Menu

Blog

Page 7633

Apr 16, 2019

New discovery makes fast-charging, better performing lithium-ion batteries possible

Posted by in categories: electronics, transportation

Creating a lithium-ion battery that can charge in a matter of minutes but still operate at a high capacity is possible, according to research from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute just published in Nature Communications. This development has the potential to improve battery performance for consumer electronics, solar grid storage, and electric vehicles.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Scanning for cancer treatment

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Chemotherapy helps two out of three patients achieve remission. And recently, drug developers designed a new attack, one intended to target the patient’s malfunctioning genes, reclaim their hijacked cells, and halt growth. But this kind of drug development can result in more errors in trials, and can take years to get from lab to patient.

Now, in a paper published in Nature Chemical Biology, Harvard University Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Chemical Biology Brian Liau reveals why certain AML drugs only work some of the time. With his new technique, Liau and team expose more intimate details about the drug-body relationship and, in the process, disprove previous assumptions about how AML drugs work.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

A doctor raised more than $250 million to create a new kind of clinic that charges a monthly fee, and it could be the future of medicine

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, business, health

  • In the future, going to the doctor’s office might start to feel different, with you or your insurer paying a monthly fee for routine access to your doctor without paying a copay.
  • It’s the model for Iora Health, a startup that works with “sponsors” — mainly employers or private health plans for the elderly (known as Medicare Advantage) — that cover the monthly fee. Iora also built out care teams of nurses and other health professionals that can help the doctors within the practice.
  • We spoke with Iora’s CEO Rushika Fernandopulle about how he built a company that’s raised more than $250 million with plans to grow to 50 practices around the US by the end of 2019.
  • Fernandopulle is one of Business Insider’s 10 people transforming healthcare.
  • Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories.

Fifteen years ago, Rushika Fernandopulle had a radical idea.

A primary care doctor by training, he had been treating patients in the standard, insurance-backed way. But he started to realize that wasn’t working, and insurance wasn’t covering what he wanted to do for patients.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Lighting up DNA-based nanostructures

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nanotechnology

O.o.


Biophysicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have used a new variant of super-resolution microscopy to visualize all the strands of a DNA-based nanostructure for the first time. The method promises to optimize the design of such structures for specific applications.

The term ‘DNA origami’ refers to a method for the design and self-assembly of complex molecular structures with nanometer precision. The technique exploits the base-pairing interactions between single-stranded DNA molecules of known sequence to generate intricate three-dimensional nanostructures with predefined shapes in arbitrarily large numbers. The method has great potential for a wide range of applications in basic biological and biophysical research. Thus researchers are already using DNA origami to develop functional nanomachines. In this context, the ability to characterize the quality of the assembly process is vital. Now a team led by Ralf Jungmann, Professor of Experimental Physics at LMU Munich and Head of the Molecular Imaging and Bionanotechnology lab at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry (Martinsried), reports an important advance in this regard.

Continue reading “Lighting up DNA-based nanostructures” »

Apr 16, 2019

Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall

Posted by in categories: energy, materials

UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow. The first of its kind, this device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

“The can work in remote areas because it provides its own power and does not need batteries,” said senior author Richard Kaner, who holds UCLA’s Dr. Myung Ki Hong Endowed Chair in Materials Innovation. “It’s a very clever device—a that can tell you how much snow is falling, the direction the snow is falling, and the direction and speed of the wind.”

The researchers call it a snow-based triboelectric nanogenerator, or snow TENG. A triboelectric nanogenerator, which generates charge through , produces energy from the exchange of electrons.

Continue reading “Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall” »

Apr 16, 2019

[1810.11490] Could Solar Radiation Pressure Explain ‘Oumuamua’s Peculiar Acceleration?

Posted by in categories: physics, space

The news we had finally found ripples in space-time reverberated around the world in 2015. Now it seems they might have been an illusion.

LIGO’s detectorsEnrico Sacchetti

THERE was never much doubt that we would observe gravitational waves sooner or later. This rhythmic squeezing and stretching of space and time is a natural consequence of one of science’s most well-established theories, Einstein’s general relativity. So when we built a machine capable of observing the waves, it seemed that it would be only a matter of time before a detection.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Optimizing network software to advance scientific discovery

Posted by in categories: mathematics, particle physics, supercomputing

High-performance computing (HPC)—the use of supercomputers and parallel processing techniques to solve large computational problems—is of great use in the scientific community. For example, scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory rely on HPC to analyze the data they collect at the large-scale experimental facilities on site and to model complex processes that would be too expensive or impossible to demonstrate experimentally.

Modern science applications, such as simulating , often require a combination of aggregated computing power, high-speed networks for data transfer, large amounts of memory, and high-capacity storage capabilities. Advances in HPC hardware and software are needed to meet these requirements. Computer and computational scientists and mathematicians in Brookhaven Lab’s Computational Science Initiative (CSI) are collaborating with physicists, biologists, and other domain scientists to understand their data analysis needs and provide solutions to accelerate the scientific discovery process.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Ray Kurzweil Lecture at Newton Free Library

Posted by in categories: futurism, Ray Kurzweil

Click on photo to start video.

Lançamento oficial do livro Danielle World na Newton Free Library.


Palestra Ray Kurzweil sobre o futuro da ciência e Danielle World, bem como uma leitura de livro, entrevista no palco, leitura de passagens do livro, e uma breve introdução da ilustradora, Amy Kurzweil Comix.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Could Alzheimer’s Begin With Bacteria That Cause Gum Disease?

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, neuroscience

If it enters the brain, one species of gum-disease-causing bacteria might trigger chemical changes linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

Read more

Apr 16, 2019

Watch a Pack of Boston Dynamics’ Creepy Robot Dogs Pull a Truck

Posted by in categories: robotics/AI, transportation

Step aside, reindeer — robot dogs are hauling this load.

In an ominous video titled “Mush, Spot Mush!” posted on YouTube Tuesday, robot maker Boston Dynamics showed off the sheer strength of its SpotMini quadripedal robot dog. The clip shows 10 specialized Spotmini derivatives called Spotpower hauling a box truck across a parking lot — and at a one degree incline.

Continue reading “Watch a Pack of Boston Dynamics’ Creepy Robot Dogs Pull a Truck” »