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Jan 19, 2016

The US Military Wants a Chip to Translate Your Brain Activity Into Binary Code

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, computing, engineering, military, neuroscience, supercomputing

It’s been a weird day for weird science. Not long after researchers claimed victory in performing a head transplant on a monkey, the US military’s blue-sky R&D agency announced a completely insane plan to build a chip that would enable the human brain to communicate directly with computers. What is this weird, surreal future?

It’s all real, believe it or not. Or at least DARPA desperately wants it to be. The first wireless brain-to-computer interface actually popped up a few years ago, and DARPA’s worked on various brain chip projects over the years. But there are shortcomings to existing technology: According to today’s announcement, current brain-computer interfaces are akin to “two supercomputers trying to talk to each other using an old 300-baud modem.” They just aren’t fast enough for truly transformative neurological applications, like restoring vision to a blind person. This would ostensibly involve connect a camera that can transmit visual information directly to the brain, and the implant would translate the data into neural language.

To accomplish this magnificent feat, DARPA is launching a new program called Neural Engineering System Design (NESD) that stands to squeeze some characteristically bonkers innovation out of the science community. In a press release, the agency describes what’s undoubtedly the closest thing to a Johnny Mneumonic plot-line you’ve ever seen in real life. It reads:

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Jan 19, 2016

Bridging the Bio-Electronic Divide

Posted by in categories: electronics, engineering, neuroscience, supercomputing

A new DARPA program aims to develop an implantable neural interface able to provide unprecedented signal resolution and data-transfer bandwidth between the human brain and the digital world. The interface would serve as a translator, converting between the electrochemical language used by neurons in the brain and the ones and zeros that constitute the language of information technology. The goal is to achieve this communications link in a biocompatible device no larger than one cubic centimeter in size, roughly the volume of two nickels stacked back to back.

The program, Neural Engineering System Design (NESD), stands to dramatically enhance research capabilities in neurotechnology and provide a foundation for new therapies.

“Today’s best brain-computer interface systems are like two supercomputers trying to talk to each other using an old 300-baud modem,” said Phillip Alvelda, the NESD program manager. “Imagine what will become possible when we upgrade our tools to really open the channel between the human brain and modern electronics.”

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Jan 19, 2016

Apple could be testing a technology that is 100 times as fast as Wi-Fi

Posted by in category: internet

Could Apple leveraged Q-Dots for their Li-Fi that produced connection speeds of 224 GBs?


Code that refers to Li-Fi, a technology that uses light to transmit data, has been found in iOS 9.1, hinting at Apple’s interest.

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Jan 19, 2016

How an AI Algorithm Learned to Write Political Speeches

Posted by in categories: information science, robotics/AI

This totally makes sense to me. Whenever, you’re monitoring any type of patterns for collective reasoning or predictive analysis such measuring what voters clap to or respond positively to as well as build out your entire campaign strategy and speeches; AI is your go to solution. So, AI is a must have tool for politicians who strategically plan to win in future elections. No more need for a campaign manager like Karl Rove, etc.


Political speeches are often written for politicians by trusted aides and confidantes. Could an AI algorithm do as well?

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Jan 19, 2016

North Korea invents hangover-free alcohol

Posted by in category: futurism

N. Korea’s latest contribution to humanity.

Non-hangover alcohol


North Korean scientists have invented revolutionary alcohol that won’t give you a hangover — or so they claim.

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Jan 19, 2016

Connecting The Dots to Get the Big Picture with Artificial Intelligence

Posted by in categories: big data, disruptive technology, economics, information science, machine learning

Ask the average passerby on the street to describe artificial intelligence and you’re apt to get answers like C-3PO and Apple’s Siri. But for those who follow AI developments on a regular basis and swim just below the surface of the broad field , the idea that the foreseeable AI future might be driven more by Big Data rather than big discoveries is probably not a huge surprise. In a recent interview with Data Scientist and Entrepreneur Eyal Amir, we discussed how companies are using AI to connect the dots between data and innovation.

Image credit: Startup Leadership Program Chicago

Image credit: Startup Leadership Program Chicago

According to Amir, the ability to make connections between big data together has quietly become a strong force in a number of industries. In advertising for example, companies can now tease apart data to discern the basics of who you are, what you’re doing, and where you’re going, and tailor ads to you based on that information.

“What we need to understand is that, most of the time, the data is not actually available out there in the way we think that it is. So, for example I don’t know if a user is a man or woman. I don’t know what amounts of money she’s making every year. I don’t know where she’s working,” said Eyal. “There are a bunch of pieces of data out there, but they are all suggestive. (But) we can connect the dots and say, ‘she’s likely working in banking based on her contacts and friends.’ It’s big machines that are crunching this.”

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Jan 19, 2016

Russia and China Have Started Enhancing Humans for Battle

Posted by in categories: entertainment, military, robotics/AI, security, singularity

I usually never post articles like this one; however, it does raise a question for me. Could both defense and homeland security needs in addressing risks, and other emergencies really propel us sooner than later into singularity in order to ensure citizens their own protection. As other country militaries race to improve their own military AI & robotic capabilities. https://lnkd.in/ebMQ3Ab


If you thought Enhanced Human Operations (EHO) were an extravagant fantasy of Hollywood films and video games, then think again. Russia and China are involved in EHO, the act of modifying the brain and body in order to create “super soldiers” who will have the upper hand in battles.

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Jan 19, 2016

Quantum Weirdness Now a Matter of Time

Posted by in categories: computing, quantum physics, robotics/AI

Imagine a Quantum computer and/ or device that can perform “all possible operations” with the associated data all at once; and not just performing a series of operations. Meaning, with Quantum Entanglement processing, our AI machines could truly outperform all of us. No longer a fantasy or myth; it will be real.


Bizarre quantum bonds connect distinct moments in time, suggesting that quantum links — not space-time — constitute the fundamental structure of the universe.

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Jan 19, 2016

Objet d’Art: A Space Oddity — By Rachel Small | Interview Magazine

Posted by in categories: media & arts, space, space travel

img-nasa-rake_111059524287

“Though humble in appearance, this object is the product of great ambitions. Dubbed a “Lunar Rake,” it was designed and manufactured in the late 1960s in partnership with NASA. A facsimile of the implement that astronauts would theoretically use to scrape up dust on the moon, this model was used only during training.”

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Jan 19, 2016

A Brief History of Stephen Hawking Being a Bummer

Posted by in categories: engineering, existential risks, genetics, sustainability

Yeah, he’s turned into quite the man-of-panic as of late.


Stephen Hawking is at it again, saying it’s a “near certainty” that a self-inflicted disaster will befall humanity within the next thousand years or so. It’s not the first time the world’s most famous physicist has raised the alarm on the apocalypse, and he’s starting to become a real downer. Here are some of the other times Hawking has said the end is nigh—and why he needs to start changing his message.

Speaking to the Radio Times recently ahead of his BBC Reith Lecture, Hawking said that ongoing developments in science and technology are poised to create “new ways things can go wrong.” The scientist pointed to nuclear war, global warming, and genetically-engineering viruses as some of the most serious culprits.

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