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Sep 15, 2017

Why we did not evolve to live forever: Unveiling the mystery of why we age

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, genetics, life extension, neuroscience

Researchers at the Institute of Molecular Biology (IMB) in Mainz, Germany, have made a breakthrough in understanding the origin of the ageing process. They have identified that genes belonging to a process called autophagy — one of the cells most critical survival processes — promote health and fitness in young worms but drive the process of ageing later in life. This research published in the journal Genes & Development gives some of the first clear evidence for how the ageing process arises as a quirk of evolution. These findings may also have broader implications for the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease where autophagy is implicated. The researchers show that by promoting longevity through shutting down autophagy in old worms there is a strong improvement in neuronal and subsequent whole body health.

Getting old, it’s something that happens to everyone and nearly every species on this planet, but the question is, should it? In a recent publication in the journal Genes & Development titled “Neuronal inhibition of the nucleation complex extends lifespan in post-reproductive C. elegans,” the laboratory of Dr Holger Richly at IMB, has found some of the first genetic evidence that may put this question to rest.

As Charles Darwin explained, natural selection results in the fittest individuals for a given environment surviving to breed and pass on their genes to the next generation. The more fruitful a trait is at promoting reproductive success, the stronger the selection for that trait will be. In theory, this should give rise to individuals with traits which prevent ageing as their genes could be passed on nearly continuously. Thus, despite the obvious facts to the contrary, from the point of evolution ageing should never have happened. This evolutionary contradiction has been debated and theorised on since the 1800s. It was only in 1953 with his hypothesis of antagonistic pleiotropy (AP) that George C. Williams gave us a rational explanation for how ageing can arise in a population through evolution. Williams proposed that natural selection enriches genes promoting reproductive success but consequently ignores their negative effects on longevity.

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Sep 15, 2017

5 Things You Should Know About Asteroid Mining

Posted by in category: space

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Sep 15, 2017

Keith Comito on the SCIQ on TYT show talking about why policy needs science to make wise and accurate decisions regarding how society is managed

Posted by in categories: policy, science

It is critical that those responsible for running our nations have scientific knowledge in order to make the right decisions instead of making them based on misunderstandings of what the real science is.

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Sep 15, 2017

The application of nanotechnology to cardiovascular nanomedicine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

Nanostructured systems have the potential to revolutionize both preventive and therapeutic approaches for treating cardiovascular disease. Given the unique physical and chemical properties of nanostructured systems, nanoscience and nanotechnology have recently demonstrated the potential to overcome many of the limitations of cardiovascular medicine through the development of new pharmaceuticals, imaging reagents and modalities, and biomedical devices. A recent review offers an outline of critical issues and emerging developments in cardiac nanotechnology.

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Sep 15, 2017

Study Investigates Vaccine and Oral Medication to Stop Alzheimer’s Years Before it Begins

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

Summary: Researchers are testing a new vaccine and oral medication that could delay or prevent Alzheimer’s disease from developing in those with a genetic predisposition.

Source: Keck Medicine USC.

The Keck School of Medicine of USC launches a study exploring whether two different therapies can prevent a leading cause of death.

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Sep 15, 2017

This man dressed as a car seat in the name of self-driving science

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, science, transportation

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Sep 15, 2017

The futuristic Audi car that should worry Tesla—if it ever gets made

Posted by in categories: sustainability, transportation

It’s called the Aicon, and it’s sure to turn heads.

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Sep 15, 2017

AgeMeter Reaches Initial Fundraising Goal

Posted by in categories: futurism, life extension

We are delighted to announce that the AgeMeter project has reached its initial funding goal and development of the device can now begin thanks to the support of the community. As a result, we will soon have a great aging biomarker system available to the healthcare professional and home enthusiast alike.

We would like to thank Longecity for running a matching fund and for making a big contribution to the project by purchasing an AgeMeter for their affiliate labs program. This means that their affiliated researchers will have access to an AgeMeter for their aging research in the near future and is another great example of how we as a community are helping support scientists working on the front lines.

So far two Longecity affiliates have already expressed an interest in using the AgeMeter:

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Sep 15, 2017

A nuclear fusion reactor has been successfully tested in the UK

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

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Sep 15, 2017

SanDisk Breaks Storage Record With 400GB microSD Card

Posted by in category: futurism

A new microSD card delivers far more storage than previously available, with support for full HD videos and photos.

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