorithms and protocols for large, mission-aware, computer, communications, and battlefield network systems that physically are dispersed over large forward-deployed areas.

Officials of the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) in Arlington, Va., issued a broad agency announcement on Friday (DARPA-BAA-16–41) for the Dispersed Computing project, which seeks to boost application and network performance of dispersed computing architectures by orders of magnitude with new algorithms and protocol stacks.

Continue reading “DARPA approaches industry for new battlefield network algorithms and network protocols” »

Jun 28, 2016

Pre and post testing show reversal of memory loss from Alzheimer’s disease in 10 patients

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, chemistry, employment, health, life extension, neuroscience

Results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing show unprecedented improvements in ten patients with early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or its precursors following treatment with a programmatic and personalized therapy. Results from an approach dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration are now available online in the journal Aging.

The study, which comes jointly from the Buck Institute for Research on Aging and the UCLA Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, is the first to objectively show that memory loss in patients can be reversed, and improvement sustained, using a complex, 36-point therapeutic personalized program that involves comprehensive changes in diet, brain stimulation, exercise, optimization of sleep, specific pharmaceuticals and vitamins, and multiple additional steps that affect brain chemistry.

“All of these patients had either well-defined mild cognitive impairment (MCI), subjective cognitive impairment (SCI) or had been diagnosed with AD before beginning the program,” said author Dale Bredesen, MD, a professor at the Buck Institute and professor at the Easton Laboratories for Neurodegenerative Disease Research at UCLA, who noted that patients who had had to discontinue work were able to return to work and those struggling at their jobs were able to improve their performance. “Follow up testing showed some of the patients going from abnormal to normal.”

Continue reading “Pre and post testing show reversal of memory loss from Alzheimer’s disease in 10 patients” »

Jun 28, 2016

The Beginning of the Universe? Quantum Computer Could Simulate Particle Physics

Posted by in categories: computing, particle physics, quantum physics, space

Want to simulate the creation of the Universe — use QC.


Scientists have for the first time simulated the creation of particle and antiparticle pairs in a quantum computer.

(Photo : gr8effect / Pixabay)

Continue reading “The Beginning of the Universe? Quantum Computer Could Simulate Particle Physics” »

Jun 28, 2016

Stephen Hawking warns of ‘AI arms race’ – and reveals what most mystifies him

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, robotics/AI, transportation

Hawking repeats Zoltan Istvan’s worries:

“Governments seem to be engaged in an AI arms race, designing planes and weapons with intelligent technologies,” Hawking told veteran interviewer Larry King. “The funding for projects directly beneficial to the human race, such as improved medical screening, seems a somewhat lower priority.”


British physicist Stephen Hawking sees signs that the applications for artificial intelligence are already going down the wrong track.

Read more

Jun 28, 2016

This is how Google plans to take control of public transit and parking in the U.S

Posted by in category: transportation

Shutterstock.

Alphabet’s “improved city living” company, Sidewalk Labs – the group behind the futuristic digital city story a while back – is already getting its feet wet in real-life situations. The Guardian has obtained documents and emails that detail a proposal made by Sidewalk Labs to the city of Columbus, Ohio. It essentially allows Google to assume control of the city’s public transport and parking system.

The information was obtained through public records laws and details an offer made by Sidewalk Labs to provide the city of Columbus with its cloud-based program called Flow for free. Flow would put the city’s public transit, public parking and transit subsidy program under the control of Google.

Continue reading “This is how Google plans to take control of public transit and parking in the U.S” »

Jun 27, 2016

The future of storage may be in DNA

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, genetics, governance, life extension, neuroscience, security, singularity

Definitely been seeing great research and success in Biocomputing; why I have been looking more and more in this area of the industry. Bio/ medical technology is our ultimate future state for singularity. It is the key that will help improve the enhancements we need to defeat cancer, aging, intelligence enhance, etc. as we have already seen the early hints already of what it can do for people, machines and data, the environment and resources. However, a word of caution, DNA ownership and security. We will need proper governance and oversight in this space.


undefined © iStock/ Getty Images undefined How much storage do you have around the house? A few terabyte hard drives? What about USB sticks and old SATA drives? Humanity uses a staggering amount of storage, and our needs are only expanding as we build data centers, better cameras, and all sorts of other data-heavy gizmos. It’s a problem scientists from companies like IBM, Intel, and Microsoft are trying to solve, and the solution might be in our DNA.

A recent Spectrum article takes a look at the quest to unlock the storage potential of human DNA. DNA molecules are the building blocks of life, piecing our genetic information into living forms. The theory is that we can convert digital files into biological material by translating it from binary code into genetic code. That’s right: the future of storage could be test tubes.

Continue reading “The future of storage may be in DNA” »

Jun 27, 2016

New Paper Claims EM Drive Works, Produces Light As Exhaust

Posted by in categories: physics, space travel

A new paper in AIP Advances argues that the controversial EM Drive doesn’t break physics as we know it, as it emits light (photons) as exhaust. However, other experts assert that it’s likely just an artifact.

Want to get people excited about science? Simple. Just post about EM Drive.

For those of you who may be new to the topic, EM Drive is a method of space travel that, if realized, would utterly transform our way of life. We could get to Mars in just 10 weeks (as opposed to the current 6+ month journey), and we could save a massive amount of money on fuel. We could have a truly viable space industry.

Continue reading “New Paper Claims EM Drive Works, Produces Light As Exhaust” »

Jun 27, 2016

Sun Has Likely Entered New Evolutionary Phase, Say Astronomers

Posted by in categories: evolution, space

The Sun has hit a heretofore unforseen middle-aged evolutionary phase that is characterized by decreasing solar magnetic activity, including starspots and coronal mass ejections, say the authors of a new paper just submitted to APJ Letters. NASA’s Kepler Space Telescope enabled the team to make the determination. The good news is that we have another 5 billion years of relative quiescence before the Sun begins its expansion as a Red Giant.


The Sun has likely already entered into a new unpredicted long-term phase of its evolution as a hydrogen-burning main sequence star — one characterized by magnetic sputtering indicative of a more quiescent middle-age. Or so say the authors of a new paper submitted to The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

Using observations of other sunlike stars made by NASA ’s Kepler Space Telescope, the team found that the Sun is currently in a special phase of its magnetic evolution.

Continue reading “Sun Has Likely Entered New Evolutionary Phase, Say Astronomers” »

Jun 27, 2016

How Ove Arup Brought Engineers Out Of The Shadows — By Meg Miller | Fast Company

Posted by in categories: architecture, engineering

3061191-inline-10-how-ove-arups-total-design-philosophy

“The legendary engineer’s building philosophy has never been more relevant. This summer, he’s getting his first major museum retrospective.”

Read more