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May 17, 2019

New Birth Control Drug Would Work for Men and Women

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

The contraceptive burden has been on women for forever.

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May 17, 2019

Mast cells crucial to causing osteoarthritis

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have definitively linked mast cells, a class of cells belonging to the immune system, to the development of osteoarthritis, one of the world’s most common causes of pain and immobility.

In a study published online May 14 in eLife, the scientists demonstrated for the first time that banishing —or blocking signals from the most common stimulus activating them in real life, or disabling a cartilage-degrading enzyme they release when activated—all protected mice from developing typically induced by a classic experimental procedure. The results were supported by findings in and tissues.

Osteoarthritis, by far the most frequently occurring variety of arthritis, is characterized by cartilage breakdown and inflammation in joints, which can be further aggravated by excess bone growths called osteophytes.

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May 17, 2019

Nobel winner claims lasers can make nuclear waste safe

Posted by in category: nuclear energy

Physicist plans to karate-chop them with super-fast blasts of light.

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May 17, 2019

The volcano that built Bermuda is unlike any other on Earth

Posted by in category: futurism

Rock samples from the island suggest it’s a strange hybrid that represents a whole new way for the planet to make volcanoes.

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May 17, 2019

Electric air taxi startup Lilium completes first test of its new five-seater aircraft

Posted by in category: transportation

Compared to the other preproduction electric aircraft we’ve seen so far, the Lilium Jet certainly stands out: it has an egg-shaped cabin perched on landing gear with a pair of parallel tilt-rotor wings. The wings are fitted with a total of 36 electric jet engines that tilt up for vertical takeoff and then shift forward for horizontal flight. There is no tail, rudder, propellers, or gearbox. When it’s complete, the Lilium Jet will have a range of 300 kilometers (186 miles) and a top speed of 300 km / hour (186 mph), the company says.

That’s much farther than many of its competitors are predicting of their electric aircraft. Remo Gerber, Lilium’s chief commercial officer, said this was due to the Jet’s fixed-wing design, which requires less than 10 percent of its maximum 2,000 horsepower during cruise flight.

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May 17, 2019

Surprising research result: All immature cells can develop into stem cells

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, health

A sensational new study conducted at the University of Copenhagen disproves traditional knowledge of stem cell development. The study reveals that the destiny of intestinal cells is not predetermined, but instead determined by the cells’ surroundings. The new knowledge may make it easier to manipulate stem cells for stem cell therapy. The results have been published in Nature.

All in the foetal gut have the potential to develop into , a new study conducted at the Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences at the University of Copenhagen concludes. The researchers behind the study have discovered that the development of immature intestinal cells—contrary to previous assumptions—is not predetermined, but affected by the cells’ immediate surroundings in the intestines. This discovery may ease the path to effective , says Associate Professor Kim Jensen from the Biotech Research & Innovation Centre (BRIC) and the Novo Nordisk Foundation Center for Stem Cell Biology (DanStem).

“We used to believe that a cell’s potential for becoming a stem cell was predetermined, but our new results show that all immature cells have the same probability for becoming stem cells in the fully developed organ. In principle, it is simply a matter of being in the right place at the right time. Here signals from the cells’ surroundings determine their fate. If we are able to identify the signals that are necessary for the immature cell to develop into a stem cell, it will be easier for us to manipulate cells in the wanted direction.”

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May 17, 2019

The Goliath Birdeater Tarantula Is An Unexpectely Gentle Giant

Posted by in category: futurism

What would do if you ran into the most massive spider in the world?

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May 17, 2019

The Morning After: Sony and Microsoft are teaming up

Posted by in category: futurism

An unholy alliance?

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May 17, 2019

Natural compound found in broccoli reawakens the function of potent tumor suppressor

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, food, genetics

Your mother was right: Broccoli is good for you. Long associated with decreased risk of cancer, broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables—the family of plants that also includes cauliflower, cabbage, collard greens, Brussels sprouts and kale—contain a molecule that inactivates a gene known to play a role in a variety of common human cancers. In a new paper published today in Science, researchers, led by Pier Paolo Pandolfi, MD, Ph.D., Director of the Cancer Center and Cancer Research Institute at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, demonstrate that targeting the gene, known as WWP1, with the ingredient found in broccoli suppressed tumor growth in cancer-prone lab animals.

“We found a new important player that drives a pathway critical to the development of , an enzyme that can be inhibited with a natural compound found in broccoli and other ,” said Pandolfi. “This pathway emerges not only as a regulator for control, but also as an Achilles’ heel we can target with therapeutic options.”

A well-known and potent suppressive gene, PTEN is one of the most frequently mutated, deleted, down-regulated or silenced in human cancers. Certain inherited PTEN mutations can cause syndromes characterized by cancer susceptibility and developmental defects. But because complete loss of the gene triggers an irreversible and potent failsafe mechanism that halts proliferation of cancer cells, both copies of the gene (humans have two copies of each gene; one from each parent) are rarely affected. Instead, exhibit lower levels of PTEN, raising the question whether restoring PTEN activity to normal levels in the cancer setting can unleash the gene’s tumor suppressive activity.

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May 17, 2019

High School Student Uses AI to Detect Gravitational Waves

Posted by in categories: cosmology, education, physics, robotics/AI, supercomputing

Before he could legally drive, high school student Adam Rebei was already submitting jobs on the Blue Waters supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (NCSA) to run complex simulations of black holes.

“My first time using Blue Waters, we did a tour first and got to see the computer, which is a very amazing thing because it’s a very powerful machine,” Rebei told the NCSA, “and I just remember thinking, ‘All of the GPUs!’ It’s an insane amount of GPUs, and I’ve never seen anything like it.”

To get there, Rebei first took an astronomy class that led him to his work with the NCSA. Once there, he teamed up with research scientist Eliu Huerta, who leads the group’s Gravity Group.

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