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Aug 24, 2016

New Lidar Chips for Self-Driving Vehicles are Smaller Than a Dime, Cost $10 to Manufacture

Posted by in categories: computing, robotics/AI, transportation

The Lidar (Light detection and ranging) systems on self-driving vehicles are big and generally expensive. MIT has a Lidar-on-a-chip solution that will fit on a dime and cost about $10 to manufacture.

radar system on a chip

Please consider the IEEE Spectrum article MIT and DARPA Pack Lidar Sensor Onto Single Chip.

Continue reading “New Lidar Chips for Self-Driving Vehicles are Smaller Than a Dime, Cost $10 to Manufacture” »

Aug 24, 2016

You Must Define This Term to De-Risk Innovation

Posted by in categories: education, innovation

Very true; even some added the question “is it insane enough?” in the mix. I noticed that Jack Ma seems to like this one.


The Innovation Excellence community is home to innovation articles, webinars, videos, training and education — powering successful growth in the innovation management profession.

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Aug 24, 2016

Algae as vessels for synthetic biology

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biological

Nice.


Algae (a term used to group many photosynthetic organisms into a rather heterologous mash-up) do not have a kind place in the public imagination. Take for example the following passage from Stephen King’s Pet Semetary:

“Dead fields under a November sky, scattered rose petals brown and turning up at the edges, empty pools scummed with algae, rot, decomposition, dust…”

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Aug 24, 2016

Quantum theory is starting to be put into practice

Posted by in categories: quantum physics, transportation

More folks finally seeing the Quantum light.


The story of quantum theory and its applications could be compared to the era of the horse and the arrival of the car.

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Aug 24, 2016

Why quantum satellites will make it harder for states to snoop

Posted by in categories: cybercrime/malcode, quantum physics, satellites

Very true point.


With the launch of the world’s first quantum communication satellite, the era of unhackable communication has begun.

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Aug 24, 2016

Experiment confirms plan for quantum-coded messages

Posted by in category: quantum physics

Really old research breathing new life.


A new way to send secret quantum messages uses shorter keys.

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Aug 24, 2016

The magic of the game changing electric dark matter black holes BH in the crowded centers of galaxies

Posted by in categories: cosmology, quantum physics

New electric dark matter black holes seem to be game changers if concentrated in galaxy centers.

Game changing because BH crowded areas do not form linear Herbig Haro systems with star formation in between.

Result: Red and Dead galaxies as the start of the decline and big crunch.

Continue reading “The magic of the game changing electric dark matter black holes BH in the crowded centers of galaxies” »

Aug 24, 2016

Quantum Entanglement: Slower Than Light

Posted by in categories: particle physics, quantum physics, space

Although this is true (speed of communication via entanglement is not at the speed of light); like other early stage technologies this will also evolve and improve in time.


China recently launched a satellite to test quantum entanglement in space. It’s an interesting experiment that could lead to “hack proof” satellite communication. It’s also led to a flurry of articles claiming that quantum entanglement allows particles to communicate faster than light. Several science bloggers have noted why this is wrong, but it’s worth emphasizing again. Quantum entanglement does not allow faster than light communication.

This particular misconception is grounded in the way quantum theory is typically popularized. Quantum objects can be both particles and waves, They have a wavefunction that describes the probability of certain outcomes, and when you measure the object it “collapses” into a particular particle state. Unfortunately this Copenhagen interpretation of quantum theory glosses over much of the subtlety of quantum behavior, so when it’s applied to entanglement it seems a bit contradictory.

Continue reading “Quantum Entanglement: Slower Than Light” »

Aug 24, 2016

Organic LEDs with low power consumption and long lifetimes

Posted by in categories: energy, mobile phones, quantum physics

A novel device architecture is used to simultaneously achieve extremely high internal quantum efficiencies, low drive voltages, and long lifetimes, at practical luminance levels.

An LED with an emissive organic thin film sandwiched between the anode and cathode is known as an organic-LED (OLED). The emission mechanism of an OLED is superficially similar to that of a standard LED, i.e., holes and electrons are injected from the anode and cathode, respectively, and these carriers recombine to form excited states (excitons) that lead to light emission.1 In recent years, smartphones and TVs with OLED displays have rapidly become widespread because OLEDs provide high contrast, a wide color gamut, light weight, thinness, and flexibility for the displays. OLEDs also have great potential for the creation of new lighting applications.2 The high power consumption and short lifetime of OLEDs, however, remain key issues.

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Aug 24, 2016

Will superfast ‘quantum’ computers mean the end of unbreakable encryption?

Posted by in categories: computing, encryption, quantum physics

Not worried today; but would worry in the next 5 yrs for sure.


A new type of computer means we’ll need a new way to make our data secure.

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