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Nov 22, 2018

These 3D-printed smart devices don’t need batteries or electronics

Posted by in categories: 3D printing, electronics

Researchers at the University of Washington have developed 3D-printed objects that can transmit and store data about their use without the need for batteries or electronics.

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Nov 22, 2018

Massive Triple Star System Creates this Bizarre Swirling Pinwheel of Dust. And it Could be the Site of a Gamma Ray Burst

Posted by in category: cosmology

When stars reach the end of their lifespan, many undergo gravitational collapse and explode into a supernova, In some cases, they collapse to become black holes and release a tremendous amount of energy in a short amount of time. These are what is known as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), and they are one of the most powerful events in the known Universe.

Recently, an international team of astronomers was able to capture an image of a newly-discovered triple star system surrounded by a “pinwheel” of dust. This system, nicknamed “Apep”, is located roughly 8,000 light years from Earth and destined to become a long-duration GRB. In addition, it is the first of its kind to be discovered in our galaxy.

Continue reading “Massive Triple Star System Creates this Bizarre Swirling Pinwheel of Dust. And it Could be the Site of a Gamma Ray Burst” »

Nov 22, 2018

Highly adhesive hydrogel sticks to the task of tissue regeneration

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Researchers from all corners of medical science are hoping to harness advanced hydrogels to help repair damaged hearts, regrow brain tissues, or quickly shut down bleeding wounds, to name just a few examples. Scientists in Switzerland have now developed a new form of the material they say has unparalleled adhesive properties, a characteristic that could prove particularly useful in trying to repair cartilage and meniscus.

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Nov 22, 2018

Bioengineered spinal discs show promise – in goats

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, life extension

As the shock-absorbing cartilage discs between our vertebrae degenerate due to aging, accidents or overuse, severe back pain can result. While some scientists have developed purely synthetic replacement discs, a recent test on goats indicates that bioengineered discs may be a better way to go.

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Nov 22, 2018

It’s #BlackFriday, but we don’t do much shopping in space

Posted by in category: cosmology

It’s #BlackFriday, but we don’t do much shopping in space. Instead, join us for our 6th annual #BlackHoleFriday where we’ll share awesome images and facts about black holes! https://go.nasa.gov/2FB9qQD

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Nov 22, 2018

Non-UP engineers tapped for microsatellite program

Posted by in category: habitats

DOST-Philippines Undersecretary for research and development Rowena Guevara had recognized that to promote wider interest on the study and use of space technologies in the country, they have to get more academe-based engineers into the program.


The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) will get academe-based engineers outside of the University of the Philippine-Diliman to join the country’s microsatellite building program. by Rainier Allan Ronda.

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Nov 22, 2018

It’s time for a 🙌 TOUCHDOWN

Posted by in categories: entertainment, space

No, we’re not talking about the #Thanksgiving day games, but rather our Mars InSight lander mission is on course for a touchdown with a #MarsLanding on Monday, Nov. 26. Learn about how the mission is on track to make this touchdown: https://go.nasa.gov/2qZDdZ2

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Nov 22, 2018

‘Transhumans’ reveal why they want everyone to implant chips under their skin

Posted by in categories: computing, transhumanism

Are the tiny chips a ‘mark of the beast’ which herald the apocalypse or the next revolution in technology?

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Nov 22, 2018

Skeletal imitation reveals how bones grow atom-by-atom

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, materials

Researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have discovered how our bones grow at an atomic level, showing how an unstructured mass orders itself into a perfectly arranged bone structure. The discovery offers new insights, which could yield improved new implants, as well as increasing our knowledge of bone diseases such as osteoporosis.

The bones in our body grow through several stages, with atoms and molecules joining together, and those bigger groupings joining together in turn. One in the growth process is when molecules crystallise, which means that they transform from an amorphous mass into an ordered structure. Many stages of this transformation were previously a mystery, but now, through a project looking at an imitation of how our bones are built, the researchers have been able to follow this crystallisation process at an atomic level. Their are now published in the scientific journal Nature Communications.

“A wonderful thing with this project is that it demonstrates how applied and fundamental research go hand in hand. Our project was originally focused on the creation of an artificial biomaterial, but the material turned out to be a great tool to study bone building processes. We first imitated nature, by creating an artificial copy. Then, we used that copy to go back and study nature,” says Martin Andersson, Professor in Materials Chemistry at Chalmers, and leader of the study.

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Nov 22, 2018

Researchers Have Developed a Potential Blood Test for Autism

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

The tests detect damage to proteins often found in people with autism.

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