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Jul 8, 2019

Girl Paints In Virtual Reality

Posted by in category: virtual reality

Painting 3D art in virtual reality… I could watch for hours 😍.

Jul 7, 2019

The Human Brain Explained | Neuroscience Full Documentary

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, education, neuroscience

The regions and lobes of the brain are identified along with some of the nerves and vessels. The basic functions of the cortex of each lobe are introduced along with principal sulci and gyri. The importance of the left hemisphere for language and the temporal lobe in memory are mentioned along with the concept of cortical localisation. A classical frontal section is used to demonstrate grey and white matter along with the primary internal structures. The brain is one of the largest and most complex organs in the human body. It is made up of more than 100 billion nerves that communicate in trillions of connections called synapses. The brain is made up of many specialised areas that work together: The cortex is the outermost layer of brain cells. the human brain is explained in this video. Full documentary of the human brain.

Jul 7, 2019

Could machines become self-aware?

Posted by in categories: neuroscience, robotics/AI

Analysis: humans make about 35,000 decisions every day so is it possible for AI to deal with a similar volume of high decision uncertainty?

Artificial intelligence (AI) that can think for itself may still seem like something from a science-fiction film. In the recent TV series Westworld, Robert Ford, played by Anthony Hopkins, gave a thought-provoking speech: “we can’t define consciousness because consciousness does not exist. Humans fancy that there’s something special about the way we perceive the world and yet, we live in loops as tight and as closed as the [robots] do, seldom questioning our choices – content, for the most part, to be told what to do next.”

Mimicking realistic human-like cognition in AI has recently become more plausible. This is especially the case in Computational Neuroscience, a rapidly expanding research area that involves the computational modelling of the brain to provide quantitative, computational theories.

Jul 7, 2019

Sleep increases chromosome dynamics to enable reduction of accumulating DNA damage in single neurons

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

Sleep is essential to all animals with a nervous system. Nevertheless, the core cellular function of sleep is unknown, and there is no conserved molecular marker to define sleep across phylogeny. Time-lapse imaging of chromosomal markers in single cells of live zebrafish revealed that sleep increases chromosome dynamics in individual neurons but not in two other cell types. Manipulation of sleep, chromosome dynamics, neuronal activity, and DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) showed that chromosome dynamics are low and the number of DSBs accumulates during wakefulness. In turn, sleep increases chromosome dynamics, which are necessary to reduce the amount of DSBs. These results establish chromosome dynamics as a potential marker to define single sleeping cells, and propose that the restorative function of sleep is nuclear maintenance.

Jul 7, 2019

Deep Aging Clocks: The Emergence of AI-Based Biomarkers of Aging and Longevity

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, economics, life extension, robotics/AI

First published in 2016, predictors of chronological and biological age developed using deep learning (DL) are rapidly gaining popularity in the aging research community.

These deep aging clocks can be used in a broad range of applications in the pharmaceutical industry, spanning target identification, drug discovery, data economics, and synthetic patient data generation. We provide here a brief overview of recent advances in this important subset, or perhaps superset, of aging clocks that have been developed using artificial intelligence (AI).

Jul 7, 2019

A Successful Milestone Test for Our Artemis Program on This Week @NASA

Posted by in category: space travel

This week:

🚀 A milestone for NASA’s Orion Spacecraft 🌑 A commercial lunar payload update 👩🏾‍🏫 More honors for a historic icon.

These are a few of the stories to tell you about on the latest episode of This Week at NASA:

Jul 7, 2019

This Brain Implant Could Change Lives

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, information science, neuroscience

It sounds like science fiction: a device that can reconnect a paralyzed person’s brain to his or her body. But that’s exactly what the experimental NeuroLife system does. Developed by Battelle and Ohio State University, NeuroLife uses a brain implant, an algorithm and an electrode sleeve to give paralysis patients back control of their limbs. For Ian Burkhart, NeuroLife’s first test subject, the implications could be life-changing.

Featured in this episode:

Continue reading “This Brain Implant Could Change Lives” »

Jul 7, 2019

Renewable Energy Is Booming. Here’s How to Keep It Going

Posted by in categories: energy, sustainability

Commentary: Private investors are excited about renewable sources like solar and wind, but they need to focus on energy storage going forward.

Jul 7, 2019

Intelligent Stepping Stones

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, virtual reality

These robotic tiles can track your every step to create an immersive VR experience via 筑波大学|University of Tsukuba.

Jul 7, 2019

An Arctic Fox Has Been Tracked Walking 2,700 Miles From Norway All The Way to Canada

Posted by in category: futurism

At first, the scientists wondered whether it was a mistake.

Just 21 days after leaving the Norwegian island of Spitsbergen, an arctic fox had arrived in Greenland. And in less than three months, it made it to Canada. The fox averaged nearly 30 miles a day (50 kilometers) — some days, though, it walked almost 100 (160 kilometers).

“When it started happening, we thought ‘is this really true?’” said Arnaud Tarroux, one of the researchers who tracked the female fox. Was there “an error in the data?”