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Dec 12, 2015

Squad X Core Technologies Takes First Steps toward Improving Capabilities for Dismounted Soldiers and Marines

Posted by in category: military

With nine teams selected, the Squad X Core Technologies program will begin taking its first steps toward developing novel technology to deliver dismounted squads better collaboration ability, understanding of surroundings and effectiveness.

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Dec 12, 2015

Samsung just filed a patent for foldable smartphones

Posted by in categories: entertainment, mobile phones

With tech giants around the world dipping their toes in the foldable display game, a flexible, rollable, and foldable smartphone was inevitable. And it looks like Samsung has the upper hand at this point, having recently filed a patent with the US Patent and Trademark Office for a slick new design.

Dubbed Project Valley, the product features a foldable display that could roll and fold in a number of different ways, according to the patent application. But Samsung will likely take advantage of the fact that a foldable screen gives you many different surfaces on which to display things, so we could see screens on the outside, inside, and flanks of the new device.

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Dec 12, 2015

Scientists Create Most Expensive Material on Earth, Costs $4.2 Billion per Ounce

Posted by in categories: materials, mobile phones, particle physics, robotics/AI, transportation

$4.2 billion per ounce. That’s how much the most expensive material on Earth costs. Priced at £100m per gram, the most expensive material on Earth is made up of “endohedral fullerenes,” a cage of carbon atoms containing nitrogen atoms. It could help us make atomic clocks and accurate autonomous cars.


Current atomic clocks are the size of rooms. This material could allow us to make atomic clocks that fit in your smartphone.

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Dec 12, 2015

Researchers Reprogram Genome to Produce More Dopamine

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

This new development could help us in the fight against Parkinson’s.

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Dec 12, 2015

AMD’s mighty Zen CPUs coming to level the playing field with Intel in 2016

Posted by in category: computing

AMD has confirmed we will see high-end desktop FX processors of the Zen variety later on next year.

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Dec 12, 2015

Technology Will Save Our Future, According To Japanese SF Author Taiyo Fujii

Posted by in categories: augmented reality, engineering, genetics, security

I’ve been increasingly interested in translated science fiction novels, and one of the best ones that I picked up this year was Taiyo Fujii’s debut Gene Mapper.

Gene Mapper takes place in a future where augmented reality and genetic engineering is commonplace. When a freelance gene mapper named Hayashida finds that a project that he had worked on is collapsing, he believes that it’s being sabotaged. Determined to fix it, he travels to Vietnam where he finds that there’s more behind the problem than he initially thought.

You can read a tie-in story over on Lightspeed Magazine, ‘Violation of the TrueNet Security Act’.

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Dec 12, 2015

Marvin Minsky Reflects on a Life in AI

Posted by in categories: innovation, robotics/AI

A founding father of artificial intelligence talks about the great breakthroughs of his early years.

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Dec 12, 2015

How virtual reality is going to change our lives

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, military, virtual reality

2016 will be the year of VR. Here’s how it will change everything from medicine to the military.

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Dec 12, 2015

The Biggest Meteor Shower of the Year Is This Weekend and Here’s How to Watch

Posted by in category: space

This weekend’s Geminids are going to be the biggest meteor shower of this year, and you absolutely should not miss it. Here’s when, where, and how to watch the Geminid meteor shower—and what you should be looking for when you do.

The Geminids are a mid-December (this year peaking on Sunday, December 13th) meteor shower formed by the debris of comet 3200 Phaeton burning up in our atmosphere. Phaeton is unusual in that it was only recently recognized as a comet at all. For many years, astronomers believed that Phaethon was really a large asteroid, due to its total lack of ice. Eventually, researchers figured out that Phaethon’s lack of ice was simply due to how close its path was to the sun, and they reclassified it as an extinct comet or a “rock comet.” That extinct comet is responsible for the Geminids you’ll see this weekend.

The Biggest Meteor Shower of the Year Is This Weekend and Here's How to Watch

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Dec 12, 2015

Worm research in life extension leads scientists to discover new metric to track aging

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, evolution, life extension

C. elegans roundworm (credit: The Goldstein Lab)

When researchers at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) in California administered an antidepressant called mianserin to the Caenorhabditis elegans roundworm in 2007, they discovered the drug increased the lifespan of the “young adulthood” of roundworms by 30–40 per cent.

So, does that mean it will work in humans? Not necessarily. “There are millions of years of evolution between worms and humans,” says TSRI researcher Michael Petrascheck. “We may have done this in worms, but we don’t want people to get the impression they can take the drug we used in our study to extend their own teens or early twenties.”

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