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Apr 24, 2016

How Do We Terraform Jupiter’s Moons?

Posted by in categories: engineering, environmental, space

Jupiter’s four largest moons — the Galileans — have long been considered as possible sites for human habitation, and even terraforming.

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Apr 24, 2016

Elon Musk says Tesla is working on a secret new vehicle that could replace public transport

Posted by in categories: Elon Musk, sustainability, transportation

While speaking at a transport conference in Norway this week, Elon Musk articulated that Tesla’s plan to revolutionize the transportation industry is much broader and more ambitious than initially assumed. In other words, if you thought Tesla’s master plan to usher in an EV revolution was going to end once the Model 3 hit mass production, think again.

DON’T MISS: One video and the story behind it tell you everything you need to know about Prince

Far from it, Tesla is just getting started. Not only have we heard reports that Tesla is eyeing a crossover vehicle based on the Model 3, Musk has also suggested that a Tesla pickup truck might also be a possibility later on down the line.

Continue reading “Elon Musk says Tesla is working on a secret new vehicle that could replace public transport” »

Apr 23, 2016

EGFRvIII-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Migrate to and Kill Tumor Deposits Infiltrating the Brain Parenchyma in an Invasive Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, neuroscience

Sharing for fellow researchers and others who have interest in GBM news.


Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary malignant brain tumor in adults and is uniformly lethal. T-cell-based immunotherapy offers a promising platform for treatment given its potential to specifically target tumor tissue while sparing the normal brain. However, the diffuse and infiltrative nature of these tumors in the brain parenchyma may pose an exceptional hurdle to successful immunotherapy in patients. Areas of invasive tumor are thought to reside behind an intact blood brain barrier, isolating them from effective immunosurveillance and thereby predisposing the development of “immunologically silent” tumor peninsulas. Therefore, it remains unclear if adoptively transferred T cells can migrate to and mediate regression in areas of invasive GBM. One barrier has been the lack of a preclinical mouse model that accurately recapitulates the growth patterns of human GBM in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that D-270 MG xenografts exhibit the classical features of GBM and produce the diffuse and invasive tumors seen in patients. Using this model, we designed experiments to assess whether T cells expressing third-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the tumor-specific mutation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, EGFRvIII, would localize to and treat invasive intracerebral GBM. EGFRvIII-targeted CAR (EGFRvIII+ CAR) T cells demonstrated in vitro EGFRvIII antigen-specific recognition and reactivity to the D-270 MG cell line, which naturally expresses EGFRvIII. Moreover, when administered systemically, EGFRvIII+ CAR T cells localized to areas of invasive tumor, suppressed tumor growth, and enhanced survival of mice with established intracranial D-270 MG tumors. Together, these data demonstrate that systemically administered T cells are capable of migrating to the invasive edges of GBM to mediate antitumor efficacy and tumor regression.

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common form of primary malignant brain tumor in adults and remains one of the most deadly neoplasms. Despite multimodal therapy including maximal surgical resection, radiation, and temozolomide (TMZ), the median overall survival is less than 15 months [1]. Moreover, these therapies are non-specific and are ultimately limited by toxicity to normal tissues [2]. In contrast, immunotherapy promises an exquisitely precise approach, and substantial evidence suggests that T cells can eradicate large, well-established tumors in mice and humans [3] [7].

Continue reading “EGFRvIII-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells Migrate to and Kill Tumor Deposits Infiltrating the Brain Parenchyma in an Invasive Xenograft Model of Glioblastoma” »

Apr 23, 2016

Here’s Why A Universal Basic Income Is The Key To Human Progress

Posted by in categories: economics, innovation

I believe Richard Feynman was one of our greatest scientific minds. He had a very particular way of looking at the world thanks to his father, and it was to look at the world around him as if he were a Martian. Like a fish born into water, it’s hard to actually see water as being water, because it’s all a fish ever knows. And so as humans, it’s a good idea to try and step outside of our usual frame of mind, to see what it is we as humans think and do, from the perspective of a mind totally alien to our everyday environment. With that in mind, here’s what humans are doing right now, from the perspective of someone from far, far away…

What an interesting place and an interesting time it is for a visit. Earth’s most intelligent primates are busy creating technologies that allow them all to do less work, freeing themselves from millennia of senseless toil and drudgery. Strangely, however, they are using such technologies to force each other to work longer and harder. In one area called the United States, responsible for so much of the world’s technological innovation, at a time when productivity has never been higher, the number of hours spent working for others in exchange for the means to live is now just shy of 50 hours per week, where it was once 40 and soon supposed to be 20 on its way to eventually approaching zero.

Humans are even performing work that doesn’t actually need to be done at all, even by a machine. One of the craziest examples of such completely unnecessary work is in Europe where an entire fake economic universe has been created under the label of “Potemkin companies” like Candelia.

Continue reading “Here’s Why A Universal Basic Income Is The Key To Human Progress” »

Apr 23, 2016

“Liquid biopsy” blood test detects genetic mutations

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, genetics, health

A simple blood test can rapidly and accurately detect mutations in two key genes in non-small cell lung tumors, researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and other institutions report in a new study – demonstrating the test’s potential as a clinical tool for identifying patients who can benefit from drugs targeting those mutations.

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Apr 23, 2016

The Army Wants a Star Trek-Like Universal Translator — and Wants IBM to Build It

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

Nice


The army wants a star trek-like universal translator — and wants IBM to build it.

Travel the world. See strange and distant lands. Then invade them.

Continue reading “The Army Wants a Star Trek-Like Universal Translator -- and Wants IBM to Build It” »

Apr 23, 2016

DARPA looking to develop encrypted message app

Posted by in categories: encryption, innovation

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency is looking to take its own swing at an encrypted messaging app.

April 22, 2016.

The Defense Information Systems Agency, like many other federal agencies and the Defense Department as a whole, is bullish on embracing the small, innovative startups popping up in private sector, particularly Silicon Valley. But finding a way to integrate those fast-moving startups into DISA’s rules-encumbered procurement process remains a major hurdle.

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Apr 23, 2016

IARPA Wants a Hand-Held Laser Gun That Can Detect Chemicals 100 Feet Away

Posted by in categories: terrorism, transportation

The creative acronym – SILMARILS – comes from “Lord of the Ring’s” magical lore. IARPA’s goals for the project are anything but fictional.

Current technologies for detecting narcotics, explosives and other dangerous chemicals requires physical contact between humans and X-ray-based machinery like those stationed within major airports that scan suitcases and luggage.

In other cases, a human must swab samples of a substance and run them through a similar machine, which is time and labor consuming and risky.

Continue reading “IARPA Wants a Hand-Held Laser Gun That Can Detect Chemicals 100 Feet Away” »

Apr 23, 2016

Brave New World: Mind-Controlled Drones Revolutionizing Sports And Warfare

Posted by in categories: computing, drones, military, neuroscience

Pretty cool!


As Brain-Computer Interface is rapidly developed worldwide, mind-controlled drones turn into sports and weapons of today.

Continue reading “Brave New World: Mind-Controlled Drones Revolutionizing Sports And Warfare” »

Apr 23, 2016

Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Market — Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 — 2023

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, neuroscience

Nice as long as we get hacking under control.


Brain Computer Interface (BCI) Market — Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast 2015 — 2023.

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