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Jun 2, 2018

This Smartphone Pioneer Is Fighting to Create a Transhumanist Superdemocracy

Posted by in categories: mobile phones, robotics/AI, sustainability, transhumanism

It’s a philosophy best exemplified by Wood’s book released last month, Transcending Politics: A Technoprogressive Roadmap to a Comprehensively Better Future, which starts by declaring politics “broken,” technology as something that “risks making matters worse,” and deems transhumanism the force that can fix it all “comprehensively”:


David Wood, a transhumanist who co-founded Symbian in 1998, is working to develop a transhumanist superdemocracy that uses the best parts of artificial intelligence and communication to draw on the likes of Zoltan Istvan and Peter Thiel in a new movement to create longevity and sustainable abundance for all.

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Jun 2, 2018

8 Amazing CRISPR projects that could change life as we know it

Posted by in categories: bioengineering, biotech/medical, genetics

8 Amazing CRISPR gene editing projects that could change life as we know it.


Since it burst onto the scene a decade ago, CRISPR-Cas9 has shaken the field of genetics to its core. Offering a new genomic editing tool that’s faster, cheaper and more accurate than previous approaches, it opens up an astonishing breadth of possible applications.

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Jun 1, 2018

News: SMAP, the spacecraft I once worked on, is providing relative moisture data from the Earth’s surface

Posted by in categories: food, health, space travel

It’s interesting to note that eastern Texas, Louisiana and Arkansas are experiencing much less soil moisture during the middle of May…


Data from the first NASA satellite mission dedicated to measuring the water content of soils is now being used operationally by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to monitor global croplands and make commodity forecasts.

The Soil Moisture Active Passive mission, or SMAP, launched in 2015 and has helped map the amount of water in soils worldwide. Now, with tools developed by a team at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, SMAP soil moisture data are being incorporated into the Crop Explorer website of the USDA’s Foreign Agricultural Service, which reports on regional droughts, floods and crop forecasts. Crop Explorer is a clearinghouse for global agricultural growing conditions, such as soil moisture, temperature, precipitation, vegetation health and more.

Continue reading “News: SMAP, the spacecraft I once worked on, is providing relative moisture data from the Earth’s surface” »

Jun 1, 2018

Evidence Found for a New Fundamental Particle

Posted by in category: particle physics

An experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago has detected far more electron neutrinos than predicted — a possible harbinger of a revolutionary new elementary particle called the sterile neutrino, though many physicists remain skeptical.

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Jun 1, 2018

This Filter Makes Your Photos Indecipherable to Facial Recognition Software

Posted by in category: robotics/AI

By selectively altering specific pixels, and AI system can block facial-recognition software without making visible changes to a photo.

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Jun 1, 2018

Engineered antibody summons immune system to kill cancer cells

Posted by in category: biotech/medical

Researchers have engineered an anti-cancer antibody that attaches specifically to cancer cells and summons immune killer cells to destroy the target.

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Jun 1, 2018

Quantum Computing Key Could Protect Blockchain Security

Posted by in categories: bitcoin, computing, quantum physics, security

Although blockchain is traditionally seen as secure, it is vulnerable to attack from quantum computers. Now, a team of Russian researchers say they have developed a solution to the quantum-era blockchain challenge, using quantum key distribution (QKD).

Quantum computers are different from binary digital electronic computers based on transistors. Whereas common digital computing requires that the data be encoded into binary digits (bits), each of which is always in one of two definite states (0 or 1), quantum computation uses quantum bits, which can have more by being in superpositions of states.

Writing in the journal Quantum Science and Technology, the researchers set out a quantum-safe blockchain platform that uses QKD to achieve secure authentication.

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Jun 1, 2018

Wi-Fi in the road? Kansas City tech start-up is wiring pavement for safety — and fun

Posted by in categories: futurism, internet

Integrated Roadways of Kansas City is developing “smart pavement” technology that would make roads more than just something you drive on. Roads would become a platform for future mobility and safety applications.

Neil Nakahodo

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Jun 1, 2018

Prototype nuclear battery packs 10 times more power

Posted by in categories: biotech/medical, nuclear energy, robotics/AI, space travel

Russian researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (MIPT), the Technological Institute for Superhard and Novel Carbon Materials (TISNCM), and the National University of Science and Technology MISIS have optimized the design of a nuclear battery generating power from the beta decay of nickel-63, a radioactive isotope. Their new battery prototype packs about 3,300 milliwatt-hours of energy per gram, which is more than in any other nuclear battery based on nickel-63, and 10 times more than the specific energy of commercial chemical cells. The paperwas published in the journal Diamond and Related Materials.

Conventional batteries

Ordinary batteries powering clocks, flashlights, toys, and other compact autonomous electrical devices use the energy of so-called redox chemical reactions. In them, electrons are transferred from one electrode to another via an electrolyte. This gives rise to a potential difference between the electrodes. If the two battery terminals are then connected by a conductor, electrons start flowing to remove the potential difference, generating an electric current. Chemical batteries, also known as galvanic cells, are characterized by a high power density — that is, the ratio between the power of the generated current and the volume of the battery. However, chemical cells discharge in a relatively short time, limiting their applications in autonomous devices. Some of these batteries, called accumulators, are rechargeable, but even they need to be replaced for charging. This may be dangerous, as in the case of a cardiac pacemaker, or even impossible, if the battery is powering a spacecraft.

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Jun 1, 2018

What If Our Sun Were to Die?

Posted by in category: futurism

At least it wouldn’t be so hot outside, right?

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